Emerging nonprofit leaders earn national recognition


April 27, 2009

Thirteen ASU American Humanics (AH) students have been awarded Next Generation Nonprofit Leaders Program (NextGen) scholarships and one student has been selected as a recipient of the 2009-10 American Humanics Academic Award. This all-time high number of ASU AH NextGen students will each receive $4,500 from NextGen as part of a multi-year Kellogg Foundation Grant to American Humanics, Inc. to support students across the American Humanics campus affiliate network. The NextGen scholarships support costs associated with the students’ senior internships in nonprofits. The Academic Award is a $1,000 scholarship; one of only 20 awarded out of over 90 applications. 

ASU American Humanics NextGen scholarship recipients:
• Frank Carbone, Jr. of Cleveland
• Emily Curry of Chandler, Ariz.
• Candida Henriquez of  Mesa, Ariz.
• Chris Maddox of Phoenix
• Rachael Mangum of Mesa, Ariz.
• Julianne Mate of Phoenix
• Erika Moore of Los Angeles
• Kristina Oniszko of Tucson, Ariz.
• Andrea Payne of Tempe, Ariz.
• Jenna Schaefer of St. Paul, Minn.
• Jennifer Speer of San Antonio
• Megan Trombetta of Phoenix
• Laura Zilverberg of Minneapolis Download Full Image

American Humanics Acadamic Award:
• Alexandra Paul of Phoenix

“Receiving 14 scholarships in one year is quite an accomplishment for the American Humanics program at ASU,” said Stacey Freeman, Program Coordinator, Sr. for the ASU AH program. “We are so proud of our students’ hard-work and dedication to both academics and the nonprofit sector.”

This group of scholarship recipients was awarded a total of $59,500. Since the establishment of the NextGen program, ASU AH students have received $103,500 in NextGen scholarships. In the past, nonprofits at which NextGen awardees have interned contributed $24,600 in match monies. That means, to date, ASU AH students have received a total of $128,100 in support of the costs associated with their senior internships. Alexandra Paul joins a long list of past ASU AH students to receive the American Humanics Academic Award, including Jenna Schaefer, a current recipient of the NextGen scholarship.

“ASU is a national leader in preparing next generation leaders for the nonprofit sector,” said Dr. Robert F. Ashcraft, director of the Lodestar Center for Philanthropy and Nonprofit Innovation and professor of nonprofit studies at ASU. “We have several programs and strategies in place to assure we are helping solve this human resource pipeline issue and our American Humanics program leads the way. Garnering this number of student awards is a testimony to the caliber of our AH students and their yearning to apply passion and competence to their nonprofit careers.”

Founded in 1980, ASU American Humanics is a program of the School of Community Resources and Development, in association with the ASU Lodestar Center for Philanthropy and Nonprofit Innovation (formerly the Center for Nonprofit Leadership and Management). ASU is one of the leading programs in the nation, preparing future nonprofit professionals. Students pursuing American Humanics certification complete various experiential requirements including active participation in the student association, 18 credit hours of in-class coursework, and a 12 credit hour internship. For more information, visit: http://www.asu.edu/copp/nonprofit/edu/ah.htm">http://www.asu.edu/copp/nonprofit/edu/ah.htm">http://www.asu.edu/copp/no....

The ASU Lodestar Center for Philanthropy and Nonprofit Innovation (formerly the ASU Center for Nonprofit Leadership and Management), is recognized as a national leader in undergraduate and graduate nonprofit education, research and technical assistance. The ASU Lodestar Center exists to enhance the quality of life in communities through the advancement of nonprofit leadership practices and provides knowledge and tools to build the capacity of nonprofit organizations, professionals, board members, donors and volunteers by offering a selection of capacity building workshops, conferences, classes, and programs. For more information, visit: http://nonprofit.asu.edu/" title="http://nonprofit.asu.edu.">http://nonprofit.asu.edu/">http://nonprofit.asu.edu.

ASU In the News

ASU policy analyst discusses Arizona teen survey


<p>Senior Policy Analyst Bill Hart spoke about a recent survey of Arizona teens by the ASU Morrison Institute for Public Policy during an April 9 segment of &quot;Arizona Illustrated,&quot; a program on Arizona Public Television.</p>The results of the survey were published in a report, &quot;Great Expectations: Arizona Teens Speak Up,&quot; the fourth issue of the Morrison Institute's Forum 411 briefing series. The report offers insights into the state's 600,000-plus adolescents from professionals who work with them every day and from teens themselves. <p>Key findings from the survey include: <b><br /></b></p><p> • Asked about the essential elements of a “good life,” most teens chose “doing work that you enjoy” and “having a happy family.”</p><p>• Asked whether a college degree is key to a good future, 88% agreed.</p><p>• Two-thirds (67%) of teens said they do volunteer work.</p><p>• Most teens say they have lots of friends (84%), enjoy diversity (93%), and look forward to the future (78%).</p><p>• Only 26% of teens agreed that “adults will leave the world in good shape for people my age”.</p> <p>To view the interview, visit: <a href="http://tinyurl.com/dda89w">http://tinyurl.com/dda89w</a>. To read the report, visit: <a href="http://www.asu.edu/copp/morrison/411_azteens.htm">http://www.asu.edu/cop.... </p>

