Associate professor earns Outstanding Alumnus Award


May 18, 2009

Dr. Nancy Rodriguez has been awarded the 2009 Outstanding Alumnus Award by the College of Criminal Justice at Sam Houston State University in Texas.

She is an Associate Professor in the ASU School of Criminology and Criminal Justice, part of the College of Public Programs. Download Full Image

Her research interests include sentencing policies, juvenile court processes, and substance abuse. She also conducts research in the area of restorative justice.

Rodriguez's research has included program evaluations of drug courts, restorative justice programs, and three strikes laws. She received several grants from the Bureau of Justice Statistics, the National Institute of Justice, and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

"Dr. Rodriguez has a rare combination of scholarly, professional and personal acumen. I know her to be an outstanding researcher and a good human being," said Dr. Todd Armstrong, Associate Professor of Criminal Justice at Sam Houston State University. "We here in the College of Criminal Justice can be very proud of the manner in which Dr. Rodriguez represents us to both the field of criminology and criminal justice, and to the larger community."

Rodriguez is co-author of "Just Cause or Just Because? Prosecution and Plea-bargaining Resulting in Prison Sentences on Low-level Drug Charges in California and Arizona," and co-editor of "Images of Crime: Readings."

Her recent work appeared in Crime Delinquency, Justice Quarterly, and Criminology Public Policy.

Rodriguez received her Bachelor of Science in law enforcement and police science from Sam Houston State University in 1992, and began her graduate studies. She completed her Ph.D. in political science from Washington State University in 1998.

For information about the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice, visit http://ccj.asu.edu">http://ccj.asu.edu/">http://ccj.asu.edu.

ASU Lodestar Center to honor nonprofit graduates


May 5, 2009

Students receiving professional certificates and academic degrees in nonprofit studies will be recognized for their achievements on May 6 at a reception hosted by the ASU Lodestar Center.  The event, held on the second floor of the Walter Cronkite building at the ASU Downtown Campus, will begin with a Master of Nonprofit Studies (MNpS) graduate poster session and reception at 5 p.m., followed by the presentation of certificates.  The invited speakers are Dr. Debra Friedman, University Vice President and Dean, ASU College of Public Programs, and Pam Gaber, the President and founder of Gabriel’s Angels.

Students being recognized have earned a graduate certificate in Nonprofit Leadership and Management, a Master’s degree in Nonprofit Studies, or a Nonprofit Management Institute (NMI) professional development certificate. Download Full Image

“ASU offers the widest array of educational offerings for leading and managing nonprofit organizations of any university in the nation,” said Dr. Robert F. Ashcraft, director of the ASU Lodestar Center for Philanthropy and Nonprofit Innovation and professor of nonprofit studies in the School of Community Resources and Development. “It is with great pride that we celebrate the achievements of our talented students. The graduates who have earned our academic degrees and our professional development education certificate validates that nonprofit professionals wish to lead and manage their organizations with the best available knowledge and tools a provided by our outstanding professors and practitioner experts.”

Students who will receive a graduate certificate: Sharon Abramson, Saso Andonoski, DuWayne Eilers, Leigh Hersey, and Samuel Holdren. 

Students who will receive a Master of Nonprofit Studies degree: Nicole Almond Tucker, Ruby Alvarado Hernandez, Kara Anderson, Megan Birkey, Jill Christiansen, Katherine Coleman-Burns, Genevieve Croker, Athelyn Daniel, Corina Frolander, Rachael Goldberg, Tanisha Gordon, Brittany James, Krishna Kelley, Christopher Korte, Damon Lemmons, Cassandra Mazur, Elizabeth Mikkelsen, James Potts, Susan Rossi, Shawn Rudnick, Susie Sands, Andrea Sok, Amy Steinman, Aaron Stiner, Amber Stubbs, Chela Sullivan, Brooke Todare, and Bella Williamson. 

NMI professional development certificates will be awarded to: Karen Bever, Ann-Mary Johnson-Lutzick, Carla Landwerth, Teresa Moore, Philip Reller, Julie Schaffer, Charla Triplett, Cathy Tullgren, and Sarah Whitmore.

