ASU Law announces new faculty honors


October 10, 2019

A law school is only as strong as its faculty. At the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law at Arizona State University, students learn from some of the nation’s foremost scholars and innovative legal instructors. They have played an integral role in ASU Law establishing itself as one of the highest ranked public law schools in the nation, a leading center of scholarly exchange with a tradition of exceptional bar passage and quality job-placement rates.

Among the notable faculty members are a distinguished group of honorees, newly listed as named chairs, professors, scholars or fellows, who bring a wealth of experience, diverse backgrounds and groundbreaking research to ASU Law. law professors ASU Law announces new faculty honors with professorship appointments to (from left): Zack Gubler, Linda DeMaine, Robert Miller, Karen Bradshaw and James G. Hodge Jr. Download Full Image

“We are indebted to our generous donors for affording us the opportunity to recruit, retain and recognize the most talented legal minds in the world,” ASU Law Dean Douglas Sylvester said. “Our faculty are as hardworking as they are talented, producing groundbreaking legal research while making incredible contributions to our law school and the surrounding community.”

Among the most recent additions to the list are the Roslyn O. Silver Professor of Law, the Marie Selig Professor of Law and the Mary Sigler Distinguished Research Scholar.

The newest honorific appointments among the ASU Law faculty are:

Willard H. Pedrick Distinguished Research Scholar: Karen Bradshaw

photo of Karen Bradshaw

Karen Bradshaw, Willard H. Pedrick Distinguished Research Scholar

The Pedrick Scholarship is named for Willard H. Pedrick, the founding dean of ASU Law.

Professor Karen Bradshaw teaches environmental law and researches governance of natural resources, with an emphasis on emerging regulatory approaches including certification regimes, public-private partnerships and collaborative settlements. Bradshaw is also a faculty affiliate scholar with the Classical Liberal Institute at New York University School of Law and Senior Sustainability Scientist at the Global Institute of Sustainability at Arizona State University. She is an expert on wildfire law and has also written about land development and forest management.

“I am deeply honored by this distinction,” Bradshaw said. “The Pedrick Scholarship affords me additional latitude to pursue interesting research.”

Bradshaw received her JD with honors from the University of Chicago Law School, where she was a Tony Patino Fellow, Olin Fellow and comment editor for the University of Chicago Law Review. She clerked for Judge E. Grady Jolly of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit. Before joining the ASU Law faculty, Bradshaw was the inaugural Koch-Searle Fellow in Legal Studies at New York University School of Law.

Bradshaw has published more than a dozen articles in law and peer-reviewed journals. She is the author of the forthcoming book “The New Animal Rights: How Uncovering the Biological Origins of Property Can Save America's Wildlife” (University of Chicago Press) and editor of the book “Wildfire: Law & Economics Policy Perspectives” (with Dean Lueck) (Routledge, 2012). She has presented at workshops and conferences at Columbia University, New York University, University of Chicago, Oxford University and Yale University.

Roslyn O. Silver Professor of Law: Linda DeMaine

photo of Linda DeMaine

Linda Demaine, Roslyn O. Silver Professor of Law

This new professorship honors the Honorable Roslyn O. Silver, a senior judge with the United States District Court for the District of Arizona who graduated from ASU Law in 1971 and teaches at the school. She is the first alumna to have an ASU Law professorship in her name.

The inaugural Roslyn O. Silver Professorship was awarded to Professor Linda Demaine. Demaine’s research and teaching at the law school focuses on issues at the intersection of law and psychology.

After receiving her JD and PhD in psychology, Demaine was a behavioral scientist and policy analyst at RAND, where she worked on projects including the prevalence and content of arbitration clauses in consumer contracts, the law and psychology of deception in defense of national computer systems, the use of the military for domestic civil law enforcement, and government issuance of patents on genes and other modified products of nature. Demaine has held an American Psychological Association Congressional Fellowship, through which she worked with the Senate Judiciary Committee on FBI and Department of Justice oversight, judicial nominations, and legislation. She also has held an American Psychological Association Science Policy Fellowship, working with the CIA’s Behavioral Sciences Unit.

“I’m honored to be the inaugural Roslyn O. Silver Professor of Law,” Demaine said. “With this title, I will strive to embody several of the admirable qualities for which Judge Silver is widely known — her deep-seated compassion, her dedication to fairness, her commitment to mentoring and her ability to bring her dog to work. The law school community and I greatly appreciate Judge Silver’s generous support.”

