image title

Crew members sink ‘Teeth’ into new Herberger production

50 props, 5 types of stage blood, 300 sound/light cues in "Feathers and Teeth."
Student-produced retro comedy-thriller opens Oct. 28 at ASU.
October 11, 2016

ASU student play has less than 2 weeks before opening night; crew hard at work at set design, fight choreography and more

Editor's note: This is the third installment of a semester-long series following the production of "Feathers and Teeth" from casting call to wrap party. Look for the next story soon.

It has been four weeks since the actors on “Feathers and Teeth” received their scripts.

Every night since then, they’ve been working hard to get down their dialogue, coordinate their movements and hit their marks.

Behind the scenes, another group has been working equally hard to get the play ready: the 26-member crew whose numbers quintuple the small cast.

“There’s a stereotype that abounds regarding directors where they are sitting in a canvas chair and barking orders at the actors,” said Ricky Araiza, the director of “Feathers and Teeth,”“Feathers and Teeth” is a retro comedy-thriller. The plot follows Chris, a 13-year-old who suspects foul play when her father hooks up with an attractive home-care nurse two months after the death of her mother, Ellie. Set in a Rust Belt factory town in 1978, the play combines the supernatural with classic rock, family dysfunction and gremlin-like creatures that roam the house’s crawl space. an upcoming play that will debut in Tempe on Oct. 28. Araiza is a third-year master of fine arts student in Arizona State University’s School of Film, Dance and TheatreThe School of Film, Dance and Theatre is a unit of the Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts.; the play will serve as the equivalent of his master’s thesis.

“The best metaphor I can use is that a director is the captain of a ship. A captain doesn’t do everything on the boat, but he has to know how to delegate to get everyone on the same path and heading in the right direction.”

The ship has about two weeks before it sets sail. If Araiza is nervous, he isn’t showing it to his crew, a mixture of stage veterans and rookies who are working on their first production.

They’ll cover design and construction of the sets, sound and lighting, special effects, props, makeup, wardrobe, choreography and publicity.

“It really does take a village to put on a production,” said Jamie MacPherson, a 28-year-old MFA student in the School of Film, Dance and Theatre and the play’s fight choreographer.

MacPherson, who has worked on close to 25 stage productions, said the play has “five major moments of violence.” She said for every minute of action there’s about an hour of blocking and preparation.

MacPherson looks at three things before choreographing a fight: What does the stage look like? What does the script call for, and what are the actor’s instincts when they pull a punch for the first time?

“I also have to know what kind of costume will they be wearing, and if it includes jewelry,” MacPherson said. “And wigs are always a fun problem.”

Costume designer Andres Marin and makeup artist Macaley Fields said they’re having a blast working together on getting a look and feel for the era — the flashy and flamboyant ’70s. Marin did a photo search of the decade to research color patterns and prints, while Fields leafed through old copies of “Cosmopolitan.”

“What better magazine to consult for hair, style and makeup trends at that time?” said Fields, a design major working on her first stage production.

Technical director Anthony Lee said although he’s having fun, he’s under intense deadline pressure. This is also the 19-year-old sophomore’s first experience with an official stage production. He and about 20 other students from THP 231: Scenic Construction will build nine pieces of furniture — three wall units, five hanging windows and a mobile crawl space that can be wheeled on and off stage.

Lee will receive a lot of his cues from set designer Rhea Solanki, a 20-year-old junior majoring in theater, production and design. Solanki said playwright Charise Castro Smith’s writing is visual, and she wants the set to look like a combination of “Gremlins” and “The Brady Bunch.”

Because of the limited space where the play will take place,Nelson Fine Arts Center, Room 133. designing the set had its challenges, she said.

“Because there are classes that take place in this room during the week, the set had to be compact enough to be stored away and at the same time would work for the play,” Solanki said.

Despite its proclamation as an intimate show, “Feathers and Teeth” will feature more than 50 props, dozens of pieces of furniture, approximately 300 sound and lighting cues, five different types of stage blood and a few special effects that Araiza won’t reveal until opening night.

“Ensemble is very important to me,” said Araiza. “Yes, I came in with a vision, but it’s not my piece of art.

“These are the folks that really bring the image of the play together.”

 

Read more

Part 1: Anything goes at ‘Feathers and Teeth’ casting call” 

Part 2:Building chemistry among a new cast

 

Top photo: Technical director Anthony Lee tacks the facing on one of the three 8-foot-tall walls for the staging for "Feathers and Teeth" Oct. 11 on the Tempe campus. Photo by Charlie Leight/ASU Now

Reporter , ASU Now

480-727-5176

Pick Six!: Interception Returns for Touchdowns Under Todd Graham


October 11, 2016

Over the course of Todd Graham's tenure, the Sun Devil defense has made pivotal plays that have altered the outcomes of games. The Sun Devils made a statement against Cal after the team recorded their 14th pick-six under Graham, the most in FBS in that timespan (2012-2016). Download Full Image