Article Source: Arizona Public Media

Nominees sought for Arizona Behavioral Health Awards


March 25, 2009

Meeting the behavioral health needs of our fellow citizens can be challenging. Whether it takes the form of counseling a recovering methamphetamine user, providing housing to domestic violence victims, or launching a new outreach program for homeless individuals suffering from serious mental illness, working in the behavioral health field demands passion, compassion, perseverance, and dedication from those who serve.

In recognition of these efforts, Arizona State University's Center for Applied Behavioral Health Policy seeks nominations for the 2009 Arizona Behavioral Health Awards. All award recipients will be recognized at the Fifth Annual Arizona Behavioral Health Awards Gala on July 23, at the Hilton Sedona Resort and Conference Center. Download Full Image

Award categories

LEGACY AWARD
Recognizes an individual in the field of behavioral health services with a distinguished career of leadership and contribution to the behavioral health community of Arizona.

CULTURAL HERITAGE AWARD
Recognizes an individual or agency that has demonstrated a commitment to promoting understanding and celebration of the rich cultural heritage of the State of Arizona and those individuals and families impacted by issues of behavioral health.

LEADERSHIP IN ADVOCACY AWARD
In recognition of an individual, advocates, or persons in recovery or their family members, who has demonstrated leadership in the promotion of enhanced behavioral health for the citizens of Arizona.

LEADERSHIP IN SERVICES AWARD
In recognition of an individual employed within the behavioral health system who has shown leadership in his/her agency's provision of evidence-based services, and who exemplifies the core values of developing community, promoting communication and learning, demonstrating a compassion for individuals who have been disenfranchised or marginalized, and helping people, particularly those with behavioral health disabilities.

LEGISLATIVE LEADERSHIP AWARD
In recognition of an elected official, holding office at the local, state, or Federal level who has demonstrated sustained leadership in advocating for behavioral health services.

NOMINATION GUIDELINES

1. You may submit nominations in more than one category.

2. You may submit more than one nomination in each category.

3. Nominations must be postmarked NO LATER THAN April 30, 2009.

4. Nominations may be e-mailed to: linda.williamson@asu.edu or faxed to: (602) 942-0779.

Return completed form(s) to:
Arizona Behavioral Health Awards
c/o The Center for Applied Behavioral Health Policy
College of Public Programs
Arizona State University
P.O. Box 37100, MC 3252
Phoenix, AZ 85069-7100

To download the registration form, visit http://www.cabhp.asu.edu/pro-development/ldrform.pdf.">http://www.cabhp.asu.edu/pro-development/ldrform.pdf">http://www.cabhp.a...

Prisoner reentry is focus of April 3 conference at ASU


March 5, 2009

Arizona State University’s School of Criminology and Criminal Justice will host a daylong conference, “Prisoner Reentry: A Twenty-First Century Imperative,” on April 3 at the Mercado on ASU’s Downtown Phoenix campus, Building C, 502 E. Monroe St.

The three-session discussion is designed for researchers interested in criminal justice; policymakers responsible for shaping public safety or social services; practitioners in criminal justice interested in criminal justice policy, public safety, prisons and prisoner reentry; and students interested in the criminal justice system. Download Full Image

The conference takes on additional significance in light of a recently released report by the Pew Center on the States’ Public Safety Performance Project, which showed that for the first time in history more than one in every 100 adults in America are in jail or prison.  According to the report released Feb. 28, costs to states rise as prison populations increase, and last year, states spent more than $49 billion on corrections, up from $11 billion 20 years before.  With about half of released inmates returning to jail or prison within three years, the national recidivism rate remains virtually unchanged.

“The Pew Report notes that the state of Arizona is spending more than 45 other states on corrections as a percentage of the total state budget,” says Scott Decker, director of the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice, which is part of ASU’s College of Public Programs. “This conference is particularly important in these times, and the recommendations for policy change and practice change that will come from such a gathering will be received with a great deal of interest and attention.”