Marie Selig Professor of Law: Zack Gubler

photo of Zack Gubler

Zack Gubler, Marie Selig Professor of Law

The Marie Selig professorship was established to honor the mother of former Major League Baseball Commissioner Bud Selig, who serves as a Distinguished Professor of Sports in America at ASU Law. The inaugural Marie Selig Professorship was awarded to Professor Zachary Gubler, whose research interests lie in the areas of corporate law and financial and securities regulation.

“It is a great privilege to be named the Marie Selig Professor of Law," Gubler said. "This professorship is a moving tribute to Commissioner Selig’s mother, who was an educator, and I commit to do my best to always be deserving of such an honor. The influence that the Selig family’s generosity will have on ASU Law is shaping up to be as great as the influence that Commissioner Selig had on baseball, which of course landed him in the Hall of Fame.”

Gubler joined the ASU law faculty in 2011 after having spent two years at Harvard Law School as a Climenko Fellow. Prior to joining the academy, Gubler served as a law clerk to Judge Richard C. Wesley of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit.

Peter Kiewit Foundation Professor of Law: James G. Hodge Jr.

photo of James Hodge

James G. Hodge Jr., Peter Kiewit Foundation Professor of Law

The Nebraska-based Peter Kiewit Foundation, established in 1979, honors philanthropist Peter Kiewit of the Kiewit Corporation, one of the largest construction and engineering companies in North America.

Professor James G. Hodge Jr., who joined ASU Law in 2009, is the director of ASU’s Center for Public Health Law and Policy. Through scholarship, teaching and applied projects, Hodge delves into multiple areas of health law, public health law, global health law, ethics and human rights. Since 2010, he has also served as director of the Western Region Office of the Network for Public Health Law, funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Since its inception, the office has assisted lawyers, health officials, practitioners, students and others nationally on over 3,300 claims. 

“I am deeply honored to be named the Peter Kiewit Foundation Professor of Law,” Hodge said. “The foundation has a rich history of funding and overseeing projects and interests for the benefit of communities across the United States. Its interests are at the heart of my own work to improve health across populations through effective laws and policies. When Dean Sylvester notified me of my selection for this professorship, I reflected on the wonderful commitment that ASU Law has made to our collective work in public health law and policy. As we celebrate the 10th anniversary of our Center for Public Health Law and Policy, I am grateful to collaborate with elite faculty and students at ASU Law and nationally, committed, like the foundation, to the role of communities in society.”

Hodge is a prolific scholar, having published more than 200 articles in journals of law, medicine, public health and bioethics; two books in public health law; 25 book chapters; and guest edited four symposium issues in the Journal of Law, Medicine, and Ethics, Jurimetrics and the Annals of Health Law. He is regularly ranked among the top 3% of cited authors in the Social Science Research Network.

Willard H. Pedrick Distinguished Research Scholar: Robert Miller

photo of Robert Miller

Robert Miller, Willard H. Pedrick Distinguished Research Scholar

The Pedrick Scholarship is named for Willard H. Pedrick, the founding dean of ASU Law.

Professor Robert J. Miller joined ASU Law in 2013. His areas of expertise are federal Indian law, American Indians and international law, American Indian economic development, Native American natural resources and civil procedure. He is an enrolled citizen of the Eastern Shawnee Tribe.

"I was surprised and very delighted to hear that I was appointed a Willard H. Pedrick Distinguished Research Scholar by my dean and faculty,” Miller said. “It is especially satisfying to be honored in this fashion by the colleagues that I work with on a daily basis."

Before joining ASU Law, Miller was on the faculty of Lewis & Clark Law School from 1999 to 2013. Prior to his career in academia, he practiced Indian law with Hobbs, Straus, Dean & Walker, and practiced litigation for the Stoel Rives law firm. Following graduation from law school, he clerked for Judge Diarmuid O’Scannlain of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit.

Miller’s scholarly works include articles, books and book chapters on a wide array of federal Indian law issues and civil procedure, and he speaks regularly on Indian law issues across the U.S. and in other countries.

He has written "Reservation 'Capitalism:' Economic Development in Indian Country" (Praeger 2012) and "Native America, Discovered and Conquered: Thomas Jefferson, Lewis & Clark, and Manifest Destiny" (Praeger 2006); and has co-authored "Creating Private Sector Economies in Native America: Sustainable Development Through Entrepreneurship" (Cambridge University Press 2019) and "Discovering Indigenous Lands: The Doctrine of Discovery in the English Colonies" (Oxford University Press 2010).

