Press Releases

Cronkite School Honoring Judy Woodruff, Gwen Ifill at Cronktite Award Luncheon


Arizona State University’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication is presenting Judy Woodruff and the late Gwen Ifill, the award-winning co-anchors and managing editors of the “PBS NewsHour,” with the Walter Cronkite Award for Excellence in Journalism Thursday, Oct. 19.

Woodruff will receive the 34th Cronkite Award at a special luncheon celebration at the Sheraton Grand Phoenix hotel in downtown Phoenix. The annual Cronkite Award Luncheon has become one of the most anticipated events in the Valley, attracting more than 1,000 industry leaders from the worlds of media, politics, business and education each year. Download Full Image

Who: Judy Woodruff, anchor and managing editor of the “PBS NewsHour”

What: 34th annual Cronkite Award Luncheon

When: Thursday, Oct. 19, 2017, from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Where: Sheraton Grand Phoenix, 340 N. Third St., Phoenix, AZ 85004

Photographers and videographers will have the opportunity to approach the stage to shoot close-ups of the award presentation at a designated time during the luncheon.

Media space is limited; contact Cronkite School Communications Manager Joe Giordano at joe.giordano@asu.edu to reserve a space.

FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT:
Meenah Rincon, Media Relations Officer
Phone: (480) 727-3116
Email: herminia.rincon@asu.edu

 

About Judy Woodruff
Judy Woodruff is the award-winning anchor and managing editor of the “PBS NewsHour.” For more than four decades, she has covered politics and major news stories at CNN, NBC and PBS.

At the “PBS NewsHour,” Woodruff leads a newscast that millions of Americans and citizens of the world turn to for solid, reliable reporting that has made it one of the most trusted news programs on television. She was co-anchor and co-managing editor at the “PBS NewsHour” with the late Gwen Ifi ll from 2013-2016.

Woodruff served as the chief Washington correspondent for “The MacNeil/Lehrer NewsHour” from 1983-1993. She also anchored PBS’ award-winning weekly documentary series “Frontline with Judy Woodruff” from 1984-1990.

Before coming to PBS, Woodruff was anchor and senior correspondent at CNN, where she anchored the political news program “Inside Politics” for 12 years. She also was the White House correspondent for NBC News from 1977-1982. She shared her experiences in the 1982 book “This is Judy Woodruff at the White House.”

About Gwen Ifill (1955-2016)
Gwen Ifill was the award-winning co-anchor and co-managing editor of the “PBS News-Hour” with Judy Woodruff and the moderator and managing editor of “Washington Week,” the longest-running prime-time news and public affairs program on television.

Ifill was a veteran political reporter in Washington, covering eight presidential elections and moderating the vice presidential debates in 2004 and 2008. For her coverage of the 2008 presidential election on “Washington Week,” she was the recipient of a prestigious George Foster Peabody Award.

Ifill joined both “Washington Week” and “PBS NewsHour” in 1999, interviewing newsmakers and reporting on issues ranging from foreign affairs to politics. She was known for her ability to ask tough questions and hold people in power accountable.

She was the author of the 2009 book “The Breakthrough: Politics and Race in the Age of Obama,” which shed light on the impact of Barack Obama’s 2008 presidential victory and the emerging young African-American politicians of that time. Ifill died in November 2016.

About the Cronkite Award Luncheon
The Cronkite Award Luncheon is the Cronkite School’s signature fundraising event, providing crucial support for the school’s professional programs that train the next generation of journalism and media leaders.

Other Cronkite Award recipients have included TV news anchors Scott Pelley, Diane Sawyer and Robin Roberts; newspaper journalists Ben Bradlee, Helen Thomas and Bob Woodward; and media executives Katharine Graham, Al Neuharth and Bill Paley. Cronkite personally presented the award during its first quarter-century. The CBS News anchor died in 2009.

The Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication was named in Cronkite’s honor in 1984.

 About ASU
Arizona State University has developed a new model for the American Research University, creating an institution that is committed to access, excellence and impact. ASU measures itself by those it includes, not by those it excludes. As the prototype for a New American University, ASU pursues research that contributes to the public good, and ASU assumes major responsibility for the economic, social and cultural vitality of the communities that surround it.

