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One of largest Western film history collections goes on display

ASU-owned Western film collection to debut at Scottsdale's Museum of the West.
The Wild Wild West, as portrayed in film, will be on display in Scottsdale.
June 19, 2017

Acquired by ASU Foundation and Scottsdale's Museum of the West, Rennard Strickland Collection provides unique perspective

One of the largest collections of Western film memorabilia has found a home, appropriately, in the Southwest.

The Rennard Strickland Collection of Western Film History debuts tomorrow at Scottsdale's Museum of the West. The collection was acquired jointly last October by the museum and Arizona State University's Foundation for A New American University. More than 100 posters and lobby cards will be on display, out of the more than 5,000 in the collection, dating from the 1890s to the mid-1980s. The exhibit runs through Sept. 30, 2018.

“The collection, which numbers more than 5,000 works, represents Dr. Strickland’s passion for Western film and the extraordinary graphic abilities of artists from past to present,” chief curator Tricia Loscher said. "It's unique in that many stories about the posters and films are told from Dr. Strickland's perspective." 

Strickland, a professor at University of Oklahoma's College of Law, began to collect the memorabilia in the 1970s. He then passed the collection along to the Museum of the West and ASU to serve as a resource for the university's faculty and students. Strickland himself is of Osage and Cherokee heritage and an expert on Indian law.

Because many of the films were shot in the area, the move made plenty of sense. 

Test your Western film trivia below.

"We have brought his collection home," Loscher said. "This is one of the major centers of the Western region where film has been produced, and it is an honor and privilege for us that Dr. Strickland selected this partnership to see that his collection is shared by present and future generations from around the world."

To celebrate the acquisition, an event will be held for museum members from 5 to 7 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 26. Attendees will have the opportunity to view the exhibition and meet Strickland, Loscher, ASU President Michael Crow, museum director Mike Fox and others. 

Museum hours are 9:30 to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., Sunday. Closed Monday. (Thursday hours are extended to 9 p.m. Nov. through April.)

Admisison prices for the museum are: $13, adults; $11, seniors (65+) and active military; $8, students (full-time with ID) and children (6–17 years); free for members and children 5 and under.

For more information visit scottsdalemuseumwest.org.

Top photo: The Rennard Strickland Collection of Western Film History is on display at Western Spirit: Scottsdale's Museum of the West from June 20, 2017 to Sept. 30, 2018. Photo by Charlie Leight/ASU Now

 

 

Did you know? 

Only two Western films have ever received a “Best Picture” Academy Award (Oscar).

“Cimarron,” released in 1931; received the “Best Picture” Oscar in the same year.
An adaptation of Edna Ferber’s novel, it tells the story of a young woman who marries a drifter-gunfighter during the Oklahoma land rush, who go their separate ways. It starred Richard Dix and Irene Dunne.

“Dances with Wolves,” released in 1990, the film received the “Best Picture” Oscar in 1991.
A historical drama set during the U.S. Civil War, it tells the story of Union Army Officer Lieutenant John J. Dunbar and his relationship with a band of Sioux Indians. The film stars Kevin Costner.

 

Although hundreds of thousands of movie posters rolled off the presses, relatively few have survived.

Posters were shipped from theater to theater, and became worn, ragged and outdated. Paper drives during World War II emptied film-studio storage warehouses, making silent film posters particularly rare.

 

An 1889 Budweiser saloon poster of a painting entitled “Custer’s Last Fight” was the basis for movie poster art.

 

“Stagecoach” is considered one of the most important Western films ever made and one of Director John Ford’s greatest achievements.

It demonstrated to the Hollywood studios that there was a viable audience for Westerns films. It also rescued John Wayne from his B-picture status, propelling him to fame.

The historic drama, based on a short story by Ernest Haycox, is about a group of passengers traveling by stagecoach to the town of Lordsburg in the New Mexico Territory. Shot on location in northeastern Arizona’s Monument Valley, John Wayne plays Ringo Kid, an ex-con and the only one among the group who possesses the survival skills to keep them alive.

 

The earliest Westerns were filmed in New Jersey.

They derived from the Wild West shows that were touring the country in the late 1800s. California’s long days of sunshine and variety of outdoor settings quickly lured film companies to the West.

 

Silver-screen singing cowboy Tex Ritter was the father of actor Jon Ritter — known by millions for his role as bachelor Jack Tripper in the television series “Three’s Company.”

Tex Ritter appeared in numerous Western films, primarily in the mid-1930s and 1940s, and went on to achieve even greater fame as a Western recording artist.            

 

Trivia courtesy of Scottsdale's Museum of the West.       