Nicole Almond Anderson

Director of Communications, Sandra Day O'Connor College of Law

480-727-6990

New Emeritus Suite opens in School of Life Sciences

Remodeled space encourages collaboration and continued scholarship


October 7, 2019

Academics spend decades doing research, teaching and public outreach. When they finally reach retirement, many choose to stay involved in their fields and continue serving as mentors, even if they don’t maintain an active lab.

However, their offices are often spread throughout several buildings or on different floors, and opportunities to engage with their colleagues become more difficult once faculty members retire. Ron Rutowski, Professor Emeritus Ron Rutowski, an emeritus professor with the ASU School of Life Sciences, remains an active mentor and teaches regularly in graduate courses and in adult learning classes. He recently moved into the newly remodeled Emeritus Suite in the School. Photo by Jacob Sahertian/ASU VisLab Download Full Image

But the Arizona State University School of Life Sciences has opened a new, innovative Emeritus Suite with the goal of creating opportunities for collaboration and building upon decades of expertise and knowledge.

Kevin McGraw, a professor with the school and associate director of facilities, spearheaded the effort, along with facilities staff members. They converted several offices into a suite with communal space, desks and some larger, individual offices. To date, 10 emeritus professors have joined the suite.

“We thought it would be a neat initiative to bring everyone together and inspire many collaborations, cooperation and lifelong learning by activating a single space that has a bit of a mixed model to the housing arrangements,” McGraw said. “We have the ability to place individuals in their own offices if they are still very active with grants and mentoring, or maybe in some intermediate space where they have their own desk in a shared location and they visit weekly or monthly. In addition, we have a larger social area with desks and computers where people might come in a few times a year to interact with their peers and get some work done.”

Life Sciences Emeritus Suite

The new 1,000-square-foot suite is currently set up to house 12 emeritus professors. The recently opened suite is located near three active research centers that the school hopes will provide inspiration and interaction.

Ron Rutowski, a recently retired School of Life Sciences professor who remains actively involved studying coloration in animals — in particular, butterflies — said the space is vibrant and he’s pleased to have space as part of the suite.

“It’s outfitted nicely and laid out nicely. I’m using my office regularly,” Rutowski said. “If nothing else, I hope this draws attention to the fact that there are emeritus faculty who are around and active and available for whatever people think we might do. I still serve on graduate student committees and give occasional guest lectures in colleague’s classes. I still use my expertise in graduate-level classes as well.” 

Joseph Carter, dean of the Emeritus College at ASU and professor emeritus with W. P. Carey School of Business, said 40% of tenured faculty are age 60 or older. By intentionally setting aside space for emeritus faculty, Carter said the investment will pay off.

“I’m very impressed by this space. It’s a deliberate commitment to utilize emeritus faculty who by definition are well-renowned and dedicated to the school. And use them as an asset not only for themselves but also for the school and the university’s goals,” Carter said. “People are living longer, people are staying active, and people want to continue to contribute. Maybe they won’t want to hold down a tenure track position and all the administrative work that goes with that, but want to continue their academic pursuits. And there are some that just want to go spend time with their grandkids, and that’s OK, too.”

Sandra Leander

Assistant Director of Media Relations, ASU Knowledge Enterprise

480-965-9865

Researcher Paul Martin named 2019 Leading Edge Award winner


September 30, 2019

At its annual conference in Toronto on Sept. 21-24, the Association of Science and Technology Centers (ASTC), the professional association for science centers and museums, awarded Arizona State University researcher Paul Martin the 2019 Roy. L. Shafer Leading Edge Award for Leadership in the Field (non-CEO). Martin is co-director of the Center for Innovation in Informal STEM Learning and a research professional in the School for the Future of Innovation in Society. 

His exemplary leadership during the past three years has helped reinvigorate and expand the impact of the long-running National Informal STEM Education Network through his role as principal investigator of the new Space and Earth Informal STEM Education (SEISE) project. SEISE leverages and expands the NISE Network to include many new participants and viability for another decade, ensuring its continued impact on the missions and activities of hundreds of ASTC-member organizations and their local community and scientific collaborators.   Research Professor Paul Martin giving remarks at the ASTC Annual Conference Research Professor Paul Martin gives remarks at the ASTC Annual Conference in Toronto. Photo courtesy of ASTC Download Full Image

The SEISE project, funded by NASA and using the NISE Network structure, has sent tool kits to as many as 350 museums and science centers and a small footprint exhibition to 52 museums, and developed online training programs for distribution across the entire network to educate the public on various aspects of earth and space science.

Given the number of institutions supported by NISE Net and the number of visitors and the meaning of these institutions to their communities, Paul’s achievement in sustaining the network through SEISE is a tremendous one, worthy of the Shafer Leading Edge Award,” said David Guston, foundation professor and director for the School for the Future of Innovation in Society. 