The conference will bring three criminal justice experts to the Valley.  In the opening session, Todd Clear, a Distinguished Professor in the Department of Law, Police Science and Criminal Justice Administration at the City University of New York’s (CUNY) John Jay College of Criminal Justice, will discuss community-level collateral consequences of mass incarceration.  The second session will be led by Beth Huebner, director of the graduate program at the University of Missouri – St. Louis Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice.  Huebner, whose expertise is in the areas of prisoner reentry and criminal justice decision-making, will explore long-term recidivism patterns of different types of offenders.  The day’s final session will consider family connections and prisoner reentry, and will be led by Damian Martinez.  Martinez is presently an assistant professor in Rutgers University’s School of Criminal Justice who will be joining ASU’s faculty in the fall.  His research expertise focuses on prisoner reentry and reintegration.

The three discussion leaders will be joined at the end of the day by Kathy Waters, the division director for Adult Probation Services for the Arizona Supreme Court, in a panel discussion that will review the conference’s three sessions.

The School of Criminology and Criminal Justice is committed to linking policy, research and practice by regularly sponsoring public events.  This is the second event in a series that examines issues such as violence, crime prevention, gangs, and strategic problem solving in criminal justice.

For information, call the school at 602-543-6607, or e-mail Betty.Sedillo">mailto:Betty.Sedillo@asu.edu">Betty.Sedillo@asu.edu.

Steve Des Georges

Master of Nonprofit Studies Student Poster Display


February 12, 2009

Master of Nonprofits Studies (MNpS) students enrolled in the NLM 620 Capstone Class, Critical Issues in Nonprofit Management, are required to complete a final capstone report synthesizing their knowledge of a critical issue facing the nonprofit sector.

Capstone reports provide an overview of the issue, how it impacts nonprofit organizations and recommendations to nonprofit executives for managing the issue in their organizations.  MNpS students in the Fall 2008 Capstone Class created poster representations of their capstone reports for display at the ASU Lodestar Center’s 16th Annual Nonprofit Conference on Sustainability Strategies in December. Download Full Image

The posters will now be on display for a limited showing, Monday, February 23 through Wednesday, March 4, at the University Center at Downtown Phoenix Campus on the Second Floor Mezzanine.

For more information on the MNpS program go to http://nonprofit.asu.edu">http://nonprofit.asu.edu">http://nonprofit.asu.edu.

ASU, Arizona-Mexico Commission launch online funding database


January 22, 2009

The ASU Lodestar Center for Philanthropy and Nonprofit Innovation has added a new resource to its portfolio of programs to help nonprofit organizations. The Arizona Grants Access Tool and Experts Source (AzGATES) is an online database connecting those in need of funding with local, national and international sponsors who can help serve that need. AzGATES was created by Arizona State University and the Arizona-Mexico Commission to serve as Arizona’s premier resource for obtaining funding for priority projects throughout the state. In becoming a program of the Lodestar Center, the Center will continue to develop the database and increase its awareness among nonprofits that could benefit from its resources.

Governor Napolitano recognized that a deficiency of funding throughout the state, specifically near the border region, was a continuing issue hindering economic development in Arizona. Many people know that funding is available, but identifying it can be a daunting task. AzGATES can be utilized by individuals, organizations and communities for almost any type of project in Arizona, thereby increasing access to funding resources for anyone who seeks it. Download Full Image

“A knowledge and tools resource like AzGATES is valuable at any time to help build the capacity of the nonprofit sector,” said Dr. Robert F. Ashcraft, director of the Lodestar Center and professor of nonprofit studies at ASU. “But it is even more important now during this time of fiscal stress. Connecting those who provide essential services with those funders who grant in areas of interest is a promise of AzGATES by extending the capacity building mission of our center into an important arena for our community.”

AzGATES">http://azgates.asu.edu">AzGATES, includes:

• Advanced search options: Search by area of interest, type of sponsor, deadlines or type of support.

• List of top sponsors: Allows user quick access to those who give the most funding in Arizona.

• Collaboration Suite: Helps user identify potential partners for projects.

• Personalized funding alerts: Alerts sent directly to the user’s e-mail address, providing access to the latest grant information.

• AzGATES caters specifically Arizona residents, communities, and organizations by providing the most relevant funding opportunities possible.

Access is free and includes a member profile.

The ASU Lodestar Center for Philanthropy and Nonprofit Innovation (formerly the ASU Center for Nonprofit Leadership and Management), is recognized as a national leader in undergraduate and graduate nonprofit education, research and technical assistance. The ASU Lodestar Center exists to enhance the quality of life in communities through the advancement of nonprofit leadership practices and provides knowledge and tools to build the capacity of nonprofit organizations, professionals, board members, donors and volunteers by offering a selection of capacity building workshops, conferences, classes, and programs. For more information, visit: http://nonprofit.asu.edu/" title="http://nonprofit.asu.edu.">http://nonprofit.asu.edu/">http://nonprofit.asu.edu.

