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ASU photographs inspire poems by Arizona Poet Laureate Alberto Ríos.
February 16, 2017

Project to celebrate National Poetry Month combines the words of Arizona Poet Laureate Alberto Ríos and images by ASU Now

In anticipation of National Poetry Month in April, Arizona Poet Laureate and Regents' Professor Alberto Ríos and ASU Now photographers Charlie Leight and Deanna Dent are collaborating to create a "visual sonnet." Each week we share a new image and poem on our @asunow Instagram account. When completed, the entire project will be found on this page, culminating on April 27.

All images were captured not for "work," but as images that stood out to each photographer. Ríos then wrote short poems adapted to the images without knowing their initial context.

"The best of collaboration suggests two or more people working not in service to each other, but to the idea they envision, differently," said Ríos. 

Ríos, who often collaborates with community members and artists from different parts of Arizona, has seen the ability of perception.

"I can say 'blue' to you and I will mean what I mean, but you will hear 'blue' and think what you think it means," he said.

"Putting our blues together makes something happen, something palpably more."

Ríos suggested the name Ekphrasis for the project, a Greek word summed up in a "verbal description of a visual work of art, either real or imagined." 

A Sonnet of Images 
Ekphrasis.  Translation.  Conversation.

Click on the words below to jump down to that week's photo and poem:

1. In you I have the future...    2. Orange...    3. I play the game...    4. I stretch... 

 

 

graduation

1.
In you, I hug the future.
I hold to me the arms of what is going to happen.

I embrace the next edge of civilization,
The farthest forward we as human beings have ventured.

These robes we are wearing are not clothing—
They are the gift-wrapping of everything we know. 

I hold you tight.  I smile through the beautifully curled hair 
Of you.  I put my two hands

On the back of you.  Future,
I want to hold you like there’s no tomorrow— 

Which means, of course, that this tight hug,
Even if I cannot say it, is all tomorrow.

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orange splatter 

2. 
Orange. 
In the dictionaries the earliest uses of the word in English refer to the fruit, that the

Color was later named after the fruit. Before the English-speaking world was exposed to the
Fruit, the color was referred to as “yellow-red” (geoluread in Old English) or “red-yellow.”

The word comes to us from late Middle English: from Old French orenge (in the phrase
Pomme d'orenge), based on Arabic naranj, from Persian narang.

So what, I say.
Do you dance? I ask, but I don’t wait— 

I spin you on the dance floor and watch your dress
Make the brilliant mark of the hard tango turn,

The scribbled signature of urgency made with the body,
The mark left that says I was here, in this moment, in this place.

I was here, that orange says, loudly and so much that to say anything more
We must turn to a next page.  This page, this moment—it is done.

-Back to Top- 

 

 child on carpet

3.
I play the game and am the game.  I play chess
And am the knight.  I play the cube

And turn, somehow, yellow into red,
Dream orange into green.  I am the game

Right now and yesterday, right now
And tomorrow.  I am the player and the board both

Trying everything to win.
Winning is a candy in my mouth. 

I lie on the bed of the game.
I am the game of me.

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yoga in the museum 

4.
I stretch among the museum’s images,
Bend my body to their inclinations,

Try out orange and precipice,
Hold the sun and poke the eye of green. 

I stretch.  I grow among the images
And in answer to my lean 

They move themselves for me.  These paintings
And me, we are in this place together.

 -Back to Top-

 
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CPR/AED certification and awareness may save lives

February 20, 2017

Heart Health Awareness Month underscores automated external defibrillator training at Arizona State University.

Anyone may use an AED to analyze a heart rhythm and, if necessary, deliver an electrical shock to re-establish a rhythm in an abnormal or stopped heart. The AED machine talks to the user and gives step by step instructions. 

 

Public-access AEDs are located in common areas of many university buildings such as first-floor corridors, near the main restrooms or by elevators.

AEDs are also located in:

  • Athletic venues
  • ASU Police vehicles
  • Fulton Center
  • New or renovated buildings since 2007
  • Residential halls
  • Student unions 

View more than 300 ASU AED locations.

“In an emergency, call 911 and use the CPR/AED skills we teach in our awareness classes,” said Alex Gutierrez, ASU’s AED program manager. “AED training may help you save someone’s life.”

To use an AED, you don’t need to be certified. Environmental Health and Safety offers in-person CPR/AED awareness training. If you want to be certified, Sun Devil Fitness hosts CPR/AED certification and ASU partner Emergency University offers online CPR/AED certification.

AED devices save lives

Geography senior Josh Groth works at the Tempe Sun Devil Fitness Center as an aquatic student coordinator. He also taught an AED/CPR and First Aid certification classes. He said certification gives confidence in emergency situations and that the training is easy to complete. 

“The certification class is only about four hours long, and it’s a great mix of hands-on practice and information,” Groth said. “The instructors are invested in getting participants certified, so there is plenty of help during classes.”

For anyone at ASU who would like to take an awareness training, a certified CPR/AED instructor leads EHS’s free, 90-minute awareness training, but it will not result in certification. Participants learn chest compression CPR and how to use an AED.

ASU is recognized by the Arizona Department of Health Services as a Heart Safe organization. Visit the EHS AED webpage for more information. 

Peter Northfelt

Editor assistant, Business and Finance Communications Group

480-727-4059