Connor Pelton

Reporter , ASU Now

 
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Adidas, ASU announce partnership to shape the future of sport

Partnership combines ASU's world-class resources, Adidas' global reach.
Alliance will connect people to power of sport by translating complex research.
June 12, 2017

Global Sport Alliance will explore topics including diversity and race, sustainability and human potential through sport

Adidas and ASU today announced the Adidas and Arizona State University Global Sport Alliance, a strategic partnership aimed at shaping the future of sport and amplifying sport’s positive impact on society. Bringing together education, athletics, research and innovation, the Global Sport Alliance will explore topics including diversity, race, sustainability and human potential, all through the lens of sport.

 

Going beyond a traditional athletic partnership, the Global Sport Alliance will harness resources across the entire university and leverage Adidas’ global reach. This new, comprehensive partnership connects students, faculty, employees, researchers, engineers and a global network of thought leaders and partners to develop and exchange ideas, undertake joint inquiries and research, inspire people to act on key findings and transform ideas into reality in measurable ways.

“Few things in life bind people together more than passion for and participation in sport,” ASU President Michael Crow said. “Adidas and Arizona State University have come together because we have a common commitment to having a real-time, positive impact on the world and we see the power of sport to influence human success. We both seek to empower people, improve health and well-being, and inspire action through teaching, learning and community engagement. ASU, energetically focused on innovation and creative problem-solving, is a ready-made action lab to help extend Adidas’ ideas and creative energy.”

The partnership will explore topics including athlete potential, consumer behavior and insight, product materials and innovations, new educational opportunities and more. Investigating the role diversity and race plays in sport, the Global Sport Alliance provides a platform for exploration into fan behavior toward athletes, underrepresentation within coaching ranks and team ownership, bias issues related to officiating, and racial background and how it effects sport participation.

Sustainability is another key theme for the alliance, which aims to explore the entire lifecycle of sport — where it’s made, played and sold. The alliance will invite examination into topics such as sustainability education, traceability in product supply chain, the creation of sustainable materials and new recycling solutions.

“We’re ... exploring things like diversity, sustainability and human potential. Sport is so much bigger than the game. We believe through sport, we have the power to change lives.”
—  Adidas North America President Mark King

In addition, the alliance will investigate health in sports, looking at athletes holistically and exploring how to maximize human potential. One topic Adidas and ASU will consider exploring is tailored programs that encompass nutrition, mind-set, movement, recovery and product.

“Adidas and ASU see the world as a place to be disrupted,” said Adidas North America President Mark King. “When you combine the world-class resources of ASU with the global power of Adidas, extraordinary things can happen. We’re coming together to test the boundaries of the universe and make quantum leaps in what our future looks like. We’re looking at the world through the lens of sport and exploring things like diversity, sustainability and human potential. Sport is so much bigger than the game. We believe through sport, we have the power to change lives. Adidas and ASU have a shared passion for innovation and creativity, for leading change and finding what’s next. With the Global Sport Alliance, we’re on a quest to explore the unknown. We want the whole world to benefit from what we discover.”

A key component of the Global Sport Alliance is the Global Sport Institute (GSI), designed to connect people to the power of sport by translating and amplifying complex sports research to broad, global audiences. GSI will convene public events, engage leading sports figures and publish research findings through reports, infographics, podcasts and social media. Kenneth L. Shropshire, an international expert at the intersection of sports, business, law and society, will lead GSI as CEO and join ASU as the Distinguished Professor in Global Sports, a position created by Adidas.

“The Global Sport Institute will support collaborative inquiry and research that examines critical issues impacting sport and all those connected with sport,” Shropshire said. “GSI's purpose will be to transform the resulting findings into practical knowledge that is widely shared, educating and influencing audiences.”

The announcement of the alliance rapidly advances the connection between Adidas and ASU, two organizations that epitomize innovation and creativity. ASU was named the nation’s No. 1 most innovative university by U.S. News & World Report in 2015 and 2016, ahead of Stanford and MIT. Adidas highlights open-source innovation as a top strategic choice in its global business plan, working with partners around the world to increase creative capital, gain new perspectives and make new things. In 2014, the organizations announced a partnership for Adidas to be the official brand of Sun Devil Athletics.   

For more information about the Global Sport Alliance, visit adidas.asu.edu.

English professor’s Oxford fellowship broadens ASU role in health-humanities field


May 24, 2017

Arizona State University Professor of English Mark Lussier has been appointed Visiting Research Fellow in Medical Humanities at Worcester College, Oxford University, U.K.