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communications coordinator, Media Relations and Strategic Communications

Press Releases

“Everything Will Be Different”: Phoenix as a City of the Future


(CEOs for Cities to explore metro Phoenix as a living laboratory for experimentation, reinvention and continuous change) 

Tempe, Ariz., (October 9, 2017) From Oct. 30 to Nov. 1, Phoenix will host 350 cross-sector leaders from 75 cities across North America to explore Phoenix as an innovative experiment in urban development. Attendees to the CEOs for Cities national event will include mayors and other elected and appointed officials, business and civic leaders, foundation executives, college and university presidents, entrepreneurs and nonprofit leaders. Download Full Image

The multi-day meeting, titled “Everything’s Going to Be Different: Creating the Future City,” will showcase many site-specific projects and interactive events for a program dedicated to the macro forces that are shaping both Phoenix and the country as a whole. The organizers believe there may be no better backdrop for such a conversation than the city of Phoenix—a place still in a process of becoming, a living laboratory for experimentation, reinvention and continuous change.

Taking advantage of Phoenix as a place of extremes, the multi-day event will explore sustainability in addition to other topics, such as rapid urbanization, demographic change, education leading to innovation, and arts + culture. The meeting begins on October 30 with a special pre-session at the prestigious Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication entitled “Civic Discourse, Truth and the Future of Journalism.”

October 31 features sessions including “The Partnerships That Make Cities the Centers of Innovation” (with Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton), “I-10 Cities as a Window on the Future,”  “Cities: An Antidote to Our Flawed Democracy?” and on November 1, “Building Community: Place, Education and the Arts.” The meeting program presents a mix of local, regional and national experts.

November 1 closes with a keynote luncheon presentation by Richard Florida, the renowned urbanist best known for his book “The Rise of the Creative Class” and author of the recently published “The New Urban Crisis.” Tickets are available for the full conference and the Richard Florida keynote.

The events will take place at the Renaissance Downtown Phoenix Hotel (100 N. 1st St.) and ASU’s Beus Center for Law and Society. Additional information and the full agenda can be found here.

Prior to Oct. 30, Wellington (Duke) Reiter will be available for interviews. He is senior advisor to the president of Arizona State University, executive director of ASU’s University City Exchange and one of the principal organizers of this event.

FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT:
Nikai Salcido
Communications Coordinator 
Nikai.Salcido@asu.edu

Steven Beschloss
Director of Executive Communications & Strategic Initiatives
Steven.Beschloss@asu.edu
 

About ASU
Arizona State University has developed a new model for the American Research University, creating an institution that is committed to access, excellence and impact. ASU measures itself by those it includes, not by those it excludes. As the prototype for a New American University, ASU pursues research that contributes to the public good, and ASU assumes major responsibility for the economic, social and cultural vitality of the communities that surround it.

 

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communications coordinator, Media Relations and Strategic Communications

Press Releases

Local Media Invited to Tour ASU's Polytechnic Campus


Arizona State University is hosting a media day at our Polytechnic Campus. Local and state media will get a firsthand look at some of the exciting research at ASU’s Polytechnic Campus. During this event, members of the media will have the opportunity to tour three robotics laboratories at ASU’s Technology Center and the ASU bee lab, which attracts researchers from around the world. By attending, you will learn about some of the advanced technologies being developed in ASU labs and how researchers are gaining insight into the actions and behaviors of bees. Faculty and students will be on hand to talk about their research. Cameras are welcomed. 


  Download Full Image

When: Tuesday, October 24, 2017; 9:00am-12:00pm.

Where: ASU Polytechnic Campus; 7001 E Williams Field Rd, Mesa, AZ 85212

RSVP: If you are interested in attending, please RSVP by October 9, 2017. 

FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT:
Nikai Salcido
Communications Coordinator
Arizona State University 
Nikai.Salcido@asu.edu

communications coordinator, Media Relations and Strategic Communications

Press Releases

Maximize student financial aid: Apply before ASU’s priority deadline


Tempe, Ariz., October 4, 2017 – U.S. high school graduates left more than $2.9 billion in free federal grant money on the table in 2013-2014 according to an analysis by NerdWallet. Their mistake? Not completing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA).

“Money continues to be left unclaimed year after year simply because not enough students are applying for federal aid,” said Melissa Pizzo, Arizona State University’s assistant vice president for Enrollment Services. Download Full Image

As of Sunday, October 1, the FAFSA is now available for the 2018-2019 school year.