The ASU Lodestar Center for Philanthropy and Nonprofit Innovation (formerly the ASU Center for Nonprofit Leadership and Management), is recognized as a national leader in undergraduate and graduate nonprofit education, research and technical assistance. The ASU Lodestar Center exists to enhance the quality of life in communities through the advancement of nonprofit leadership practices and provides knowledge and tools to build the capacity of nonprofit organizations, professionals, board members, donors and volunteers by offering a selection of capacity building workshops, conferences, classes, and programs. For more information, visit: http://nonprofit.asu.edu/" target="_blank" title="http://nonprofit.asu.edu.">http://nonprofit.asu.edu/">http://nonprofit.asu.edu.


Ashley Gilliam, ashley.gilliam">mailto:ashley.gilliam@asu.edu">ashley.gilliam@asu.edu
ASU Lodestar Center for Philanthropy and Nonprofit Innovation

Program provides opportunity in challenging job market


May 5, 2009

As people across Arizona search for employment, they may be overlooking the opportunity of a lifetime to invest in their own future.  Public Allies is one of the most highly regarded programs for those interested in the nonprofit sector seeking to gain knowledge and on-the-job training. Participants in Public Allies are diverse in culture, education, and professional background, but all share the drive to become new leaders who strengthen communities, nonprofits, and civic participation.

Public Allies is an AmeriCorps program of the ASU Lodestar Center for Philanthropy and Nonprofit Innovation.  This unique program identifies young, talented adults from diverse backgrounds and prepares them for careers working for community and social change.  Allies, the term used for those accepted to the Public Allies program, serve 10-month, 40-hour-a-week, paid apprenticeships at local nonprofits and participate in a rigorous and rewarding leadership development program with a diverse group of peers who are also of and working within their home community. Download Full Image

Allies are at a variety of life stages, and don’t always consider themselves “leaders” in the traditional sense. Many are like Rachel Finch, a 23 year-old Ally at Aid to Adoption of Special Kids (AASK), who never thought of herself as a leader, but through this experience realized that she had all the skills necessary to take charge and make a difference.  Another reason she was drawn to Public Allies was for the opportunity to experience a field before she invested in a degree.

“I’m getting all this experience in 10 months that I couldn’t get in a classroom environment,” says Finch.

Public Allies is for those who are truly dedicated, says Finch, who works at a spa when she is not at her 40-hour-a-week apprenticeship.  Despite her hectic schedule she says that it is definitely worth it.

“My favorite thing about Public Allies is the networking.  I get to hear from all the other Allies about how it is to work at their organization,” says Finch. “I’ve also learned very important tools like time and money management, organization, making positive connections with others, and a lot about what is happening in the community.”

Those who are accepted into the program receive priceless experience in a nonprofit organization as well as leadership development programming, with other added benefits to aid them in this time of personal and professional growth.  During the 10-month period there is a stipend of $13,500 and at the time of graduation from the program, a taxable educational credit of $4,725 is awarded to each Ally.  AmeriCorps health insurance is also issued to Allies during their apprenticeship.  Child care assistance is available if an Ally is eligible, as well as interest free loan deferment for qualified student loans.

Ally Jenn Sinkey, a 28 year-old single mom is also at AASK.  She is working on her social and community service degree and has another full-time job on top of her apprenticeship. The most important things that she says she has learned in this process have been how to be a better leader, and that she loves being out there with people and serving them in any way possible.  She believes that people should consider Public Allies to have the opportunity to serve in a tangible way instead of always just talking about it.

“Public Allies sets up the opportunities for you, and to participate is such a blessing,” says Sinkey.

The nonprofit organizations who partner with Public Allies reap numerous benefits from the partnership as well.  They get the opportunity to add a dedicated young person to their staff who is energetic and enthusiastic about the nonprofit sector.  The organization gets to create a wish list of projects they have hoped to initiate, but without the help of the Ally may not have the man power to accomplish.  Additionally, the cost of this great employee is much lower than that of any other full-time employee.

Steve Yamamori, Executive Director/CEO of Fighter Country Partnership, which supports and advocates for more than 6,000 airmen stationed at Luke Air Force Base in Glendale, Ariz., is in the first year of being a partner organization with Public Allies.

“I feel Public Allies trains the next generation of philanthropists,” says Yamamori, “and we need this service now more than ever.”