Lussier will complete brief residencies at Oxford between August and December 2017, conducting research and helping forge connections between ASU and Oxford in the field of health humanities. Mark Lussier, chair and professor of English at ASU Mark Lussier, who has been appointed Visiting Research Fellow in Medical Humanities at Worcester College, Oxford University, has long worked on issues of integrated health. The ASU professor’s interest began with an administrative post in the trauma center of Houston’s Ben Taub County Hospital in the 1970s and has continued to the present through his investigations of Buddhist mindfulness and physiological responses to poetry. Download Full Image

Lussier, who is a former chair of the Department of English and a past president of the University Senate at ASU, researches the intersection between science and literature. The appointment brings together his academic work in the area over the past several years with his passion for helping others. Lussier explains that his presence at Oxford will pave the way for future student internship exchanges and research opportunities through Worcester College.

“The goal will be to create a multi-tiered, multi-dimensional program to help address the growing crisis in medical ‘care’ (versus medical ‘cure’) and its delivery,” Lussier said. “At a pragmatic level, we hope to articulate interventions to ameliorate suffering.”

Lussier has long worked on issues of integrated health. A Texas native, the ASU professor’s interest began with an administrative post in the trauma center of Houston’s Ben Taub County Hospital in the 1970s and has continued to the present through his investigations of Buddhist mindfulness and physiological responses to poetry.

Lussier and frequent collaborator Alison Essary of ASU’s College of Health Solutions have co-authored several articles on health humanities, including the 2014 white paper “The Necessity of Narrative: Linking Literature and Health Care in Higher Education Curricula” which was published in Forum on Public Policy. Their critical study endorses a new model of alternative medicine called “bibliotherapy” that, “if established properly, [can lead] to diagnostic and therapeutic breakthroughs.”

Lussier has also been instrumental in establishing the new College of Liberal Arts and Sciences undergraduate certificate in interdisciplinary health humanities, which will officially launch in the English department in fall 2018. The first related course in the field will be taught this fall by associate professor of English Cora Fox, who is interim director of the ASU Institute for Humanities Research. The class will be part of an innovative set of linked courses in the new ASU Humanities Lab focused on grand social challenges in health.

As for the immediate future: during summer 2017, Lussier will co-direct, with Essary, the Exploring Science and Medicine Through Art and Literature in Italy ASU Study Abroad program from May 29 to June 23, 2017. When the program wraps up, Lussier is then is off to Oxford, where he will direct and teach in the Medieval and Renaissance Studies in Oxford ASU program, July 7 to Aug. 11.

Kristen LaRue

communications specialist, Department of English

480-965-7611

ASU approves Open Access Policy


May 19, 2017

Public access to information is at the heart of a new policy at Arizona State University, the ASU Open Access Policy, which was passed by the University Senate and approved May 3 by University Provost Mark Searle.

The new policy, developed by the University Senate Open Access Task Force, aims to make it easier for ASU faculty and researchers to make their scholarly work more widely available and with fewer restrictions, and is in line with the university’s charter. students walking up steps from Hayden Library Download Full Image

Open access refers to peer-reviewed research that is made accessible to the public at no cost to the user — eliminating traditional copyright restrictions that many argue impede knowledge dissemination.

“ASU is committed to a fundamental principle of accessibility,” the motion statement reads. “This principle of accessibility includes open access to the knowledge generated and created by facul­ty members here at the university. Open Access to the scholarly works produced by ASU faculty members will allow individuals in Arizona, in the United States, and internationally to read journal articles freely and without the need for subscriptions or payment, thus disseminating this knowledge well beyond the typical audience.”

The need for open access

More than 70 universities in the United States, including Harvard, Duke and the University of California system, have adopted open access policies, part of a growing movement that is rapidly transforming the traditional model of scholarly publishing.

Many argue that making scientific data open and accessible carries major benefits for researchers and the public worldwide.

Just last year, ASU scientists were able to demonstrate how to quickly, cheaply and accurately diagnose the Zika virus in remote locations around the world through their research that was made available free online.

Open access articles are also read and cited at a higher rate than those published in traditional journals charging an access or subscription fee.

“One of the reasons we have open access policies is that it’s now a required condition of funding,” said Anali Perry, the scholarly communication librarian at ASU Library. “Many funding organizations — the NIH, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation — now mandate open access for research they are supporting. In other words, they want the results of the research they’re funding to be openly available to anyone in the world.”

Perry says open access makes sense for everyone, but particularly for ASU.

“With our focus on access, impact and social justice, this policy really reflects our ASU values and is one way of advancing our philanthropic goals and demonstrating return on investment,” Perry said. “The latest health research coming out of ASU could very well help a doctor in Cambodia, who might not be able to pay $50 per article to make a better medical decision for a patient.”