When it comes to financial aid, Arizona State University is dedicated to helping students find as much funding as possible. ASU students received more than $633M in gift aid in the 2015-2016 academic year, which consists of federal, institutional and/or private funds, as a result of submitting a FAFSA.

"Every student's financial situation is unique, but there's one piece of advice that applies to all — submitting a FAFSA is critical to ensuring your financial wellness. More than 80 percent of all ASU students receive some form of financial assistance every year, which emphasizes the impact a FAFSA has in funding a student's education,” said Pizzo.

Current and new students who plan on attending ASU in fall 2018 are encouraged to file a FAFSA today.

Last year, the state of Arizona had the third highest jump in FAFSA submissions of those participating in the FAFSA Completion Challenge. The recent annual report from The Institute for College Access and Success identified average rates of student loans debt across the nation, and Arizona was listed among the five states with the lowest loan debt

Unlike past years, this is the second year where students do not have to wait to file taxes to complete the FAFSA. Students can use last year’s tax returns (FY 2016) to complete the FAFSA for the incoming school year.

Students will need to provide information about themselves and their financial situation. Having the following information or documents on-hand will help.

  • Social Security number
  • Federal tax information or tax returns
  • Records of untaxed income
  • Cash, banking balances, investments and assets
  • FSA ID (yours plus a parent’s if you plan to use their tax information)
  • ASU Federal School Code: 001081

In addition to federal student aid options, ASU offers Arizona residents financial aid based on information provided on the FAFSA. Learn more about ASU’s financial aid programs by visiting https://students.asu.edu/financialaid/types/special

FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT:
Meenah Rincon, Office of Media Relations & Strategic Communications
Phone: 480-727-3116
Email: herminia.rincon@asu.edu

About ASU
Arizona State University has developed a new model for the American Research University, creating an institution that is committed to access, excellence and impact. ASU measures itself by those it includes, not by those it excludes. As the prototype for a New American University, ASU pursues research that contributes to the public good, and ASU assumes major responsibility for the economic, social and cultural vitality of the communities that surround it.

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communications coordinator, Media Relations and Strategic Communications

Press Releases

NOT AN OLD PRESS RELEASE: ASU RANKED NO. 1 IN INNOVATION AGAIN


THIRD STRAIGHT YEAR EACH YEAR THE RANKING HAS EXISTED, ASU HAS WON IT

Tempe, Ariz., September 12, 2017 — For the third year in a row, Arizona State University tops the list of “most innovative schools” in the nation, recognizing the university’s ground-breaking initiatives, partnerships, programs and research. Download Full Image

U.S. News and World Report has named ASU as the most innovative university all three years it’s had the category. The widely touted set of annual rankings by the news magazine, which compares more than 1,500 institutions on a variety of metrics, was released today.

ASU again topped the list based on a survey of peers. College presidents, provosts and admissions deans around the country nominated up to 10 colleges or universities that are making the most innovative improvements to curriculum, faculty, students, campus life, technology or facilities.

“Our colleagues at colleges and universities around the country are very interested in what we’re doing, and they pay close attention to all that we have been able to achieve,” Michael M. Crow, ASU’s president, said. “They know that all the cool stuff is going on at ASU.”

After ASU, the second and third most innovative universities were Stanford and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the same ranking as the previous two years. The next universities on the innovative list are Georgia State University, Carnegie Mellon University, Northeastern University, the University of Maryland at Baltimore County, the University of Michigan and Harvard University, with Duke and Portland State universities tied for 10th place.

The innovation ranking is due at least in part to a more than 80 percent improvement in ASU’s graduation rate in the last 15 years, the fact that the ASU is the fastest growing research university in the country and the emphasis on inclusion and student success that has led to more than 50 percent of the school’s in-state freshmen coming from minority backgrounds.

“We now know that because of our innovation platform and our innovation culture, we’re just getting started,” Crow said. “Our pace of innovation is not just continuing, it’s accelerating.” 

In addition, the magazine designated ASU as an “A+ School for B Students,” a list of universities that are not ranked. Schools on the list had to admit a meaningful proportion of applicants whose test scores and class standing put them in non-A territory but whose freshmen retention rate was at least 75 percent.