Public Allies began 17 years ago in Washington, D.C., and grew the next year to Chicago thanks to the founding Executive Director, and now First Lady Michelle Obama.  It is now in 15 communities and entering its fourth year in Phoenix.  Last year, 63 percent of the 20 graduates in Phoenix received job placement at their apprenticeships.  With a national unemployment rate of 8.1 percent in February, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, this program is giving hope for the future for those passionate about community and social change.

“The success of Public Allies in the three short years it has been here in Phoenix is tremendous,” says Public Allies Arizona Program Director Michelle Lyons-Mayer. “It’s an extremely rewarding experience to give these talented young adults the opportunity to learn about the nonprofit sector, outside and in, while also obtaining valuable leadership skills.”

May 29, 2009 is the application deadline for the upcoming program year.  Applicants must be between the ages of 18-30, be a U.S. citizen, and be available for a 40-50 hour a week internship.  If interested in learning more or desire to fill out an application, visit:  http://publicallies.asu.edu

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The ASU Lodestar Center for Philanthropy and Nonprofit Innovation (formerly the ASU Center for Nonprofit Leadership and Management), is recognized as a national leader in undergraduate and graduate nonprofit education, research and technical assistance. The ASU Lodestar Center exists to enhance the quality of life in communities through the advancement of nonprofit leadership practices and provides knowledge and tools to build the capacity of nonprofit organizations, professionals, board members, donors and volunteers by offering a selection of capacity building workshops, conferences, classes, and programs. For more information, visit: http://nonprofit.asu.edu/" target="_blank" title="http://nonprofit.asu.edu.

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/>Ashley Gilliam, ashley.gilliam">mailto:ashley.gilliam@asu.edu">ashley.gilliam@asu.edu
ASU Lodestar Center for Philanthropy and Nonprofit Innovation

Annual American Humanics Dinner honors students


May 1, 2009

The 29th annual dinner to honor Arizona State University’s American Humanics student achievements was held on April 29 at the Wyndham Phoenix Hotel.  The theme of the night was “One Voice, Many Missions: The artistry of the nonprofit sector,” which calls acknowledgement to the numerous people that contribute in various ways to the nonprofit sector. 

The keynote speaker was Patrick McWhortor, President and CEO of the Alliance of Arizona Nonprofits, who shared some inspirational thoughts on how this year’s graduates will impact the nonprofit sector.  Download Full Image

Student awards:

• Jaclyn Goris won the Camelback Kiwanis Award, which honors a returning American Humanics student who has provided outstanding leadership and potential in the nonprofit field.

• Emily Curry was awarded the Second Annual American Humanics Alumni Scholarship, a scholarship funded and awarded by AH alumni. The recipient is chosen based on his or her contribution to American Humanics, and the recipient’s ability to demonstrate utilization of his or her unique talents to benefit and strengthen the nonprofit sector.

• Jenna Schaefer was awarded the Graduating Senior Director’s Award, which honors a graduating American Humanics student who has provided exemplary leadership and maintained academic excellence.

• Candida Henriquez received the American Humanics Management Institute Director’s Award, which honors a returning student for his or her emerging leadership to support the Annual American Humanics Management/Leadership Institute (AHMI) campaign. This award provides support for the annual Management Institute in the name of a deserving undergraduate student through a financial contribution made in his or her name to the AHMI campaign.

• Samuel Richard earned the George F. Miller Outstanding Student Award, named in memory of the ASU American Humanics program founder, honoring an American Humanics student who displays exemplary qualities of leadership, academic achievement, and commitment to the youth and human service organization field.

• Kristina Oniszko won the Jack Armstrong Scholarship, which is awarded to a deserving undergraduate student in honor of Jack Armstrong, the founding Executive Director of American Humanics at Arizona State University. The scholarship was established by the First Gen AH Alumni, family and friends of Jack Armstrong.

Graduating seniors honored at the dinner: Frank Carbone, Ashley Collins, Traci Cowley, Emily Curry, Lauren Dunning, Jaclyn Goris, Candi Henriquez, Stanley Hopkins, Casey Johnson, Michal Kempton, Rachael Mangum, Erika Moore, Kristina Oniszko, Jonathan Pasquinelli, Alexandra Paul, Andrea Payne, Samuel Richard, Jenna Schaefer, and Jennifer Speer.

Stacey Freeman, Sr. Program Coordinator for ASU American Humanics, feels this dinner is a much needed reward for students who have accomplished so much throughout the year. 