ASU American Humanics earns fundraising award


January 22, 2009

Arizona State University American Humanics (AH) received the Hartsook Companies’ American Humanics Excellence in Fundraising Award at the American Humanics Management/ Leadership Institute (AHMI), held Jan. 4-7 in Indianapolis. Eugene R. Temple, President of the Indiana University Foundation, presented the award on behalf of Dr. Robert Hartsook, Chairman and CEO of Hartsook Companies, Inc., a national fundraising consulting firm based in Wichita, Kansas.

AH and Hartsook Companies recognized ASU for their outstanding ability to connect to community resources in support of their program. Not only did ASU secure a total of $38,175 in contributions, which is an average of $459.94 per student, but they also placed emphasis on involving AH students in the fundraising process. Students participated in their AHMI 2008 Campaign course (learning fundraising strategy and etiquette as they manage an “ask” campaign) and surpassed their goal of $32,000, raising $35,175.  ASU students led the “environmental team” for the Iron Man competition, earning $1,500.  Students also earned money by seeking out student government funding, partnering with local restaurants, and working concession stands.  Accepting the award on behalf of ASU were AH Campus/Executive Director Dr. Robert F. Ashcraft, Program Coordinator Stacey Freeman, and the ASU AH students in attendance. Download Full Image

More than 1,000 students, faculty, nonprofit and corporate leaders took part in AHMI 2009, a capstone educational experience for college students earning AH Certification in Nonprofit Leadership and Management.

Founded in 1980, ASU American Humanics is a program of the School of Community Resources and Development, in association with the ASU Lodestar Center for Philanthropy and Nonprofit Innovation (formerly the Center for Nonprofit Leadership and Management). ASU is one of the leading programs in the nation, preparing future nonprofit professionals. Students pursuing American Humanics certification complete various experiential requirements including active participation in the student association, 18 credit hours of in-class coursework, and a 12 credit hour internship. For more information, visit: http://www.asu.edu/copp/nonprofit/edu/ah.htm">http://www.asu.edu/copp/nonprofit/edu/ah.htm">http://www.asu.edu/copp/no....

Professor's book receives 'outstanding academic title' award


December 30, 2008

"Drug Smugglers on Drug Smuggling: Lessons From the Inside," a book co-written by Scott Decker, professor and director of ASU's School of Criminology and Criminal Justice, was chosen by the American Library Association as an "Outstanding Academic Title" of 2008 in the category of sociology.

The book was selected by editors of the American Library Association's "Choice" magazine as one of the most significant print and electronic works reviewed last year. Appearing annually in the January issue, this prestigious list of publications attracts attention from the academic library community. Download Full Image

Decker's book examines the underworld of international drug smuggling and is based on interviews he and Margaret Townsend Chapman conducted with 34 drug smugglers serving long sentences in federal prison. Chapman is an associate at Abt Associates Inc.

Their research was funded by the Office of National Drug Control Policy, U.S. Coast Guard, and U.S. Customs Service.

In addition, Scott's solo-authored 2008 book, "A Guidebook for Local Law Enforcement Strategies to Address Gang Crime," has been nominated for the National Association of Government Communicators  Blue Pencil/Gold Screen Awards. The book was published by the U.S. Department of Justice.

Program marks ‘graduation’ of 5,000th parent


December 23, 2008

Arizona State University celebrated the “graduation” of the 5,000th parent from the American Dream Academy during a ceremony Dec. 16 in Phoenix.

The academy works with schools in low-income, disadvantaged residential areas to provide a transformative experience for parents by teaching them how to navigate the school system and take an active role in their children’s education. It is the signature program of the Center for Community Development and Civil Rights at ASU’s College of Public Programs on the Downtown Phoenix campus. Download Full Image

Parents of K-12 students receive free training through the nine-week program that aims to create a community where parents and teachers collaborate to transform each child's educational environment, both at home and at school, so that all children can achieve their greatest academic potential.

“The heart of the program is education because we believe that is the key to the American dream,” says Alejandro Perilla, director of the Center for Community Development and Civil Rights. “In order to really transform education, we have to give families the skills and tools that help to support and further develop what their children are learning in school.”

Now more than 5,055 parents have graduated from 58 program offerings in school districts across the Valley. The program has impacted more than 15,000 low-income, minority youth throughout the Phoenix metropolitan area since it began in 2006.