The “most innovative school” ranking wasn’t the result of any one specific program, but the holistic approach to inventing a new kind of university ASU has undertaken. Still, ASU has launched several recent unique initiatives. Here are a few:

Innovation in student experience: This semester, ASU opened the Fulton Schools Residential Community at Tooker House, a dorm for engineering students with a maker lab and “smart campus” technologies including Amazon Echo Dot devices, making it the first voice-enabled residence hall at a university.

Innovation in partnerships: The new adidas/ASU Digital Education Partnership will provide scholarships to 100 adidas employees as part of the Global Sport Alliance, a collaboration that will shape the future of sport.

Innovation in well-being: The new Center for Mindfulness, Compassion and Resilience will bring together researchers, practitioners and educators to study and spread ideas. The center, launched with a $1 million donation, is led by Teri Pipe, ASU’s chief well-being officer.

Innovation in the Sun Devil experience: ASU won the first-ever “Best Game Day Technology Experience” Award for its cutting-edge “Smart Campus” initiative, which uses the “internet of things” to generate data and alert the crowd on things like where to park and which exit to use.

Innovation in teaching and learning: EdPlus at ASU is a dedicated digital teaching and learning laboratory which will engage in deep learning analytics, providing continuous program improvement ultimately resulting in student success, such as adaptive learning technologies that help students correct mistakes by identifying misunderstood core concepts and training them on a fix.

Innovation in the arts: Adam Collis, a professor of film in the Herberger Institute of Design and the Arts, created Film Spark, a program based at the ASU California Center in Santa Monica that helps students launch a career in the film industry. Collis directed “Car Dogs,” a feature film financed, created and released in the Valley, with 85 students working on the crew.

Innovation in impactful research: ASU scientist Rolf Halden’s research into antimicrobials resulted in a brand-new federal ban on personal-care products that contain triclosan and triclocarbon. Halden, director of ASU’s Biodesign Center for Environmental Health Engineering, started the research in 2002.

Innovation in entrepreneurship: ASU launched “Prepped,” a free six-week program for local food start-ups to learn about finance, food safety and other topics. The course is part of the Office of Entrepreneurship and Innovation, which also disperses tens of thousands of dollars in funding to student start-ups.

Innovation in leadership: The new School of Civic and Economic Thought and Leadership aims to create a new kind of leader, blending tradition and innovation, and exploring questions of freedom and governance. It’s the 18th transdisciplinary school launched at ASU.

FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT:
Bret Hovell
480-965-3502
mediarelations@asu.edu

To schedule an interview or live broadcast from our radio/HDTV studio on campus, or to receive a press kit with print and broadcast quality photography, reach out to Bret Hovell using the above-listed contact information.

About ASU
Arizona State University has developed a new model for the American Research University, creating an institution that is committed to access, excellence and impact. ASU measures itself by those it includes, not by those it excludes. As the prototype for a New American University, ASU pursues research that contributes to the public good, and ASU assumes major responsibility for the economic, social and cultural vitality of the communities that surround it.

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communications coordinator, Media Relations and Strategic Communications

Press Releases

IT Awareness Day: ASU, Cisco Team Up to Fill 17,000 Arizona Jobs


Tempe, Ariz., Sept. 12, 2017 Arizona State University in partnership with Cisco will sponsor an IT Awareness Day Thursday, Sept. 14, from 1 – 7 p.m. inside the Tempe Campus Memorial Union, to provide insight into the more than 17,000 open information technology jobs in Arizona.

While this event was designed with military veterans in mind, it is free and open to the public. Anyone who has special interest in this growing industry is welcome to attend any or all events.  Doors open at 1 p.m. with opening presentations beginning promptly at 1:15 p.m. Download Full Image

Attendees will get inside tips, access to resources, hear from hiring managers and prominent members of the community and tech sector. Panelists will provide insight into trends in IT and STEM, work culture and a look at what the future holds for professionals in IT within the state of Arizona.