“They are strong leaders and will positively impact the nonprofit sector for many years to come,” says Freeman. “They are dedicated to making a difference in the social sector, and that is why I love my job!”

Dr. Robert F. Ashcraft, executive director for ASU American Humanics, and professor of nonprofit studies in the School of Community Resources and Development says that ASU AH students are known as difference makers.  

“They not only excel as students in the classroom and as campus leaders, but as actively engaged citizens in their communities,” Ashcraft says. “More importantly, as alumni of the nation’s top ranked AH program they graduate as the best educated and most informed nonprofit leaders and managers available in the social sector today.”

Founded in 1980, ASU American Humanics is a program of the ASU College of Public Programs, in association with the ASU Lodestar Center for Philanthropy and Nonprofit Innovation. ASU is one of the leading programs in the nation, preparing future nonprofit professionals to work with America’s youth and families. Students pursuing American Humanics certification must complete various co-curricular requirements including active participation in the student association, 18 credit hours of in-class coursework, and a 12 credit hour internship. For more information, visit: http://www.asu.edu/copp/nonprofit/edu/ah.htm">http://www.asu.edu/copp/nonprofit/edu/ah.htm">http://www.asu.edu/copp/no....


Ashley Gilliam, ashley.gilliam">mailto:ashley.gilliam@asu.edu">ashley.gilliam@asu.edu
ASU Lodestar Center for Philanthropy and Nonprofit Innovation

Morrison welcomes Clark-Johnson


April 29, 2009

Sue Clark-Johnson, former president of the newspaper division of Gannett Co. Inc., the nation’s largest diversified news and information firm, has been appointed as executive director of ASU’s Morrison Institute for Public Policy.

Clark-Johnson, a longtime Arizona businesswoman, executive and leader, begins at the Morrison Institute May 1. After an intensive national search, Clark-Johnson replaces former Morrison director Rob Melnick, who left the position after more than 20 years of service to become executive dean of ASU’s Global Institute of Sustainability. Download Full Image

“Sue brings a unique energy and talent to social and cultural progress,” says ASU President Michael Crow. “We are very excited to have this level of talent and commitment working for the future of Arizona.”

As a former member of the Morrison Institute’s board of advisers, Clark-Johnson has long demonstrated support for the organization’s public policy research and activities.

“Sue Clark-Johnson’s connections to and enthusiasm for the Morrison Institute are well-established,” says board chairman Chris Herstam. “Her knowledge of Arizona issues, as well as her journalistic talents, will be of great value.”

The Morrison Institute bridges the gap between academic scholarship and public policy through research, evaluation and education for public- and private-sector clients.

The Morrison Institute is in ASU’s College of Public Programs.

Clark-Johnson retired from the Gannett Co. last May after 41 years in news and executive leadership roles. With a combined circulation of about 4 million, Gannett owns more than 85 daily newspapers. The newspaper division is Gannett’s largest, with about 80 Web sites and 1,000 weekly newspapers, shoppers and magazines.

“Sue’s experience, commitment to the future of Arizona, understanding of key policy issues and strategic acumen will advance Morrison’s quality, reach and impact,” says Debra Friedman, university vice president and dean of the College of Public Programs.

Prior to her role as president of the Gannett newspaper division, Clark-Johnson was chairman and chief executive officer of Phoenix Newspapers Inc., as well as senior group president of Gannett’s Pacific Newspaper Group, with oversight responsibility for 32 companies throughout the West.

Her career has been acknowledged with lifetime achievement awards from the Washington Women’s Center and the National Association of Female Executives, as well as a distinguished lifetime achievement award for diversity efforts from the National Association of Minority Media Executives and the Jerry J. Wisotsky Torch of Liberty Award from the Anti-Defamation League. She is a member of the Council of Foreign Relations and is on the board of directors of Pinnacle West, the Translational Genomics Research Institute and the Global Institute of Sustainability at ASU.

“I am honored and excited about the opportunity to lead the Morrison Institute for Public Policy,” Clark-Johnson says. “Morrison has a highly respected reputation in Arizona, in large measure due to its excellent research and leadership role in this state. It’s my hope and expectation that, working with the community, we can not only continue that fine tradition, but also expand and grow it as well.”

American Dream Academy wins community engagement award


April 27, 2009

An Arizona State University program that helps parents transform their children's educational experience has won the regional 2009 C. Peter Magrath University Community Engagement Award and is a finalist for the national award.