Prior to joining ASU, Paul held leadership positions at the Science Museum of Minnesota; the Minnesota Historical Society; the Field Museum of Natural History; Museum Content Builders, Inc.; and Jim Henson Productions, Inc.

Senior Manager, Communications and Marketing Strategy, School for the Future of Innovation in Society

480-727-6193

ASU 365 Community Union presents Movies on the Field: 'Toy Story 4' and 'The Lion King'

Film screenings at Sun Devil Stadium free and open to the public


September 23, 2019

After screening blockbuster hits like "Sorry to Bother You" and "Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse" last year, ASU 365 Community Union is back with its Movies on the Field film series at Sun Devil Stadium — now free to the public.

First up at 7 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 5, is the latest installment in the Toy Story series: "Toy Story 4." Major complications ensue when Bonnie turns a spork into a toy, but he sees himself as an eating utensil instead. Woody, Buzz and Co. have to set out into the world to find him, reunite with Bonnie and resolve his existential crisis. Movie posters for Toy Story 4 and Lion King "Toy Story 4" and "The Lion King" are coming to Sun Devil Stadium on Oct. 5 and Oct. 26, respectively. The events — including the Foodie Bowl happening Oct. 26 in conjunction with the screening — are free and open to the public. Download Full Image

On Saturday, Oct. 26, Disney's 2019 "The Lion King" will be shown in conjunction with a food event. The 365 Community Union is partnering with Hawker Street Market for the first-ever Foodie Bowl from 4 to 10 p.m. that day. Admission is free.

Visitors to the Foodie Bowl can choose from more than 20 specialty vendors serving food ranging from bao burgers and sushi tacos to boba and unicorn elotes. Shop local retailers, and cheer on the brave souls attempting to battle the flaming hot spicy noodles challenge.

At 7 p.m., "The Lion King" will be shown. This critically acclaimed version stars Beyoncé, Seth Rogen, John Oliver, Donald Glover and many more. A young lion returns to reclaim the throne that was stolen from him and his father by his treacherous and fratricidal uncle after spending his childhood in exile under the care of a friendly warthog and meerkat. Watch the award-winning cast on the big screen while sitting under the stars on the Sun Devil Stadium field.

Visit asu365communityunion.com/movies for more information and to RSVP. 

Marketing Coordinator, ASU Cultural Affairs

Restored Vietnam helicopter on display at ASU Gammage for ‘Miss Saigon’


September 23, 2019

Blades of rescue in the chaos of war, the flying model of a Huey helicopter in Broadway’s “Miss Saigon” has been leaving audiences in awe for decades — and an authentic Huey helicopter will be in the parking lot of ASU Gammage weeknights during the show's run.

The utility military gunship seen in the show is often seen as a staple of the Vietnam War — and one of the surviving Huey helicopters is housed right here in the Valley of the Sun. A Huey helicopter will be available for show-goers to view from 4 to 7:30 p.m Sept. 24–27 .  A Huey helicopter housed at the Arizona Commemorative Air Force Museum. Download Full Image

The Arizona Commemorative Air Force Museum showcases an authentic Bell UH-1 Huey Gunship that served in Vietnam from 1965 to 1971.

Thanks to the Arizona chapter of the Army Aviation Heritage Foundation (AAHF), visitors of the museum are able to see a fully restored Huey helicopter with over 100 bullet patches.

AAHF is a national nonprofit organization of volunteers dedicated to connecting the American soldier to the American family through stories and artifacts.

In 2015, Dave Sale, a member of the Commemorative Air Force and founder of the AAHF’s Arizona chapter, decided to contact AAHF’s hangar in Georgia to work on bringing a Huey helicopter to the Arizona base at Falcon Field.  

“It’s the iconic bird of Vietnam,” Sale said. “People were asking, ‘Where is your Huey?’”

After just a few months, Sale and AAHF were able to locate the first Huey helicopter to bring to Arizona for restoration and to put on display at the Arizona Commemorative Air Force Museum.

Volunteers with AAHF work to obtain, restore and maintain the aircrafts to look not only look like museum quality, but keep in flyable condition. AAHF works to locate veterans who are experienced with the aircrafts to lead groups of volunteers through the restoration and operation process — which includes buffing, repainting and pressure-washing the aircrafts.

While locating and polishing aircrafts is a large part of AAHF, Sale said it is not the organization’s only goal.

“A main priority of ours is to have a place where veterans can share and listen to stories,” Sale said.