How the policy works

The open access policy at ASU is like no other — what Perry describes as a “hybrid policy.”

This means that while all ASU faculty and researchers are supported by the policy and encouraged to make their work openly accessible, they have the right to choose to comply with the policy if open access is not a condition of funding.

“If you are funded by an agency that has an open access requirement, like the NIH, you are automatically covered by this policy, meaning you immediately grant ASU permission to make the research publicly available in the appropriate repository, such as PubMed Central, as well as the ASU Digital Repository,” Perry said. “If you’re not required by a funding organization to make your work available, then you have the option to grant this open access license to ASU on a case-by-case basis.”

Perry said the new ASU policy gives faculty the right to archive, at the very least, the final accepted manuscript of their journal articles in the ASU Digital Repository, the online platform managed by ASU Library to archive and share the university’s scholarship.

“The University Senate is proud to support open access as part of ASU’s fundamental commitment to the discovery and application of new knowledge to local, regional, national and global concerns,” said Arnold Maltz, an associate professor in the W. P. Carey School of Business, who is the incoming University Senate president. “Our members look forward to taking advantage of this policy to continue to make a positive difference in communities throughout the world.”

Where to get help

ASU Library will be working with Knowledge Enterprise Development and the Office of the Provost to help streamline processes in an effort to make open access an easy and attractive option for ASU researchers.

“At the library, we can work with faculty to help them identify what publishers make complying with open access policies easy and painless, and help them understand their publication agreements and self-archiving rights and options,” Perry said. “We can help faculty archive their work and ensure compliance with both the ASU policy and their funding agency requirements.”

For questions about the new open access policy, view the Open Access Task Force’s FAQs, email Anali Perry and visit her scholarly communication library guide

Britt Lewis

Communications Specialist, ASU Library

 
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Top Arizona high school graduates head to ASU ready to make a difference

Top high school graduates commit to giving back and choose ASU to do it.
April 26, 2017

10 Flinn Scholars commit to being Sun Devils

Some of the most elite high school graduates in the state want to devote their careers to giving back, and they’ve decided the best place to begin that journey is at Arizona State University.

Daniel Nguyen, whose father came to the United States as a refugee, wants to be a military doctor, and Camryn Lizik, whose family has been affected by mental illness, will research the roots of the disease. These future Sun Devils are among this year’s Flinn Scholars, winning one of the most prestigious scholarships in Arizona.

Daniel Nguyen

“I’m definitely looking forward to the research. There’s a lot of great research being done at ASU, and I’ve already gotten to speak with many professors and researchers there. I would love to be involved with the new partnership with the Mayo Clinic,” said Nguyen, who is in the 32nd class of Flinn Scholars and one of 10 who will attend ASU.

The scholarship, which started in 1985 and is supported by the Flinn Foundation and the universities, is offered to outstanding Arizona high school students who attend either ASU, Northern Arizona University or the University of Arizona, which also has 10 future students in this Flinn class of 20.

Flinn Scholars are chosen based on merit. The scholarship covers the cost of tuition, room and board, and study abroad expenses and is valued at more than $115,000. The summer after their freshman year, the scholars travel together for a three-week seminar in China. The students also get support for off-campus internships and are paired with faculty mentors.

The Flinn Scholars coming to ASU will attend Barrett, The Honors College.

“It is always wonderful each year to hear that many Flinn Scholars will attend ASU and Barrett, The Honors College. We support, advise, guide and mentor them, and they add their extraordinary intellects and interests to our community,” said Mark Jacobs, vice provost and dean of Barrett. “It is a pleasure to see these top scholars from our state spread their academic wings and take flight at ASU and Barrett!”

Nguyen, who is graduating from Liberty High School in the Peoria Unified School District, will major in biological sciences and would like to be a military surgeon. His desire to give back was ingrained by his father, who came to the United States as a refugee from Vietnam after the war and eventually became a lieutenant colonel in the U.S. Army.

“He always tried to instill in me the attitude of service and giving back to the country that gave so much to us,” he said.

Like most Flinn Scholars, Nguyen is already quite accomplished, having earned certification as an emergency medical technician at Glendale Community College.

“I got to spend some time doing what EMTs do, which influenced my outlook on my career as well. The ability to work with patients on the provider level is amazing,” he said.

Camryn Lizik

Lizik’s decision to attend ASU was helped by the fact that she has already spent a lot of time on campus, with the HOBY youth-service program and the Cesar Chavez Leadership Institute.

“It’s always felt homey and familiar, and I feel it’s a place where I could make an impact as a student,” said Lizik, who attends Arcadia High School in Phoenix and wants to major in biological sciences.