The American Dream Academy helps parents in low-income, disadvantaged areas learn how to transform their children's educational experience. It is the signature program of the Center for Community Development and Civil Rights at ASU's College of Public Programs on the Downtown Phoenix campus. Download Full Image

The program has "graduated" more than 7,000 parents of students attending 41 different schools, and indirectly impacted more than 24,000 low-income, minority youth throughout the greater Phoenix region since the program began three years ago.

Established in 2006, the C. Peter Magrath University Community Engagement Award recognizes the outreach and engagement partnerships of four-year public universities. The award program seeks to identify colleges and universities that have redesigned their learning, discovery, and engagement functions to become even more sympathetically and productively involved with their communities.

"This award recognizes an extraordinary partnership between ASU and the Phoenix K-12 educational community" says Raul Yzaguirre, Presidential Professor of Practice and Executive Director of the Center for Community Development and Civil Rights. "The program relies on collaborations with area school districts, as well as community leaders and community service organizations to operate and be successful."

Parents of K-12 students receive training through the nine-week program that creates a community where parents and teachers collaborate to improve each child's educational environment, both at home and at school, so that all children can achieve their greatest academic potential.

With a focus on retention, graduation and academic success, the American Dream Academy instills an understanding of the value of attaining an education, and can offer a pathway out of poverty for many people.

The American Dream Academy aims to improve parent/child relationships; reduce dropout rates and ensure high school graduation; improve classroom performance; and put children on a track to attend and be successful in a college or university and earn a diploma.

The award is named for C. Peter Magrath, who served as president of the Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities from 1992-2005. Made possible by a grant from the http://www.aplu.org/NetCommunity/page.redir?target=http%3a%2f%2fwww.wkkf... target="_blank">W.K. Kellogg Foundation, the Magrath Award includes $20,000 and a trophy. The regional outreach award is $6,000.

The ASU Center for Community Development and Civil Rights works to build bridges between ASU and the community to address problems, share knowledge and act as a catalyst for transformation. Its programs are designed to strengthen low-income, marginalized populations and help them become knowledgeable in education, finance, health care, and the basics of housing, transportation and local ordinances. For information about the Center, visit http://cdcr.asu.edu.">http://cdcr.asu.edu/">http://cdcr.asu.edu.

Emerging nonprofit leaders earn national recognition


April 27, 2009

Thirteen ASU American Humanics (AH) students have been awarded Next Generation Nonprofit Leaders Program (NextGen) scholarships and one student has been selected as a recipient of the 2009-10 American Humanics Academic Award. This all-time high number of ASU AH NextGen students will each receive $4,500 from NextGen as part of a multi-year Kellogg Foundation Grant to American Humanics, Inc. to support students across the American Humanics campus affiliate network. The NextGen scholarships support costs associated with the students’ senior internships in nonprofits. The Academic Award is a $1,000 scholarship; one of only 20 awarded out of over 90 applications. 

ASU American Humanics NextGen scholarship recipients:
• Frank Carbone, Jr. of Cleveland
• Emily Curry of Chandler, Ariz.
• Candida Henriquez of  Mesa, Ariz.
• Chris Maddox of Phoenix
• Rachael Mangum of Mesa, Ariz.
• Julianne Mate of Phoenix
• Erika Moore of Los Angeles
• Kristina Oniszko of Tucson, Ariz.
• Andrea Payne of Tempe, Ariz.
• Jenna Schaefer of St. Paul, Minn.
• Jennifer Speer of San Antonio
• Megan Trombetta of Phoenix
• Laura Zilverberg of Minneapolis Download Full Image

American Humanics Acadamic Award:
• Alexandra Paul of Phoenix

“Receiving 14 scholarships in one year is quite an accomplishment for the American Humanics program at ASU,” said Stacey Freeman, Program Coordinator, Sr. for the ASU AH program. “We are so proud of our students’ hard-work and dedication to both academics and the nonprofit sector.”

This group of scholarship recipients was awarded a total of $59,500. Since the establishment of the NextGen program, ASU AH students have received $103,500 in NextGen scholarships. In the past, nonprofits at which NextGen awardees have interned contributed $24,600 in match monies. That means, to date, ASU AH students have received a total of $128,100 in support of the costs associated with their senior internships. Alexandra Paul joins a long list of past ASU AH students to receive the American Humanics Academic Award, including Jenna Schaefer, a current recipient of the NextGen scholarship.

