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Explore Earth, space with ASU scientists Nov. 2


October 30, 2013

School of Earth and Space Exploration invites public to day of hands-on science fun

The public is invited to spend a day exploring Earth and space with ASU scientists from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Nov. 2, at the Interdisciplinary Science and Technology Building IV (ISTB 4), at Arizona State University’s Tempe campus. The day-long event is designed to inspire the many local kids, parents, educators and other community members that are intrigued by science. ESE Day 2012 exploding trash can Download Full Image

Earth and Space Exploration Day provides a variety of science-related interactive activities for children age five and up, and anyone interested in exploring Earth and space alongside real scientists.

For more than 15 years faculty and students in the School of Earth and Space Exploration in ASU’s College of Liberal Arts and Sciences have sponsored the event and used it as a means of connecting the community with science.

Together, families can experience a variety of activities, including digging for meteorites and creating impact craters, manipulating robotic arms and driving remote-controlled underwater robots, and learning the science of rockets by making a soda straw rocket, to name a few. For a complete listing of activities, visit: http://sese.asu.edu/earth-and-space-exploration-day.

In addition to the tabletop activities and interactive demonstrations, there will be lab tours, lectures and opportunities to engage with the kiosk-style exhibits in the Gallery of Scientific Exploration.

Space lovers can look through telescopes at solar spots and visit a replica of Curiosity Rover, matching the dimensions of the real rover currently on Mars. Several 3-D astronomy shows will be offered at various times in the building’s state-of-the-art, high-definition Marston Exploration Theater. 

Meteorite enthusiasts can visit the meteorite display on the second floor, drawn from the extensive collection of ASU’s Center for Meteorite Studies. Visitors can examine touchable samples, engage with interactive displays and ask staff to inspect potential meteorite specimens.

Rock hounds can bring a rock specimen for ‘Dr. Rock’ to analyze and identify, or take part in a family-friendly geology field trip to “A” Mountain (Hayden Butte) to learn about the sedimentary rocks, volcanic rocks and geological structures exposed in Tempe. The ASU GeoClub will also be selling mineral and rock samples, along with snacks.

Lectures are scheduled throughout the day on topics ranging from space exploration to Earth’s climate.

Attendees are encouraged to pre-register: https://nasa.asu.edu/ESE-Day-Registration?destination=ESE-Day-Registration.

For more information, contact the School of Earth and Space Exploration at (480) 965-5081 or visit http://sese.asu.edu/earth-and-space-exploration-day

Nikki Cassis

marketing and communications director, School of Earth and Space Exploration

New health studies launched with ASU, Mayo seed grants


October 30, 2013

Researchers from Arizona State University and Mayo Clinic are teaming up to study critical health problems with support from seed grants funded jointly by ASU and Mayo Clinic. These new projects will contribute to advances in:

• identifying antibodies involved in inflammatory bowel disease Download Full Image

• improving nutrition and physical activity among homeless children

• developing better prosthetic hands

• enhancing the quality of colonoscopies

• understanding biological processes involved in addiction and eating disorders

“The seed grant program is one of many ways ASU and Mayo Clinic work together to improve human health and advance the science of health care delivery. This program provides the opportunity to launch innovative research efforts with the potential for significant impact on society,” says Sethuraman “Panch” Panchanathan, senior vice president for Knowledge Enterprise Development at ASU.

Over the past decade, ASU and Mayo Clinic have partnered on several joint research projects, research centers, academic programs, joint faculty appointments, dual degrees and provision of health services.

The seed grant program began in 2005 and provides $40,000 to each winning team to initiate studies that advance biomedicine and health. The goal of the program is to develop preliminary results that can help attract substantial funding from external agencies. Since its inception, the program has funded 54 projects.

"The Seed Grant program is a cornerstone of the Mayo Clinic-ASU relationship that continues to create new and lasting partnerships between scientists and physicians from each institution,” says Dr. Dean Wingerchuk, vice chair for clinical research at Mayo Clinic in Arizona. “It provides a direct mechanism for advancing new technologies and health care innovations with a goal of improving health care delivery and outcomes."

The winning proposals are judged on five criteria. They must be scientifically interesting and innovative, have valid methodology, show collaborative effort, offer the likelihood of future funding or collaboration, and be feasible to complete within the project period. ASU faculty members on the winning teams represent a variety of disciplines, including engineering, nursing, chemistry, biomedical informatics and psychology.

The 2014 projects include:

“Autoantibody biomarker discovery in inflammatory bowel disease using Immunoproteomics.”
Joshua LaBaer, professor, ASU Biodesign Institute; Dr. Shabana Pasha, specialist in gasteroenterology/inflammatory bowel disease, Mayo Clinic.

“Pilot nutritional and physical activity data in homeless children.”
Diana Jacobson, assistant professor, ASU College of Nursing and Health Solutions; Dr. Brian Lynch, assistant professor of pediatrics, Mayo Clinic.

“Design and implementation of a soft synergy-based hand for prosthetic applications.”
Marco Santello, professor, ASU School of Biological and Health Systems Engineering; Dr. Carmen Terzic, chair of physical medicine and rehabilitation, Mayo Clinic.

“Enhancing the quality of optical colonoscopy.”
Jianming Liang, associate professor, ASU Department of Biomedical Informatics; Dr. Suryakanth Gurudu, associate professor of medicine, Mayo Clinic.

“Chromatin alterations produced by drugs of abuse and binge eating.”
Foster Olive, associate professor, ASU Department of Psychology; Traci Czyzyk-Morgan, assistant professor of physiology, Mayo Clinic.

Learn more about past seed grant recipients.

Learn more about collaborations between ASU and Mayo Clinic.