“My family has a history of mental issues, and I struggle with OCD and it’s something that has a stigma that I would like to see erased,” she said.

“I have a very strong interest in the connection between social science and biological sciences. I’m interested in studying mental illness and how it affects people on a chemical level and how to correct that permanently.”

Ashley Dussault

Another Flinn Scholar and future Sun Devil, Ashley Dussault, also wants to use her major — sustainability — to help people.

“The program is about change, which is what I want to do. I want to plan cities to be better and to help with poverty,” said Dussault, who will graduate from Hamilton High School in the Chandler Unified School District.

She’s especially interested in the social-justice component of sustainability.

“I want to show the people of the world that just because sustainability is happening, they don’t have to be pushed out of their homes and that there’s a place for them in the world.”

Besides Nguyen, Lizik and Dussault, the other Flinn Scholars headed to ASU, along with their high schools and intended majors, are:

  • Daniel Bonner, Brophy Prep, Phoenix, electrical engineering
  • Jake Dean, Sunnyslope High School, Phoenix, earth and space exploration
  • Brittany Duran, Santa Cruz Valley Union High School, Eloy, biological sciences
  • Mark Macluskie, Cave Creek, home-schooled, mechanical engineering
  • Keaton McDonald, Arcadia High School, Phoenix, computer science
  • Shivam Sadachar, Basis Chandler, computer science
  • Cameron Whyte, Saguaro High School, Scottsdale, mathematics

Mary Beth Faller

reporter , ASU Now

480-727-4503

 
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ASU sustainability efforts are visible across Valley campuses.
ASU sustainability czar Mick Dalrymple calls for practice and engagement.
April 20, 2017

Dozens of student groups come together at university known for ongoing, wide-ranging sustainability efforts

Over the past academic year, Kendon Jung noticed something about the 77 sustainability-related student groups he oversaw at ASU: Though they shared common goals, they were working separately to achieve them instead of combining forces.

This week's Earth Festival on Hayden Lawn in Tempe was the first step toward fostering a coalition to change that. Sustainability student groups from multiple campuses came together to network, showcase their missions and achievements, and participate in a town hall conversation. 

Jung, a student activity adviser, said having a sustainability coalition at ASU will “organize students in a way that they can collaborate, brainstorm and put together projects that will be resilient, implementable” and that will “move the sustainability needle forward.”

It should be no surprise that so many ASU students are invested in the cause; the university was the first in the nation to offer a degree in sustainability in 2006 and has been at the forefront of the movement since, most recently earning a 2017 Best of Green Schools award from the Center for Green Schools at the U.S. Green Building Council, in collaboration with the Green Schools National Network. That honor was preceded by a top 10 spot in Sierra magazine’s 10th annual “Cool Schools” ranking of America’s greenest colleges and universities in September.

The reason behind that kind of recognition can be seen everywhere at ASU, from its LEEDLEED stands for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, and is one of the most popular green building certification programs used worldwide.-certified buildings, to its solar-panel-shaded parking lots, to its green-certified restaurants.

But sustainable physical operations alone aren’t enough, director of University Sustainability Practices Mick Dalrymple said. You’ve also go to implement principled practice and active engagement — in other words, you’ve also got to change people’s thoughts and behaviors.

“I call it walking the talk,” he said. “We’re trying to get people to rethink what sustainability looks like.”

What it looks like is giving employees the option to work from home, making alternative forms of transportation more accessible and changing the default copier setting to two-sided printing, among other things, he said.

“The bottom line is that the Earth is going to go on. Whether it goes on with us or without us is the question,” Dalrymple said. And if we want it to go on with us, “we have to realign our man-made systems with natural systems.”

Here are some of the ways ASU is doing that: 

Video by Ken Fagan/ASU Now

Energy conservation and production

The most visible manifestation of ASU’s sustainable energy efforts are its vast expanses of solar panels, spread out over parking lots and roofs, and its power parasols, giant collections of solar panels that tower over pedestrians on campus malls, providing shade and cooling the surrounding area while generating energy.

In January of this year, ASU partnered with a solar power plant in Red Rock, Arizona, increasing the university’s renewable-energy use by 150 percent and adding to the nearly 90 existing solar installations spread out across its campuses. Those installations produce more than 24 MWdcMWdc stands for megawatts in the form of direct current., one of the largest on-campus university solar-energy portfolios in the nation, and enough energy required to power 3,366 homes for one year. The new Red Rock partnership will push the university past a new milestone of 50 MWdc, more than double its current renewable-energy capacity. 