Event registration is encouraged.  For a full schedule of panelists, locations and to register, go to the ASU website and type “IT Awareness Day” on the search bar.  The link is: 

https://eoss.asu.edu/cs/students/asu-it-awareness-day

Those unable to attend in person can watch a live stream at:

https://asunow.asu.edu/asulive

The IT Awareness Day will be followed up with the Arizona Roadmap Hiring Event Nov. 10 in the Phoenix Convention Center, where job seekers can be pre-matched with jobs and potentially have interview on the day of the event.  Preregistration for that event can also be done through the previously mentioned link or by going directly to:

http://arizonaroadmapnov17.militaryhiringevents.com/

FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT:
Jerry Gonzalez, Media Relations Officer
Phone: (480)-727-7914 Mobile:  (202) 352-2834
Email: gerardo.gonzalez@asu.edu

About Arizona State University

Arizona State University has developed a new model for the American Research University, creating an institution that is committed to access, excellence and impact. ASU measures itself by those it includes, not by those it excludes. As the prototype for a New American University, ASU pursues research that contributes to the public good, and ASU assumes major responsibility for the economic, social and cultural vitality of the communities that surround it.

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communications coordinator, Media Relations and Strategic Communications

Press Releases

ASU to present free conference to help families prepare for college success


What: Future Sun Devil Family Day

Who: More than 500 middle and high school students and parents from the Central Phoenix area are expected to attend the half-day program.

When: Saturday, Sept. 16, 2017 | 8:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

Where: ASU Downtown Phoenix campus | 411 N. Central Ave., Phoenix, AZ 85004 Download Full Image

It’s never too early to plan for college. That's why Arizona State University is inviting middle and high school students and parents from across the Valley to Future Sun Devil Family (FSDF) Day: a free half-day college prep conference. FSDF Day equips parents and students with the critical information needed to pursue higher education and achieve college success.

Through a series of fun, interactive workshops, FSDF Day presenters address frequently asked questions regarding financial aid, admission requirements and the steps students should take during high school to be prepared to succeed in college. The workshops will be presented in English and Spanish.

The event will also feature campus tours, opportunities to talk with current students, and an appearance by Sparky. Participants will receive an ASU gift bag. 

The event is free and open to the public. Visitors can RSVPhere, https://eoss.asu.edu/fsdf.

FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT:
Diana Bejarano, Educational Outreach & Student Services
Phone: (480) 965-1604
Email:
diana.bejarano@asu.edu

About Access ASU

Access ASU is dedicated to increasing access to higher education and preparing Arizona students for success. We partner with schools and community organizations to engage students, families and educators while building college readiness programs and resources to support students in their pursuit of a college degree.

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communications coordinator, Media Relations and Strategic Communications

Press Releases

AZLoop keeps pace, but doesn’t race, with top contenders in international competition to create the future of transportation


Lack of track time keeps AZLoop pod off SpaceX test track

  Download Full Image

Hawthorne, Calif., Aug. 27 – After spending thousands of hours and many sleepless nights building a high-speed pod, an Arizona State University-led team of some 100 college students from across Arizona placed among the top eight contenders in the SpaceX Hyperloop II Pod Competition today.

After a grueling week of technical reviews and tracks tests, only three teams earned the honor of propelling their pods down a 150-ft, I-beam track at SpaceX headquarters in Hawthorne today. The singular objective: build and test the fastest pod.

Eight teams met all the technical and safety requirements to compete, but five of those, including AZLoop, were unable to compete in the final round of testing due to lack of daylight and not enough time for all eight teams to complete trial runs in the SpaceX tube.

AZLoop – made up of engineering and business students from ASU, the ASU Thunderbird School of Management, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University in Prescott, and Northern Arizona University in Flagstaff – was one of three wholly U.S. teams to make the final eight. All eight teams were tied in points, but the testing schedule necessitated allowing only a few teams to conduct final readiness testing in the tube. The other U.S. teams were BadgerLoop from the University of Wisconsin at Madison and HyperXite from University of California, Irvine.

Paradigm, a team from Memorial University of Newfoundland and Labrador and Northeastern Boson University, did make the final three – but pressure issues in the tube prevented the team from making a full run, although it did achieve a speed of 90 km/hour.  The other two teams to make a competition run were WARRLoop from the Technical University of Munich in Germany, which achieved a record run of 324 km/hr,  and SwissLoop from ETH Zurich in Switzerland, which had two runs, reached 39 km/hr and experienced brake failure. 

“This year it is all about maximum speed,” said AZLoop Co-Lead Josh Kosar.  “And no crashes.”

"The team did an unbelievable job – going from essentially a standing start months ago to finishing near the top,” said Kyle Squires, dean of the Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering. “What they created was indeed an engineering feat, and the passion, energy, drive and commitment put forth by everyone was amazing. My hope is that this experience empowers and inspires these students and others to continue to push the limits on innovation.”

