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Ford names ASU a top-tier recruiting and hiring institution.
ASU's engineering and business minds catch Ford's interest.
June 14, 2016

Carmaker designates ASU as a premier school, joining nearly 40 major corporations that rank the university high for recruiting

Ford Motor Company is turning to Arizona State University to turbocharge its ranks of engineers and business minds. This week, the legendary automaker named ASU a premier school and a top-tier Ford recruiting and hiring institution.

The new designation puts ASU alongside MIT, Notre Dame, UC Berkeley, Purdue and a crew of other prestigious schools in Ford’s premier status.

Ford joins nearly 40 major corporations that have elevated ASU to an elite designation in recruiting: Internet pioneers like Yelp and GoDaddy, financial powerhouses Vanguard and Charles Schwab, insurance leaders Geico and State Farm, as well as Mayo Clinic and American Airlines are among those who have increased the flow in their pipeline of talent from ASU.

Ford, with a history spanning the Model T to modern hybrids, taps into the career centers at ASU’s nationally ranked Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering and W. P. Carey School of Business. Cindy Parnell, executive director of ASU Career Services, anticipates an increase in students recruited and hired by Ford in the coming academic year.

“ASU’s national rankings, graduation rates and research enterprise have been rising for a decade,” Parnell said. “The companies and organizations shaping the future economy have noticed.”

Premier schools meet criteria set by Ford such as school quality, top externally ranked curriculums, talent pool size and diversity. ASU is focused on expanding access to a quality education, a principle that has helped build a diverse student population across its five metropolitan Phoenix campus locations.

Ford has recruited Sun Devils for many years. Steve Papanikolas, Ford’s lead recruiter at ASU, said ASU recruits are some of the best.
 
“Elevating ASU to a premier school will allow us to deepen our connection with the Sun Devil community and enable Ford to continue to attract the best and brightest ASU has to offer,” Papanikolas said.

“ASU’s national rankings, graduation rates and research enterprise have been rising for a decade. The companies and organizations shaping the future economy have noticed.”
— Cindy Parnell, executive director of ASU Career Services

Expanded access has elevated the quality of the programs at ASU, producing master learners who are prepared to adapt to economic and global change. W. P. Carey School of Business fields world-renowned faculty representing six continents, and partner corporations at the top of the NYSE and NASDAQ help keep the curriculum sharp and up to date. The school develops problem-solving business leaders geared toward positive change, qualities that are highly sought by major corporations.

The National Science Foundation recently made the Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering one of only two universities in the nation to be awarded a second, prestigious Engineering Research Center. And team of students is building a Formula-style race car for a competition that will be eyed by Tesla, Chrysler and Ford. They are among the robot-builders and rocket scientists, the doers and creators at the Fulton Schools who annually draw inquiries from top recruiters.

 

Top photo: Mike Conard grinds down intake supports for the Formula-style race car he and other students built for a national competition taking place this week. Conard recently graduated and will head to Michigan for a job with Ford later this summer. Read the latest installment about Conard and his teammates' efforts to design and build their car here

 
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Camp at ASU shows how gadgets can help make science a hot topic for students.
K-12 teachers inspired by geography camp at ASU.
June 15, 2016

Arizona Geographic Alliance at ASU motivates K-12 educators with projects incorporating science, social studies

Kids might not love to study rocks, but they gravitate to gadgets and that’s one way to engage them in learning science.

A group of K-12 teachers spent half an hour during a hot afternoon this week pointing infrared thermometers at parking lots, patches of grass, benches, stop signs, cars and various other objects.

“So the rubber was hotter than the metal,” noted Madeline Goodman as she and Genevieve Conn (pictured at top) logged the temperatures of bicycles in a rack.

Goodman and Conn were among 18 educators who are spending part of their summer break at the Science, Technology, Engineering, Math and Social Studies Institute on the Tempe campus of Arizona State University.