“It sends a message to our community, and in particular to our students, that this is what a sustainable campus can look like,” Gerald DaRosa, director of ASU Energy Innovations, said. “My hope is that they come to expect this as the norm, so that when our students progress through their lives and become parents, teachers, engineers and executives, they demand the same and more, eventually raising the bar even higher.”

Energy Innovations is only two years old at the university, but the department’s function is invaluable; mainly, it’s responsible for ensuring as much energy conservation and efficiency is being achieved as possible and also for identifying renewable-energy opportunities on- and off-campus.

Currently, they’re looking into how emerging battery technology has the potential to store energy generated by solar panels so it can still be used when the sun goes down. They’re hoping to install a battery system that will be used to power a small building within the next 12 months.

Within ASU’s many buildings are a number of existing features that help with energy reduction, such as motion-activated lights, something that has helped contribute to the university’s 47 certified-LEED projects. 

Zero Waste

ASU’s commitment to diverting waste from the landfill is seen all over its campuses and surrounding areas, in the form of the ubiquitous Blue Bins cozied up next to every trash can. The folks behind those efforts are members of the Zero Waste Department, an initiative that provides leadership development and hands-on experience in waste-diversion and aversion tactics.

Department assistant director Alana Levine said the difference is that diversion keeps waste out of landfills through recycling or repurposing while aversion keeps things that could become waste from proliferating in the first place. An example of aversion is the newly available reusable cup that provides free refills at all Tempe campus athletic events. Using the same cup instead of a new one every time you get a drink at a game reduces the number of paper cups that would otherwise be produced and then become waste.

Some of Zero Waste’s other initiatives include the Blue Bag recycling program, launched in 2015 to capture traditionally hard-to-recycle items, such as batteries and food wrappers; “green” sports games, where Zero Waste staff sort, weigh and calculate a diversion rate for the total waste produced; Recyclemania, a yearly, eight-week-long competition among colleges and universities throughout the U.S. and Canada; Ditch the Dumpster, a program that allows students who are moving out of dorms to donate, repurpose or recycle items they no longer need instead of throwing them away; and the No Wasted Paint Program, which collects and reuses old paint on campus.

The ASU Canon Strategic Alliance Partnership is helping reduce paper waste by better assessing individuals’ and departments’ printing needs. So far, it has reduced printing waste from 100 million pages a year to about 45 million.

ASU is also leading by example on the food production and consumption front. Many campus restaurants and shops offer locally sourced food, sometimes even from campus itself. Engrained, on the top floor of the Memorial Union, recently received a Green Restaurant Certification for such sustainable practices, and every year, various campuses host fruit harvests. There are also a number of gardening and composting efforts.

Water waste is also on the university’s radar, with a goal of cutting water use in half and eliminating all wastewater by 2020. Proposals have been made for a water reclamation facility on campus that would allow ASU to treat its own wastewater and reuse it. The university is also looking to retrofit fixtures in older buildings with antiquated bathrooms and to begin metering buildings to measure how much water is actually being used. Even landscaping is considered, with ideas for weather-sensitive sprinkling systems that can tell when it rains.

Everywhere you look at ASU, there are ways to help reduce your environmental footprint, Levine said. It’s just a matter of getting started.

“Don’t get overwhelmed by all the options,” she said. “Start with your initial actions that are doable, and then build on that,” such as carrying a reusable mug, or bringing your lunch in Tupperware instead of one-time-use bags. “You don’t have to change your entire life right away. There’s always a starting point and then a next step to take.” 

Carbon neutrality

ASU has set a goal of carbon neutrality for its buildings — several of which are already LEED-certified — by 2025, and for buildings and transportation combined by 2035. During fiscal year 2016, renewable-energy use at ASU avoided approximately 21,700 metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent, roughly equal to the annual emissions of 4,500 passenger vehicles.

Also aiding in the cause are the number of alternative transportation options offered by the university, such as intercampus shuttles; bike lanes and valets; and employee and student Valley Metro light rail unlimited-ride passes. Online courses and employee telecommunication options also help cut down on transportation emissions.

“People don’t realize the incredible impact transportation has had,” Dalrymple said. “We’ve made significant strides in that area.”

And ASU is doing the same in construction, he added. The campus’ newest building, the in-progress Student Pavilion on the Tempe campus, will be the university’s first net zero-energy building, meaning it will use no more energy than can be produced on site annually.

Walking the talk

Dalrymple said it’s a goal of University Sustainability Initiatives “to implement sustainability into every function of the university.”

From student groups, to construction practices, to waste diversion, to energy production, to sustainable dining, that goal is already a reality. What all those things do, combined, Dalrymple said, is help to change people’s overall mind-set about sustainability in general.