“ASU is a national leader in preparing next generation leaders for the nonprofit sector,” said Dr. Robert F. Ashcraft, director of the Lodestar Center for Philanthropy and Nonprofit Innovation and professor of nonprofit studies at ASU. “We have several programs and strategies in place to assure we are helping solve this human resource pipeline issue and our American Humanics program leads the way. Garnering this number of student awards is a testimony to the caliber of our AH students and their yearning to apply passion and competence to their nonprofit careers.”

Founded in 1980, ASU American Humanics is a program of the School of Community Resources and Development, in association with the ASU Lodestar Center for Philanthropy and Nonprofit Innovation (formerly the Center for Nonprofit Leadership and Management). ASU is one of the leading programs in the nation, preparing future nonprofit professionals. Students pursuing American Humanics certification complete various experiential requirements including active participation in the student association, 18 credit hours of in-class coursework, and a 12 credit hour internship. For more information, visit: http://www.asu.edu/copp/nonprofit/edu/ah.htm">http://www.asu.edu/copp/nonprofit/edu/ah.htm">http://www.asu.edu/copp/no....

The ASU Lodestar Center for Philanthropy and Nonprofit Innovation (formerly the ASU Center for Nonprofit Leadership and Management), is recognized as a national leader in undergraduate and graduate nonprofit education, research and technical assistance. The ASU Lodestar Center exists to enhance the quality of life in communities through the advancement of nonprofit leadership practices and provides knowledge and tools to build the capacity of nonprofit organizations, professionals, board members, donors and volunteers by offering a selection of capacity building workshops, conferences, classes, and programs. For more information, visit: http://nonprofit.asu.edu/" title="http://nonprofit.asu.edu.">http://nonprofit.asu.edu/">http://nonprofit.asu.edu.

ASU In the News

ASU policy analyst discusses Arizona teen survey


<p>Senior Policy Analyst Bill Hart spoke about a recent survey of Arizona teens by the ASU Morrison Institute for Public Policy during an April 9 segment of &quot;Arizona Illustrated,&quot; a program on Arizona Public Television.</p>The results of the survey were published in a report, &quot;Great Expectations: Arizona Teens Speak Up,&quot; the fourth issue of the Morrison Institute's Forum 411 briefing series. The report offers insights into the state's 600,000-plus adolescents from professionals who work with them every day and from teens themselves. <p>Key findings from the survey include: <b><br /></b></p><p> • Asked about the essential elements of a “good life,” most teens chose “doing work that you enjoy” and “having a happy family.”</p><p>• Asked whether a college degree is key to a good future, 88% agreed.</p><p>• Two-thirds (67%) of teens said they do volunteer work.</p><p>• Most teens say they have lots of friends (84%), enjoy diversity (93%), and look forward to the future (78%).</p><p>• Only 26% of teens agreed that “adults will leave the world in good shape for people my age”.</p> <p>To view the interview, visit: <a href="http://tinyurl.com/dda89w">http://tinyurl.com/dda89w</a>. To read the report, visit: <a href="http://www.asu.edu/copp/morrison/411_azteens.htm">http://www.asu.edu/cop.... </p>

Article Source: Arizona Public Media

Nominees sought for Arizona Behavioral Health Awards


March 25, 2009

Meeting the behavioral health needs of our fellow citizens can be challenging. Whether it takes the form of counseling a recovering methamphetamine user, providing housing to domestic violence victims, or launching a new outreach program for homeless individuals suffering from serious mental illness, working in the behavioral health field demands passion, compassion, perseverance, and dedication from those who serve.

In recognition of these efforts, Arizona State University's Center for Applied Behavioral Health Policy seeks nominations for the 2009 Arizona Behavioral Health Awards. All award recipients will be recognized at the Fifth Annual Arizona Behavioral Health Awards Gala on July 23, at the Hilton Sedona Resort and Conference Center. Download Full Image

Award categories

LEGACY AWARD
Recognizes an individual in the field of behavioral health services with a distinguished career of leadership and contribution to the behavioral health community of Arizona.

CULTURAL HERITAGE AWARD
Recognizes an individual or agency that has demonstrated a commitment to promoting understanding and celebration of the rich cultural heritage of the State of Arizona and those individuals and families impacted by issues of behavioral health.