The institute, like a science summer camp for teachers, is sponsored by the Arizona Geographic Alliance, which is housed at ASU.

The sessions mix geography with the STEM disciplines and include topics such as “Let’s Plan a Road Trip,” “Using Forensic Science to Investigate the Disappearance of Ancient Rome’s Ninth Legion” and “Is It Good or Is It Bad: Genetically Modified Foods.” The teachers hear speakers, create projects and make site visits.

The session with the thermometers was led by Nancy Selover, the state’s climatologist and a research professor in the School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning.

Nancy Selover
Nancy Selover talks about urban heat islands to the teachers attending the Science, Technology, Engineering, Math and Social Studies Institute at ASU. Photo by Charlie Leight/ASU Now

 

She discussed urban heat islands, how different objects hold heat and how to measure it.

“These are fun things, and kids love them,” she said, holding up the thermometers, which actually measure the thermal radiation of objects.

“I say to a kid, ‘Should you wear a black T-shirt?’ And he says, ‘Black is cool’ and I say, ‘Well, take the temperature of it and see how cool it is.’

“They can go to a parking lot and take the temperatures of different-colored cars. Then they start thinking about how all those things matter.”

Goodman, a kindergarten teacher at Capitol Elementary School in the Phoenix Elementary School District, said her students would love a chance to study outside.

“I would do this in small-group setting and have them sort out hot and not and talk about what things were hotter and where were they,” she said.

“Kindergarten is really about teaching children how to read, letter sounds and letter sense, so we don’t have a lot of time for social studies and science,” Goodman said. “I’ve gotten so many ideas that I can incorporate into my practice.”

Gale Ekiss, the co-coordinator of the Arizona Geographic Alliance, said that this is the third year for the institute but the first time that teachers could attend for free, thanks to funding from the APS Foundation. The new grant paid a small stipend to each attendee, covered housing for teachers from outside of the Valley and will allow the teachers to attend conferences later this year to present the lesson plans they develop.

The Arizona Geographic Alliance is a non-profit group that promotes education about geography, including sponsoring the Geographic Bee for schoolchildren. Funded by grants from the National Geographic Society, the alliance is housed in ASU’s School of Geographical Sciences and Urban PlanningThe School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning is an academic unit of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences..

Ekiss said that geography is a bridge between the STEM subjects and social studies.

Madeline Goodman and Genevieve Conn
Madeline Goodman (left), a kindergarten teacher at Capitol Elementary School in Phoenix, and Genevieve Conn, an ASU student who is majoring in secondary education and minoring in geography, note the temperatures of objects using an infrared thermometer. They attended the Science, Technology, Engineering, Math and Social Studies Institute this week at ASU. Photo by Charlie Leight/ASU Now

 

“Geography has two major divisions — cultural, which is learning about countries and traditions and patterns of migration, and physical, where you have hydrology and geomorphology, which is earthquakes.

“There’s a vast array of science, math and engineering on the physical side, and the cultural side uses statistics and math when they look at graphs and trends,” she said.

The teachers will use the sessions to create open-access lesson plansThe lesson plans will include ways to strengthen STEM skills in students who are English language learners. that will be on the Arizona Geographic Alliance’s website.

Alison Oswald-Keene, a teacher at Terramar School in the Deer Valley Unified School District, said the camp is one way to enliven lessons.

“I teach seventh grade, and my standards for science are earth science. You’re talking plate tectonics, volcanism,” she said.

“I try to bring some of these social studies lessons in to make it interesting for my seventh-graders, who really don’t care about dirt and rocks and minerals.”

Top photo: Genevieve Conn, an ASU student who is majoring in secondary education and minoring in geography, takes a reading from an infrared thermometer at the Science, Technology, Engineering, Math and Social Studies Institute on the Tempe campus this week. Conn attended the session because she wants to be a high school science teacher. Photo by Charlie Leight/ASU Now

Mary Beth Faller

reporter , ASU Now

480-727-4503