“When I started working in this field in 2001, we were talking about (environmental effects on our) grandchildren,” Dalrymple said. “But we’re seeing impacts now. It’s not just going to impact our grandchildren, it’s going to impact us in our lifetimes … and we need to make the right choices now.

“The future will be determined by what we do now.”

In celebration of Earth Month and in anticipation of Earth Day on Saturday, a number of events have been taking place all over ASU. Aside from the student group Earth Festival on Hayden Lawn in Tempe, there was a screening of the climate-change documentary “Before the Flood” at the West campus, a farmers’ market at the Polytechnic campus and a gardening and cooking workshop at the Downtown Phoenix campus.

For a full list of Earth Month events at ASU, click here

 

Top photo: Julie Ann Wrigley Global Institute of Sustainability staffer Trinity Dosemagen (left) and senior sustainability major Dania LaScola try their hand at the Future Builder game during the Student Sustainability Club Earth Day Festival on Hayden Lawn on April 19. The game assigns colors to money, resources and people and asks you to build a Jenga tower and borrow from it to play the game. Photo by Deanna Dent/ASU Now

ASU surges in tech transfer rankings


April 20, 2017

Arizona State University has surged in technology transfer rankings in a new Milken Institute report released today. In the newly released report, ASU ranks 21st. In the institute’s 2006 report, ASU ranked 43rd.

“Arizona State’s improvement since 2006, in a period of just over a decade, is tremendous,” said Ross DeVol, chief research officer at the Milken Institute. “When you look at the universities ASU ranked ahead of, Harvard, Johns Hopkins, Duke, you can go down the list, these are premier research universities and ASU has moved ahead of them. ASU has a top notch research apparatus in place, especially with President Michael Crow’s emphasis on research that doesn’t just advance scientific knowledge but also is relevant to the marketplace.” Download Full Image

The Milken report, “Concept to Commercialization: The Best Universities for Technology Transfer,” ranks more than 200 U.S. research institutions. The methodology controlled for research expenditures and focused on four key indicators of technology transfer success: patents issued, licenses issued, licensing income, and startups formed.

“The Milken Institute ranking recognizes ASU’s commitment to sharing the knowledge we create with the innovation marketplace to better serve our communities,” said Sethuraman Panchanathan, executive vice president of Knowledge Enterprise Development and chief research and innovation officer at ASU. “We’re not only advancing regional competitiveness through research and discovery, but also ensuring that our work has direct impact on lives every day.”

Arizona Technology Enterprises (AzTE) is the exclusive technology transfer organization for ASU. AzTE works with faculty, investors and industry partners to translate ASU innovation into broad societal impact. Since 2003, AzTE has launched more than 100 startups, which have generated more than $650 million in investment capital, and has received more than 2,700 invention disclosures.

Augie Cheng, AzTE’s CEO, was recruited by ASU in August 2007 to lead AzTE’s transformation into a faculty service and impact-driven organization.

“We have been quite fortunate to be able to work with world-class researchers at ASU focused on use-inspired research activities. Our team partners with industry and investors to execute rapid and efficient deals that aren’t bogged down by the typical institutional constraints,” Cheng said. “This emphasis on speed to market, universal marketing, and post-deal support for our technologies and startups has helped ASU inventors achieve real-world use of their intellectual products.”

More information can be found online at http://www.azte.com/.

ASU joins Oak Ridge Associated Universities


April 19, 2017

Arizona State University has become a member of the Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), a consortium of more than 100 major PhD-granting institutions focused on collaborative partnerships that enhance the scientific research and education in the U.S.

ASU is the first university in Arizona to join the consortium, which is affiliated with Oak Ridge National Laboratories Explore sign Download Full Image

Sethuraman Panchanathan, executive vice president of Knowledge Enterprise Development and chief research and innovation officer at ASU, will serve as ASU’s councilor to ORAU throughout the partnership.

“ASU places great emphasis on research and education being accessible to empower the region and nation’s economic competitiveness,” Panchanathan said. “Our participation in the ORAU consortium will enable us to collaborate with similar-minded higher education institutions to respond to grand challenges related to sustainability and global security.”

ORAU provides innovative scientific and technical solutions to advance national priorities in science, education, security and health. Through specialized teams of experts, unique laboratory capabilities and access to a consortium of more than 100 major PhD-granting institutions, ORAU works with federal, state, local and commercial customers to advance national priorities and serve the public interest.

Learn more about ORAU at http://www.orau.org.

For Preservation Week, meet an ASU conservator

Tours will be given of Hayden Library's conservation lab April 24-25


April 19, 2017

Do you have an old book, vintage letter or a 1980s Star Wars movie poster at home that you want to properly preserve?