Sale spoke about AAHF’s community involvement with students through internship programs and families coming together to understand this crucial moment in U.S. history.

“We want to get our story out about army aviation,” Sale said. “Especially in Vietnam.”

For more information on the Army Aviation Heritage Foundation, visit armyav.org or call 770-897-0444. For more information on the Arizona Commemorative Air Force Museum, visit azcaf.org or call 480-924-1940.

Marketing assistant, ASU Gammage

ASU orchestras' 2019-20 season dialogues masterworks, contemporary works


September 16, 2019

From some of the most celebrated masterworks to collaborations with living composers, multimedia artists and world-class soloists, the ASU School of Music orchestras' 2019-20 season ventures beyond previous seasons with performances aimed to rejuvenate orchestral repertoire.

“I’m tremendously excited about the upcoming season,” said Jeffery Meyer, associate professor in the ASU School of Music and director of ASU orchestras. “Audiences and students will be hard-pressed to find another orchestra in the country, whether professional or academic, that is expanding and curating the orchestral repertoire in the way that we are doing here at ASU. This year’s season will be measured not by whom it excludes, but by whom (and what) it includes. We are doing this without turning our back on the bedrock orchestral masterpieces that are at the heart of our tradition and art, and I hope that the way the ‘standard’ repertoire is integrated into new contexts, side-by-side with new works and sounds, will breathe new life into older works as well.” ASU orchestras The ASU Symphony Orchestra. Download Full Image

Meyer, winner of the 2019 American Prize – Vytautas Marijosius Memorial Award in Orchestral Programming for the best achievement in the unique field of orchestral programming, is recognized for placing key masterworks of orchestral repertoire in dialogue with contemporary pieces in a way that advances the cultural experience of orchestral music.

The ASU orchestras are creating a new model for professional and preprofessional arts organizations that value the diverse potential of human creativity by offering some of the most enriching, innovative and technically outstanding concerts in the field today.

Tickets are available through the ASU Gammage box office, with free admission to some concerts as noted. General-admission tickets are $12 at the box office; fees apply for online advance purchase. Free ASU student tickets are available.

Northern Lights: Centenary Celebration of Sibelius’ Fifth Symphony
ASU Symphony Orchestra
Jeffery Meyer, conductor
Katherine McLin, violin
7:30 p.m. Sept. 21, ASU Gammage, ticketed

The ASU Symphony Orchestra opens its 2019-20 season with Sibelius’ soaring Symphony No. 5 in honor of the work’s centenary. The concert begins with Latvian composer Pēteris Vasks’ evocative concerto for violin and string orchestra “Tālā gaisma” or “Distant Light” featuring ASU’s Katherine McLin as violin soloist.

Towards a More Perfect Union, ASU Gammage Beyond
ASU Symphony Orchestra
Jeffery Meyer and Daniel Roumain, co-directors
7 p.m. Oct. 5, ASU Gammage, ticketed

ASU Gammage Beyond, in collaboration with the ASU Symphony Orchestra, invites you to a theatrical concert with film and spoken word, highlighting new works and powerful compositions that speak to the challenges of our time. Works by Tamar-kali (Academy Award-nominated film "Mudbound"), Daniel Bernard Roumain (New York Times top 10 classical new works), Joel Thompson (ASU Projecting All Voices Fellow), Carlos Simon (Sundance/Time Warner Composer Fellow), renowned spoken-word artist Marc Bamuthi Joseph and Grammy winners Joan Tower and Martha Gonzalez.

Joan Tower: "Made in America"
Martha Gonzalez: "Vendedores en Accion & Fandango Fronterizo" (World premier, arr. Noah Luna)
Carlos Simon: "This Land" (World premiere, ASU Symphony & ASU Beyond Competition Winner)
Tamar-kali: Excerpts from "Red Rice, Cotton and Indigo" (World premiere)
Daniel Bernard Roumain: "Cipher" (World premiere)
Joel Thompson: "La Lluvia" (World premiere)

ASU Orchestral Strings Graduate Recital
ASU Chamber Orchestra
Yun Song Tay, conductor
Francisco Hernández Bolaños, conductor
7:30 p.m. Oct. 9, Katzin Concert Hall, free admission

The strings of the ASU Chamber Orchestra immerse the listener in a landscape of works spanning over a century from the late romantic to the 20th century avant-garde under the batons of ASU Assistant Conductors Yun Song Tay and Francisco Hernández Bolaños.

