Trent Bray hired as ASU linebackers coach


March 2, 2010

Former Arizona State University graduate assistant Trent Bray has been named Linebackers Coach for the Sun Devil football team, Head Coach Dennis">http://thesundevils.cstv.com/sports/m-footbl/mtt/erickson_dennis00.html"... Erickson announced Tuesday. Defensive Coordinator Craig">http://thesundevils.cstv.com/sports/m-footbl/mtt/bray_craig00.html">Craig Bray, whose defense ranked No. 1 in the Pacific-10 Conference last year in total defense (297.6), rush defense (108.6), pass defense (189.0), opponent first downs (15.8) and opponent third-down conversions (29.7), will coach the safeties, with assistance from cornerbacks coach Greg">http://thesundevils.cstv.com/sports/m-footbl/mtt/burns_greg00.html">Greg Burns. The Sun Devil defense appeared in three Top 20 categories nationally, including 13th in total defense, 19th in rushing defense and 20th in pass efficiency defense.

Bray will assume the full-time role of coaching the ASU linebackers, a task he is no stranger to as he served as graduate assistant for the linebackers/defense in 2007 and 2008. Download Full Image

Bray enjoyed a stellar playing career at Oregon State University. A member of Dennis">http://thesundevils.cstv.com/sports/m-footbl/mtt/erickson_dennis00.html"... Erickson's 2001 signing class, Bray was a standout linebacker for the Beavers from 2002-2005, staring 34 of 49 career games.

As a junior in 2004, he collected 122 tackles and was named Second-Team All-Pacific-10 Conference. He also earned Insight Bowl Defensive MVP honors by making an Oregon State-bowl record 10 tackles in a victory over Notre Dame.

He was selected co-captain of the Beaver football team as a senior, and he backed it up with another terrific season, recording 116 tackles and earning First-Team all-Pac-10 honors.

Bray finished his collegiate career with 337 tackles, the sixth-highest total in Oregon State history, 29.0 tackles for loss and 10.5 quarterback sacks while making 33 consecutive starts over his final three seasons in Corvallis. He then moved on to the National Football League, where he spent time with the Miami Dolphins and the Houston Texans.

Bray rejoins the Sun Devil football family after spending the past year as an assistant coach (linebackers/quality control) for the California Redwoods of the United Football League.

Vélez-Ibáñez honored by Hispanic higher ed association


March 2, 2010

Arizona State University professor Carlos Vélez-Ibáñez will be honored by the American Association of Hispanics in Higher Education (AAHHE) with its Outstanding Support of Hispanic Issues in Higher Education Award.

Vélez-Ibáñez, an anthropologist and chair of the Department of Transborder Chicana/o and Latina/o Studies in ASU’s College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, conducts transnational field research in two rural valleys in California and New Mexico and their sending communities in Mexico. His area of study focuses on applied anthropology, complex social organizations, culture and education, ethno-class relations in complex social systems, migration and adaptation of human populations, political ecology, qualitative methodology and urban anthropology. Download Full Image

The publications of Vélez-Ibáñez are numerous and include the 1996 book “Border Visions: Mexican Cultures of the Southwest United States.”

Vélez-Ibáñez, who came to ASU in 2005, most recently spearheaded the research effort for “The State of Latino Arizona,” a major study of Latino issues in Arizona that sheds light on the past and present. The study was completed by the Arizona Latino Research Enterprise and Arizona State University.

According to AAHHE President Loui Olivas, an assistant vice president at ASU, Vélez-Ibáñez was selected for the award by a panel of experts in higher education. The selection criteria focused on the recipient’s sustained contributions and efforts to showcase the significant accomplishments this award represents.

Each year, this award is given to an individual in the community who has demonstrated outstanding accomplishment and support of Hispanic issues.

“I am most gratified by this high honor for the modest contributions of which I have been a part,” said Vélez-Ibáñez. “These were the result of the work of many and to them and to future generations I dedicate this award.”

To celebrate and recognize the work of Hispanics in higher education and other national leaders, the AAHHE awards program was created to honor individuals at a special awards luncheon, this year on March 6 at the national conference in Costa Mesa, Calif.

“AAHHE is an agent of change for improving education, thus enabling Hispanic students to fully participate in a diverse society,” Olivas said. It works collaboratively with education, business and industry sectors, as well as community and professional organizations to enhance the educational aspirations and to meet the professional growth needs of a significantly increasing Hispanic population.

More information is online at http://www.aahhe.org.">http://www.aahhe.org/">http://www.aahhe.org.