LEADERSHIP IN ADVOCACY AWARD
In recognition of an individual, advocates, or persons in recovery or their family members, who has demonstrated leadership in the promotion of enhanced behavioral health for the citizens of Arizona.

LEADERSHIP IN SERVICES AWARD
In recognition of an individual employed within the behavioral health system who has shown leadership in his/her agency's provision of evidence-based services, and who exemplifies the core values of developing community, promoting communication and learning, demonstrating a compassion for individuals who have been disenfranchised or marginalized, and helping people, particularly those with behavioral health disabilities.

LEGISLATIVE LEADERSHIP AWARD
In recognition of an elected official, holding office at the local, state, or Federal level who has demonstrated sustained leadership in advocating for behavioral health services.

NOMINATION GUIDELINES

1. You may submit nominations in more than one category.

2. You may submit more than one nomination in each category.

3. Nominations must be postmarked NO LATER THAN April 30, 2009.

4. Nominations may be e-mailed to: linda.williamson@asu.edu or faxed to: (602) 942-0779.

Return completed form(s) to:
Arizona Behavioral Health Awards
c/o The Center for Applied Behavioral Health Policy
College of Public Programs
Arizona State University
P.O. Box 37100, MC 3252
Phoenix, AZ 85069-7100

To download the registration form, visit http://www.cabhp.asu.edu/pro-development/ldrform.pdf.">http://www.cabhp.asu.edu/pro-development/ldrform.pdf">http://www.cabhp.a...

Prisoner reentry is focus of April 3 conference at ASU


March 5, 2009

Arizona State University’s School of Criminology and Criminal Justice will host a daylong conference, “Prisoner Reentry: A Twenty-First Century Imperative,” on April 3 at the Mercado on ASU’s Downtown Phoenix campus, Building C, 502 E. Monroe St.

The three-session discussion is designed for researchers interested in criminal justice; policymakers responsible for shaping public safety or social services; practitioners in criminal justice interested in criminal justice policy, public safety, prisons and prisoner reentry; and students interested in the criminal justice system. Download Full Image

The conference takes on additional significance in light of a recently released report by the Pew Center on the States’ Public Safety Performance Project, which showed that for the first time in history more than one in every 100 adults in America are in jail or prison.  According to the report released Feb. 28, costs to states rise as prison populations increase, and last year, states spent more than $49 billion on corrections, up from $11 billion 20 years before.  With about half of released inmates returning to jail or prison within three years, the national recidivism rate remains virtually unchanged.

“The Pew Report notes that the state of Arizona is spending more than 45 other states on corrections as a percentage of the total state budget,” says Scott Decker, director of the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice, which is part of ASU’s College of Public Programs. “This conference is particularly important in these times, and the recommendations for policy change and practice change that will come from such a gathering will be received with a great deal of interest and attention.”

The conference will bring three criminal justice experts to the Valley.  In the opening session, Todd Clear, a Distinguished Professor in the Department of Law, Police Science and Criminal Justice Administration at the City University of New York’s (CUNY) John Jay College of Criminal Justice, will discuss community-level collateral consequences of mass incarceration.  The second session will be led by Beth Huebner, director of the graduate program at the University of Missouri – St. Louis Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice.  Huebner, whose expertise is in the areas of prisoner reentry and criminal justice decision-making, will explore long-term recidivism patterns of different types of offenders.  The day’s final session will consider family connections and prisoner reentry, and will be led by Damian Martinez.  Martinez is presently an assistant professor in Rutgers University’s School of Criminal Justice who will be joining ASU’s faculty in the fall.  His research expertise focuses on prisoner reentry and reintegration.

The three discussion leaders will be joined at the end of the day by Kathy Waters, the division director for Adult Probation Services for the Arizona Supreme Court, in a panel discussion that will review the conference’s three sessions.

The School of Criminology and Criminal Justice is committed to linking policy, research and practice by regularly sponsoring public events.  This is the second event in a series that examines issues such as violence, crime prevention, gangs, and strategic problem solving in criminal justice.

For information, call the school at 602-543-6607, or e-mail Betty.Sedillo">mailto:Betty.Sedillo@asu.edu">Betty.Sedillo@asu.edu.

Steve Des Georges

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