Takemitsu: "Three Film Scores"
Ligeti: "Ramifications"
Elgar: "Serenade for Strings"
Britten: "Simple Symphony"

Schoenberg’s New World: Schoenberg, Korngold, Copland
ASU Symphony Orchestra
Jeffery Meyer, conductor
Michelle Di Russo, conductor
Jennifer Son, cello (2019 ASU Concerto Competition winner)
7:30 p.m. Nov. 8, ASU Gammage, ticketed

This concert features a dynamic collection of works written or revised in post-World War II United States. The first half of the concert presents works by Schoenberg and Korngold, both Austro-Hungarian Jewish refugees working in the United States after fleeing Europe in the 1930s. The concert concludes with Copland’s monumental Symphony No. 3, a work that some have called the “Great American Symphony,” expressing the spirit of a hopeful nation emerging from a generation of war.

ASU Professor Sabine Feisst, a world-renowned expert on Schoenberg, will offer a pre-concert talk revealing the historical and biographical context of these works. Her most recent book, “Schoenberg’s Correspondence with American Composers,” was published by Oxford University Press in 2018.

Schoenberg: "Five Pieces"
Korngold: Cello Concerto
Copland: Symphony No. 3

Fall Conductors' Concert
ASU Studio Orchestra
7:30 p.m. Nov. 20, Katzin Concert Hall, free admission

Graduate students in conducting lead the ASU Studio Orchestra in an exciting evening of music.

Mozart’s Kings: 'Coronation Mass' and 'Jupiter Symphony'
ASU Chamber Orchestra
ASU Chamber Singers and Choral Union
Jeffery Meyer and David Schildkret, conductors
Jiji Kim, guitar
7:30 p.m. Dec. 3, ASU Gammage, ticketed

Join the ASU Chamber Orchestra and ASU choirs in two of Mozart’s most celebrated masterworks. Guitar virtuoso and ASU faculty member Jiji Kim brings a slice of modernity to the concert, performing Hilary Purrington’s 2019 concerto “Harp of Nerves.”

Mozart: "Coronation Mass," K.317, C major
Hilary Purrington: "Harp of Nerves" (Concerto for Guitar and Orchestra, 2019)
Mozart: Symphony No. 41, K.551, C major 

ASU Concerto Competition Finalist Concert
4 p.m. Jan. 30, Katzin Concert Hall, free admission

Join us as the finalists in the 2020 ASU Concerto Competition compete for the chance to perform with ASU's top ensembles.

Ravel, Kaminsky and Beethoven’s 'Pastoral Symphony'
ASU Chamber Orchestra
Jeffery Meyer, conductor
Ursula Oppens, piano
7:30 p.m. Feb. 8, ASU Gammage, ticketed

The ASU Chamber Orchestra joins the global celebration of Beethoven’s 250th birthday with Beethoven’s beloved "Pastoral Symphony." The Grammy-nominated pianist Ursula Oppens joins the ASUCO on the first half of the concert performing Laura Kaminsky’s Piano Concerto.

Maurice Ravel: "Ma Mère l'Oye (Mother Goose)"
Laura Kaminsky: Piano Concerto (2011)
Beethoven: Symphony No. 6 “Pastoral”

Mazzoli, Pann and Dvorak Symphony No. 8
ASU Symphony Orchestra
Jeffery Meyer and Yun Song Tay, conductors
Christopher Creviston, saxophone
7:30 p.m. Feb. 29, ASU Gammage, ticketed
4 p.m. March 1, Scottsdale Center for the Performing Arts, ticketed

Dvorak’s “Festival March” and Symphony No. 8 bookend this concert of thrilling new works by two major American composers: the other-worldly “Sinfonia for Orbiting Spheres” by Missy Mazzoli (Chicago Symphony composer-in-residence) and a world premiere performance of a new concerto written for the ASU Symphony Orchestra and saxophonist Christopher Creviston by Carter Pann (2016 Pulitzer Prize finalist in music).

Weber, Liszt and Shostakovich Symphony No. 5
ASU Symphony Orchestra
Jeffery Meyer, Michelle Di Russo and Francisco Hernández Bolaños, conductors
Aoshuang Li, piano (2019 ASU Concerto Competition winner)
7:30 p.m. April 2, ASU Gammage, ticketed
3 p.m. April 5, Yavapai College Performing Arts Center, Prescott, Arizona

Virtuosic romantic works by Weber and Liszt provide the first-half counterpoint to Shostakovich’s searing Symphony No. 5, written at the height of the Stalinist purges of the 1930s. Ever since its storied premiere in St. Petersburg in 1937, it continues to be performed and remembered among the most moving and dramatic works of its time.

