Green and healthy: ASU Health Service Building awarded LEED platinum


February 11, 2014

The Health Service Building on Arizona State University's Tempe campus has earned a LEED platinum certification from the U.S. Green Building Council.

Health Service is the second ASU building to receive a platinum certification, which is the highest USGBC green building ranking under its LEED (Leadership in Excellence in Environmental Design) program. The Health Services Building is also the 38th ASU building to be LEED certified. exterior view of ASU Health Service building Download Full Image

The Health Service Building underwent a major renovation and expansion that was completed in March 2012 by ASU's Facilities Development and Management unit.

“This dynamic project has enabled ASU both to provide an inviting health care environment for our students, and to embrace sustainable design and technologies,” said Bruce Jensen, interim associate vice president, Facilities Development and Management.

The building now features solar energy panels, recycled materials, and sustainable design and construction in both interior spaces and exterior landscaping. The Health Services Building earned points under seven sustainability categories that judged the building design.

"LEED criteria look at how well the building conserves energy, the building’s water efficiency, what kinds of construction materials were used and whether the building site enhances sustainability and indoor environmental quality, to name a few,” said Ken Taylor, the ASU project manager who managed construction.

Building waste was sorted carefully and diverted from landfills. Concrete from the old courtyard was sawn into blocks and repurposed into the landscaping. Bricks and recyclable materials from the building demolition were salvaged and used in other areas.

“I was thrilled to learn of the platinum rating for the building," said Dr. Allan Markus, director of ASU Health Services. “It’s the result of a team effort that reflects ASU’s collaborative culture and leadership on issues of clean energy and environmental sustainability.”

The project transformed the aging Health Service Building into a modern facility more suitable for use by the more than 60,000 students enrolled at the ASU Tempe campus. Structure space was added to the building for the first time since 1968, when Tempe campus student enrollment topped 23,000.

Okland Construction was the construction manager on the project, and design firms Lake Flato and Orcutt-Winslow were the architects. The project was financed through support of an ASU student health fee.

Eric Jensen, eric.jensen@asu.edu
ASU Facilities Development and Management

Wendy Craft

Marketing and communications manager, Business and Finance Communications Group

480-965-6695

'MUCK' exhibit showcases new trends in ceramic art


February 11, 2014

6:30-8:30 p.m., Feb. 14
ASU Art Museum season opening reception

“MUCK: Accumulations, Accretions and Aggregations,” featuring the art of seven contemporary ceramic sculpture artists, opens at the ASU Art Museum Feb. 15. Matt Wedel Download Full Image

The exhibition, curated by Peter Held, will feature more than 20 works of art from both previous and new bodies of work by Susan Beiner, Nathan Craven, Michael Fujita, David Hicks, Annabeth Rosen, Meghan Smythe and Matt Wedel.

On view in the Top Gallery at the ASU Art Museum’s 10th Street and Mill Avenue location through May 31, MUCK will showcase sculpture that pushes the boundaries of both technical virtuosity and arresting visual imagery.

Each artist in the exhibition creates work that deals with incorporating a diversity of objects to create a cohesive whole, says Held. The artists in MUCK combine potent elements of labor, scale, material and the innate sensuality of clay and glaze to address concerns of environmental peril and searching for a humanistic balance in a seemingly all-consuming technological culture.

“United by their visually stunning work, the artists presented in MUCK invoke pure joy in the medium, creating order from chaos while confronting issues of personal growth and transformation,” Held explains. “Whether using repetitive shapes to create patterns or assembling a multiplicity of objects metaphorically, their work reflects upon the natural world and human condition, and our place within it.”

An opening reception for the exhibition will take place from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m, Feb. 14 (with a members, alumni and press preview from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m.). In addition, curator Peter Held will give a gallery tour of the exhibition and lecture at 6:30 p.m., April 8. Both events are free and open to the public.

MUCK: Accumulations, Accretions and Aggregations is generously supported by the Helme Prinzen Endowment, Joan and David Lincoln and members of Ceramic Leaders at ASU, and organized by the ASU Art Museum, part of the Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts at Arizona State University.

Juno Schaser

Event coordinator, Biodesign Institute

480-965-0014