For many parents, the ceremonies mark the first time they’ve graduated from any program, and they often beam with pride while walking across the stage with their children. Several parents work two full-time jobs, but still make time to complete the program to ensure their children get the most from their education.

“I feel very confident that the information learned through these classes will help me advocate for my children’s social, emotional, academic and physical well-being, while building a mutually beneficial relationship with school and community,” says parent graduate Elijah Washington.

More than 75 volunteers use a curriculum that explains how to navigate the school system, use effective communication/collaboration with teachers and administrators, create a positive home learning environment, and support a child’s emotional and social development.

The ASU Center for Community Development and Civil Rights works to build bridges between ASU and the community to address problems, share knowledge and act as a catalyst for transformation. Its programs are designed to strengthen low-income, marginalized populations and help them become knowledgeable in education, finance, health care, and the basics of housing, transportation and local ordinances. For information about the Center, visit http://cdcr.asu.edu">http://cdcr.asu.edu/">http://cdcr.asu.edu.

Light rail adds new dimension to Downtown Phoenix campus


December 12, 2008

When the Metro Light Rail makes its Dec. 27 debut, it will end shuttle service between the Tempe and Downtown Phoenix campuses, but usher in new era of public transportation.

Arizona State University plans to discontinue the shuttle service on Dec. 22 and is counting on light rail to improve upon the model they created in 2006. Download Full Image

“It really is a better service because students will be able to catch a train every 10 minutes as opposed to waiting a half-hour for the bus,” said Patrice Bettison-Clark, public relations specialist for ASU’s Parking and Transit Services. “It’s going to be different and it’s going to be a change, but it’s a positive change.” She added that it will take about 25 minutes to go from Tempe to the Downtown Phoenix campus.

Metro representatives say light rail trains will run their first full trip at 4:40 a.m. on weekdays and 5 a.m. on weekends. Trains will arrive at each stop every 10 minutes from 6 a.m. to 7 p.m. weekdays and every 15 to 20 minutes on weekends and off-peak hours. The last full trip begins at 11 p.m. and ends at midnight.

Stations located at the Downtown Phoenix campus include stops at Central Avenue and Van Buren Street, First Avenue and Van Buren Street,Third Street and Washington and Third Street and Jefferson. Tempe stations are located at Veteran’s Way and College Ave., University Drive and Rural Road and Mill Avenue and Third Street.

ASU Parking and Transit Director Theresa Fletcher said the 20-mile light rail system is environmentally friendly, will allow riders access to civic places of interest, alleviate the need for additional parking in downtown Phoenix and provide users with a reliable mode of transportation. She added that light rail will also save the school approximately half a million dollars a year in costs.

“That cost savings is important during these hard economic times,” Fletcher said. “Students who use the service will also help in the future development of light rail.” Metro representatives say that an additional 37 miles of high capacity transit will be built by 2025.

Nicole Ethier, a 20-year-old journalism student who divides her time between Tempe and downtown Phoenix, said light rail’s debut sends a message that Phoenix has emerged as a metropolitan city.

“I feel as if Phoenix is finally becoming a big city by providing alternative transportation rather than just driving your car everywhere,” Ethier said. “I never thought of the downtown area as a city before. It’s now an urban downtown.”

Rabia Abdul-Majeed, a nursing student who lives in Tempe, said she’ll be taking light rail to get to the Downtown Phoenix campus.

“Light rail has a lot of buzz and there’s an excitement about it,” Abdul-Majeed said. “I’m looking forward to utilizing it and cutting down on my wait time.”

Despite the advantages and buzz surrounding light rail, Metro spokeswoman Hillary Foose said safety is the message her organization wants to convey to students.

“We look forward to having ASU students on board, but it’s critical to remember how to be safe around light rail,” Foose said. She recommended riders brush up on their safety skills and conduct at www.metrolightrail.org/safety.

Metro Light Rail will start service on Saturday, Dec. 27 and will offer free rides starting on Dec. 27 until Wednesday, Dec. 31. Regular service will start Thursday, Jan. 1, 2009.

For more information on Metro Light Rail, call (602) 254-RAIL or visit www.MetroLightRail.org.">http://www.MetroLightRail.org">www.MetroLightRail.org.

Metro Light Rail Safety Tips:

-           Light rail is quiet; look and listen for the train

-           Obey the traffic signals; stop on red

-           Use the crosswalks and obey all signals

-           Stay off the track; never drive, bike, walk or skateboard on the tracks

-           Stay clear of the overhead wires; they are energized

">mailto:Marshall.Terrill@asu.edu">

Reporter , ASU Now

480-727-5176

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