ASU conservator Suzy Morgan carries out this work every day in the ASU Library conservation lab, where she performs in-house treatments and repairs for the library’s circulating collections and many special collections, including the Star Wars collection and the Chicano/a Research Collection. ASU Conservator Suzy Morgan ASU conservator Suzy Morgan will lead tours of the conservation lab at ASU Library, April 24-25, as part of Preservation Week. Download Full Image

Morgan will be leading tours of the conservation lab, April 24-25, as part of Preservation Week – a global celebration of a key library function. 

For many who take the tour, it will be an introduction into the work of preserving knowledge, both artifactual and textual.

“A conservator has to have a good grasp of not just art, but also science, history and a high level of manual dexterity,” Morgan said. “The best and most challenging part of my work is the problem-solving skills that are required. Each item that comes into the lab has its own unique combination of preservation issues. There is no ‘one size fits all’ approach — each item gets a customized treatment from me and my staff.”

It’s estimated that some 630 million items in collecting institutions such as libraries require immediate attention and care; therefore, the goal of Preservation Week is to raise awareness about the urgency of preservation, why it’s needed and what you can do, individually and as a community, to preserve both shared and personal collections.

During Preservation Week, Morgan will demonstrate how she and her highly trained staff work to repair, revive and bolster vulnerable materials, such as old books, documents and artifacts — ensuring their sustainability for generations to come.

“Our goal is to return the repaired material to our patrons and to specialized library collections as quickly as possible, using the highest quality materials and techniques possible,” Morgan writes.

ASU Library’s Preservation Department was founded in 1987 under the direction of Sharlane Grant, and is located on the first floor of Hayden Library. For more information on preservation services at ASU Library, visit https://lib.asu.edu/preservation.

Group tours of the ASU Library conservation lab will be approximately 45 minutes in length and are scheduled for 1 p.m. Monday, April 24, and 10 a.m. Tuesday, April 25.

Sign up here for the tour of the ASU Library conservation lab during Preservation Week. RSVP is required.

Britt Lewis

Communications Specialist, ASU Library

 
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3 new appointments enhance ASU efforts to serve students, community

April 19, 2017

University leaders take on new roles, responsibilities in cultural, communications and Campaign ASU 2020

Arizona State University is rewriting what it means to be a university with a mission to serve its students and beyond, from new ways to open access to higher education, to innovative ways to make a college stalwart — the football stadium — into a community gathering place year-round.

To further support strategic goals such as these, three leaders in the ASU community will take on new and expanded roles.

Christine Wilkinson, Colleen Jennings-Roggensack and Katie Paquet will each assume new responsibilities, effective immediately.

Wilkinson, ASU’s senior vice president, secretary of the university and president of the ASU Alumni Association, will be playing a pivotal role in spearheading fundraising efforts around two of the key components of the Campaign ASU 2020 objectives: ensuring student access and excellence, and championing student success. Campaign ASU 2020 is a university-wide philanthropic effort with a goal to raise at least $1.5 billion for the enterprise over the next three years. Wilkinson will also take charge of the new Office of University Ceremonies and Events, overseeing, among other things, the preparation, protocol and execution of major gatherings like commencement.

Wilkinson has served the university in a multitude of roles for 47 years, including as the vice president of Student Affairs and as the interim athletic director. She holds a tenured faculty position in the Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College and was recently inducted into the Arizona Women’s Hall of Fame.

Jennings-Roggensack has been named vice president for cultural affairs at ASU and will remain the executive director of ASU Gammage, the premiere performing arts venue in Arizona. In her role, Jennings-Roggensack will lead Sun Devil Stadium 365, a university-wide initiative to reimagine and redesign the use of Sun Devil Stadium as a community union used 365 days a year by faculty, staff, students and the entire Arizona community for events and activities beyond athletics. She will also continue her work connecting ASU and the community through the arts.

Jennings-Roggensack was nominated by President Bill Clinton to serve on the National Council on the Arts, which she did from 1994 to 1997. She served as an ambassador for the arts for the National Council on the Arts until 2004. She has held positions at Dartmouth College and Colorado State University and chairs the Broadway League's Diversity and Inclusion Committee. She is also Arizona’s only Tony voter.

Katie Paquet, currently the deputy chief of staff in the Office of the President at ASU, has been named the vice president for media relations and strategic communications, overseeing the creation of print, photo and video stories about the university and engaging with media outlets to proactively communicate the success and work of our students, faculty and staff.

Prior to joining ASU, Paquet was the vice president of public affairs and external relations for the Arizona Board of Regents. She oversaw all communications and government relations activities for the board, serving as a liaison with media, policymakers, and the business, civic and educational community. 

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