ASU News

ASU-Mayo seed grants support new health studies

November 30, 2012

Arizona State University and Mayo Clinic have announced the recipients of the 2013 ASU Mayo Seed Grant Program, which provides funding for collaborative research projects between the two institutions. The winning research teams will study health issues that include obesity, brain tumors, heart disease, breast cancer, and a rare but debilitating upper respiratory condition.

The seed grant program began in 2005 and has funded 49 projects, including this year’s five recipients. Each of the research teams will receive $40,000 to initiate studies that will improve human health. The goal of the program is to move projects far enough along that they can attract more substantial funding from outside agencies in the future. Download Full Image

“This is a unique collaboration between basic researchers, clinical researchers and clinicians at Mayo Clinic and ASU, which helps accelerate basic discoveries to practice,” said Sethuraman “Panch” Panchanathan, senior vice president for Knowledge Enterprise Development at ASU. “The partnership has already resulted in a number of successful projects funded by external agencies that engage students, faculty researchers and clinicians. We are very excited to embark on our next round of studies.”

The winning proposals are judged on five criteria. They must be scientifically interesting and innovative, have valid methodology, show collaborative effort, offer the likelihood of future funding or collaboration, and be feasible to complete within the project period.

"The ASU-Mayo seed grant awards have deepened and broadened our already substantive links in research. This year was our most competitive to date and the awards are a testament to the advantages of bringing together ASU and Mayo faculty to tackle significant health related issues,” said Keith Stewart, dean for research at Mayo Clinic Arizona.

The 2013 studies and their primary investigators are:

• “Effects of Single- and Dual-Disc Mechanical Mitral Valves and their Rotational Orientation on Patient-Specific Cardiac Flow Dynamic and Thrombogenic Conditions.” Ronald Adrian, School for Engineering of Matter, Transport and Energy, Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering; Hari Chaliki, Mayo Clinic.

• “Defining the Role of Androgen Receptor in Endocrine-Resistant Breast Cancer.” Joshua LaBaer, M.D., Biodesign Institute at ASU; Barbara Pockaj, M.D., Mayo Clinic.

• “Study of Epigenetic Influences on Obese Adults Following Bariatric Surgery.” Dawn Coletta, School of Life Sciences, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences; Lori Roust, M.D., Mayo Clinic in Arizona; James Madura II, M.D., Mayo Clinic in Arizona.

• “Idiopathic Subglottic Stenosis Tissue and Deep Sequencing Study.” Valentin Dinu, Department of Biomedical Informatics; David Lott, M.D., Mayo Clinic.

• “Affinity Maturation of an Antibody Based Therapeutic Targeting Microglial Activation.” Michael Sierks, School for Engineering of Matter, Transport and Energy, Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering; Joseph Loftus, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine.

To learn more about collaborations between ASU and Mayo Clinic, visit our partnership site at:

To learn about past seed grant recipients, visit:

Media contact:
Amelia Huggins,
Office of Knowledge Enterprise Development

ASU News

Article spotlights shortage of males in nursing

November 30, 2012

It was men who attended the world’s first nursing school in India in 250 B.C., yet today, the percentage of practicing male nurses in the United States hovers at a mere six to seven percent. How can that be?

“Men in Nursing” is the featured article in the Fall issue of Innovations in Nursing & Health magazine, published by ASU’s College of Nursing and Health Innovation. The article discusses the gender disparity in the nursing field, why stereotypes endure and what can be done to encourage more men to join the profession to correct the imbalance. "Men in Nursing" is the featured article in the December issue of "Innovations in Nursing & Health" magazine, published by ASU's College of Nursing and Health Innovation. Photo by: ASU College of Nursing and Health Innovation Download Full Image

The reasons for the imbalance stems from the simple fact that nursing is traditionally perceived as a “woman’s job.” The nursing profession needs to place greater emphasis on recruiting men for a variety of reasons, particularly the projected shortage of 260,000 nurses in the United States by 2025.

Teri Pipe, dean of the College of Nursing and Health Innovation says, “At ASU we are always looking for more ways to provide an inclusive learning environment. We look for ways to provide positive role models. We need to do a better job of getting the word out about all of the roles in nursing, the variety of things people can do and the flexibility that comes with a nursing degree.”

Pipe said opportunities abound in everything from informatics to working in communities critical-care units and emergency departments, and performing research, as well as administrative roles.

For Joshua Stark, 27, who is in his final year at ASU’s College of Nursing and Health Innovation, it’s a way to connect with his fellow man. Stark recently completed an OB/GYN rotation and said the new dads were appreciative of having a male nurse on-hand during labor and delivery. “The dads loved having a male nurse because they weren’t the odd man out,” Stark said. “Nursing is a field for intelligent, passionate people who truly care about others. None of those qualities are specific to either gender.”

The article suggests that nursing’s academic leaders should partner with schools and community-based organizations to reach potential students, offering loans and grants that target students in accelerated-degree nursing programs where the students are more likely to be male. The American Assembly for Men in Nursing recently introduced the Future of Nursing Campaign for Action, pushing for an increase in the percentage of male nursing students from its current 12 percent to 20 percent by 2020.

To obtain a copy of the Fall issue of Innovations in Nursing and Health magazine, visit


Reporter , ASU Now