Weber: "Overture to Der Freischütz"
Liszt: Piano Concerto No. 1
Dmitry Shostakovich: Symphony No.5

Spring Conductors' Concert
ASU Studio Orchestra
7:30 p.m. April 13, Katzin Concert Hall, free admission

Graduate students in conducting lead the ASU Studio Orchestra in an exciting evening of music.

Mahler Symphony No. 2 'Resurrection'
ASU Symphony Orchestra
ASU Chamber Singers, Choral Union and Concert Choir
Jeffery Meyer, conductor
Carole FitzPatrick, soprano
Stephanie Weiss, mezzo-soprano
7:30 p.m. April 30, ASU Gammage, ticketed

The ASU Symphony Orchestra is joined by Carole FitzPatrick, Stephanie Weiss and the ASU choirs to end the 2019-20 season with Mahler’s epic Symphony No. 2. An all-embracing narrative continuing the metaphysical questions posed by Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony, the work immerses the listener in a journey through life and death, traversing funeral rites and the marching dead, existential crisis and, finally, the soul’s ultimate redemption.

Lynne MacDonald

communications specialist, School of Music

480-727-7189

Seeking nominations for the 2020 ASU MLK Jr. Student Servant-Leadership Award


August 30, 2019

Colleen Jennings-Roggensack, Arizona State University vice president for cultural affairs and ASU Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. committee chair, is soliciting nominations for the 2020 ASU Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Student Servant-Leadership Award. This year’s theme is “We are all connected.”

The ASU MLK Jr. Committee will present a Servant-Leadership Award to an ASU student at the MLK Breakfast on Jan. 23, 2020 at the Polytechnic campus.  Download Full Image

Servant-leadership is a practical philosophy that supports people who choose to serve first and then lead as a way of expanding service to individuals and institutions. Servant leaders may or may not hold formal leadership positions. Servant-leadership encourages collaboration, trust, foresight, listening and the ethical use of power and empowerment.

The committee requests the help of the ASU community in identifying a student servant-leadership awardee. The student must be currently enrolled full time, exemplify the ideals of servant-leadership and have a track record of commitment through volunteer service. A candidate may submit his or her resume with this form. Letters of recommendation are acceptable, but no more than two. Self-nominations are encouraged.

The ASU MLK Jr. Committee will provide a $1,500 scholarship to the awardee to be used toward his or her educational costs. This scholarship is available to ASU full-time undergraduate or graduate students. The winner must be a full-time student during the spring 2020 semester.

All applications will be reviewed and three finalists will be selected. Finalists will have 30-minute interviews with the committee on Friday, Oct. 18. Finalists will be contacted for their interview. The awardee must be able to attend the breakfast on Jan. 23.

Nominate yourself or another student.

Please submit this nomination by close of business on Tuesday, Oct. 1. Scan and e-mail to Michelle Johnson at mmjcap@asu.edu with the subject line: 2020 MLK Student Nomination – Last name of candidate.

Marketing assistant, ASU Gammage

 
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ASU Library opens new spaces, services for fall semester

August 22, 2019

There are many ways to reinvent a library. This academic year, the Arizona State University Library will introduce you to a few of them.   

Just in time for the start of the fall semester, and amidst a major renovation, Hayden Library has opened the Concourse level, the first newly designed space of the Hayden2020 reinvention project.

The Concourse connects the lower levels of ASU’s largest library to its four-story, above-ground tower, set to open its doors this January.

“The ASU community will be glad to know that the Hayden Library has grown bigger this semester, not smaller,” said Tomalee Doan, associate university librarian for Engagement and Learning Services. “With the opening of the Concourse level, and as we get closer to 2020, students can expect to see greater options for studying, learning and research support.”

Eight new classrooms have been added to Hayden Library's Concourse, along with a new library entrance on the north side of the library near the School of Life Sciences. 

In addition to the new classrooms, Hayden Library now features more meeting and study space with enhanced casual seating options to make students feel more comfortable and supported during their study sessions and group work. 

Students looking to take a break and relax now have the option to browse a variety of themed book collections scattered throughout the new space or get a bite to eat at the P.O.D market.

The Hayden Library Concourse also houses an interfaith reflection room, for prayer and meditation, a wellness room and gender-inclusive restrooms. 

“We are nearing the finish line of the transformation of Hayden Library, and the new spaces that have opened this semester are a reflection of that,” Doan said. “It’s just the beginning of what’s to come.”

No more paywall 

If you are a current student, faculty or staff member enjoying your free digital access to the New York Times, then you will be happy to know that you also have free digital access to the Wall Street Journal (WSJ).