Hyperloop is a conceptual, high-speed mode of transportation introduced in 2012 by SpaceX Founder Elon Musk. Hyperloop pods, Musk proposed, would levitate on I-beam tracks at speeds of up to 700 mph in a partial vacuum inside a continuous tube. Musk originally planned an aboveground route from Los Angeles to San Francisco; he is now developing plans to build an underground Hyperloop tube from New York City to Washington, D.C.  

Although the AZLoop team has been working toward today’s run for two years, AZLoop went into hyper drive in April when it learned that it was one of 24 teams – from an initial field of more than 1000 – to be selected to bring a pod to SpaceX to compete. 

Designs were submitted, reviewed, refined and reviewed in exchanges with SpaceX that ultimately resulted in an invitation to compete. “We are extremely impressed with your design and are excited to see what you will build,” said SpaceX in a letter to the team on March 31.

And that’s when the AZLoop Hyperloop pod development began in earnest.

In a move not undertaken by any other team competing in the competition, AZLoop partnered with ASU engineering alum Chris Kmetty, a construction engineering manager at Markham Contracting Co. Inc., to build an open-air, 150-foot test track on ASU’s Polytechnic Campus. Markham provided the materials and labor, and ASU provided the venue. 

“Other teams have 10- or 20-foot tracks to test braking systems,” explained AZLoop Co-Lead Lynne Nethken.  “But no other team has had the opportunity to do on-track testing and refinements of all the pod’s components. That track definitely gave us an edge.”

Kmetty was such an AZLoop champion that he travelled as an advisor with the team to SpaceX for the competition.

To build this year’s Arizona team, Kosar and Nethken reached out to students across Arizona, attracting teammates from a range of majors, including almost all engineering disciplines, robotics, physics, astrobiology, marketing and business management.

“What’s really unique about our team is that we’re a conglomerate of schools across the state of Arizona,” said Nethken.  We’re competing in this so we can establish ourselves as an innovative, fantastic group of students that represent the State of Arizona.”

ASU is the primary AZLoop sponsor, providing the team’s lab on its Polytechnic Campus, securing the land and necessary permits for the track, and working with a range of sponsors to generate funding for the team – totaling in the range of $1 million.

“Our management team, the support we get from ASU, is undeniable. They really believe in the project,” said Earnest Poteat, team production manager. “It’s a direct relationship between the people that are supporting us from the top, and the leadership they’ve instilled here at this level.”

What’s next for AZLoop?  “We’ve got the right team, we’ve got the right backing, we’ve got the right resources. The timing is right,” said Kosar, noting that the team’s long-term goal is “to actually bring a Hyperloop [route] to Arizona.“

Nethken echoed Kosar’s thoughts. "We’ve considered AZLoop to be a multi-year project from the start,” said Nethken. “This competition enabled us to worked out the mechanics and pass all of the technical and safety tests – and now we have a track on which to perfect our systems going forward. 

"Most importantly, we are perfectly positioned to start working with municipalities and businesses in earnest to bring Hyperloop transit to Arizona."

Photos (and captions):

Team with Pod:  HAWTHORNE, CA - Aug. 27, 2017 - ASU Now - Hyperloop Competition - AZLoop team members pose with the pod for a group photo during the final round of the SpaceX Hyperloop Pod Competition on the SpaceX facilities in Hawthorne, CA, on Sunday, August 27, 2017. While the AZLoop team was one of the top point earners in a week of tests, it was not one of the three finalists to race in the 1.25-kilometer long Hyperloop vacuum chamber. Photo by Charlie Leight/ASU Now

COPYRIGHT: Copyright Arizona Board of Regents

Team in front of booth:  HAWTHORNE, CA - Aug. 27, 2017 - ASU Now - Hyperloop Competition - AZLoop team members pose with their pod during the final round of the SpaceX Hyperloop Pod Competition on the SpaceX facilities in Hawthorne, CA, on Sunday, August 27, 2017. Photo by Charlie Leight/ASU Now

COPYRIGHT: Copyright Arizona Board of Regents

Sharing Info with other teams: HAWTHORNE, CA - Aug. 27, 2017 - ASU Now - Hyperloop Competition - Alberto Ibernón, with the Universidad Politecnica de Valencia in Spain, looks over the AZLoop team's pod at the SpaceX Hyperloop Pod Competition on the SpaceX facilities in Hawthorne, CA, on Sunday, August 27, 2017. Photo by Charlie Leight/ASU Now

COPYRIGHT: Copyright Arizona Board of Regents

High Res photos here:

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/xg79m44wmy2lt64/AACgKQ6_Tw_jgoJ0poLdnkr6a?dl=0

Video Links:

Broll:

 AZLoop broll 7_15: https://vimeo.com/229440195

 AZLoop broll 3_31: https://vimeo.com/211049788

 AZLoop broll 3_31: https://vimeo.com/210856467

 AZLoop track broll: https://vimeo.com/230180480

Video Stories:

 AZLoop update video 6_30: https://vimeo.com/223847364

 AZLoop team advances 3_31: https://vimeo.com/211133230

 AZLoop braking system: https://vimeo.com/205113794

 AZLoop competition team: https://vimeo.com/204268606

 AZLoop pack for California: https://vimeo.com/230683281

 

FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT:
Terry Grant, Arizona State University
Theresa.Grant@asu.edu 
480-727-4058 (O)  (520) 907-2248 (C) 

communications coordinator, Media Relations and Strategic Communications

ASU In the News

ASU assistant research professor addresses kindergarten ‘redshirting’ with 12 News


Local NBC 12 News recently sought the expert advice of Arizona State University's Megan Pratt to address the controversy about delaying kids from kindergarten to ensure they’re mentally ready. This practice, known as redshirting, is a trend among parents who are faced with the decision to start their children in kindergarten at a younger or older age.

Pratt, an assistant research professor from the T. Denny School of Social and Family Dynamics, says redshirting a child from kindergarten may not help much in the long run but it’s different in the short term. See more from this interview with KPNX reporter, Jen Wahl, which aired on August 22, 2017. woman walking on campus Download Full Image

Article Source: 12 News
John Keeney

Communications Manager, T. Denny Sanford School of Social and Family Dynamics

480-965-3094

Press Releases

MEDIA ADVISORY: ASU AND ADIDAS TEAM UP FOR DISCUSSION ON YOUTH IN SPORTS


 

The event will address local, national, and international polices and how social economic barriers impact sports access and participation. Download Full Image

Tempe, Ariz., August 18, 2017 – On August 27, the day before the U.S. Open Tennis Tournament kicks off, the Global Sport Institute at ASU, along with adidas Brand Flagship store and New America NYC, will host a discussion on how tennis – and sport in general – can better serve diverse youth populations. Eric Legg is an ASU faculty member who specializes in youth and sport studies. Legg will lead the discussion while addressing how cultural and socioeconomic challenges impact participation.

What: Panel Discussion: “Get Out There and Play”

Who: Participants include:

  • Kenneth Shropshire – CEO, Global Sports Institute (opening remarks)
  • Katrina Adams – Chairman, CEO and President of USTA
  • Deborah Antoine – CEO, Women’s Sports Foundation
  • Noah Levine – Executive Director, SEED Project

When: Sunday August 27, 2017 11:00am ET

Where: adidas Brand Flagship New York, 5th Ave.
             565 5th Ave.
             10017 New York
             United States

RVSP: https://www.newamerica.org/nyc/events/get-out-there-play/

Live Stream: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SLhX-xP3n30

About Arizona State University

ASU is a New American University, promoting excellence in its research and among its students, faculty and staff, increasing access to its educational resources and working with communities to positively impact social and economic development.

About adidas

adidas is a global leader in the sporting goods industry. A designer and developer of athletic and lifestyle footwear, apparel and accessories, adidas has the mission to be the best sports brand in the world. Headquartered in Herzogenaurach, Germany and Portland, Ore., adidas employs more than 60,000 people across the globe and generated sales of € 19 billion in 2016.

About ASU Global Sport Institute

The Global Sport Institute supports interdisciplinary research and innovation that examines critical issues impacting sport and all those connected with sport—and then transforms the resulting findings into practical knowledge that can be widely shared. GSI is a key component of the adidas and Arizona State University Global Sport Alliance, a strategic partnership aimed at shaping the future of sport and expanding sport’s positive impact on society. The Global Sport Alliance brings together education, athletics, research and innovation.

FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT:
Steven Beschloss
Steven.Beschloss@asu.edu
480-727-3841

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