All you need to do is activate the account

The WSJ service can be accessed via tablet, smartphone app or the web, and the service includes resources for faculty to seamlessly integrate content into course pages in facilitating classroom discussion of relevant and timely news stories. 

Student accounts will stay active until their graduation date, while faculty and staff will need to validate their memberships once a year.  

For ASU students, faculty and staff seeking thoughtful entertainment — everything from Chaplin to foreign and independent films — high quality video content is available to stream free of charge via the Kanopy platform.

An on-demand streaming service for public libraries and universities, Kanopy features a large, curated collection of diverse, unique and award-winning films and documentaries.

To start streaming, all you need to do is sign up.

Boost your research

Several new support offerings for researchers are available through the ASU Library this semester.

Among them is Researcher Support, offering ASU researchers guidance across the research lifecycle, from planning to data storage, in an effort to maximize the quality, productivity and accessibility of ASU research.

For ASU students looking to gain the research skills that will help them succeed in graduate school, the Graduate Scholars Toolkit is a series of one-hour workshops offered at various times throughout the semester on a variety of topics, including copyright, citation management, collaboration and data sharing tools, data visualization and text analysis.

The workshops are offered on all campuses with more online offerings to come.

For students, faculty and staff looking for research opportunities in data science, the Unit for Data Science and Analytics is launching its Open Lab for the 2019–20 academic year. 

A weekly event in Hayden Library, the Open Lab brings together researchers interested in collaborating and learning new skills with ongoing and available projects that engage machine learning, data visualization, text and data mining, network analysis and more.

In addition to Open Lab, the Unit for Data Science and Analytics is also open for collaborations with faculty and staff. 

“Our model is to do great work in interdisciplinary data science, and we want to make sure we include as many people as possible, whether faculty, student or staff,” said Michael Simeone, director of data science for the ASU Library.

The lab also directly mentors students and teams, meeting by appointment for developing their experiments and studies. All skill levels are welcome. 

Interested in data science and/or Open Lab? Reach out to the team for more information. 

Get your books delivered 

Need to pick up some books but can’t make it to the library?

Get them delivered!  

Secure, self-service book delivery lockers are now available in Armstrong Hall on the Tempe campus to allow for the quick and convenient picking up and returning of library materials. 

All you need is your Sun Card. 

Top photo: Student worker Max Stokes, a junior in global studies, shelves book collections related to the content to be taught in nearby classrooms. Photo by Charlie Leight/ASU Now

 
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Record class hits the books as ASU bucks national trend of declining enrollment

August 21, 2019

First-year cohort is the largest, most diverse and most academically prepared to attend university to date

Editor's note: This story is being highlighted in ASU Now's year in review. Read more top stories from 2019.

When Tucson native Sadie Azersky started exploring colleges, she set her sights on attending a school that would challenge her.

She found what she was looking for at Arizona State University: the opportunities of a large research university combined with the intimate setting of Barrett, The Honors College. She starts classes Thursday.  

"I'm able to have those big-school-type of experiences ... but also have a smaller-school environment at the same time, a community that's more accessible," said the music theory and composition major and President's Scholar, who said she is also drawn to the interdisciplinary opportunities offered by the Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts.

Azersky is just one of nearly 14,000 first-year students stepping foot on an Arizona State University campus this fall, the largest, most diverse and most academically prepared class to attend the university to date.

That’s a 10% increase in the size of ASU’s first-year class compared with last year. And it comes at a time when enrollment in colleges and universities around the country is actually declining, distinguishing ASU as a success story amid an otherwise unfortunate national trend.

“We have put significant effort into improving the college attendance rate in the state of Arizona, and our 2019 enrollment growth is a reflection of that commitment and of our demonstrated high-quality of educational outcomes at an affordable cost,” said Mark Searle, ASU’s executive vice president and university provost.

Arizona residents constitute about 8,600 students in the first-year class, and California students make up an additional 1,400. Those are increases of 7% and 8%, respectively.

The demand for higher education in the state of Arizona and the desire by students from out of state to come to ASU to study has driven the total university enrollment up nearly 8% this fall. There are now nearly 119,000 undergraduate and graduate students attending the university this semester. ASU is serving more nontraditional students, many seeking out ASU Online degrees for the flexibility to meet life and work demands.

The incoming first-year class is the most academically talented to ever be admitted to ASU. The average SAT score for first-year students increased five points over last year, and about 55% of the class earned one of the university's top three academic scholarships, collectively called the New American University Scholarships. Of the Arizona resident first-year students, 58% received a New American University Scholarship, and the majority of students receiving a coveted Flinn Scholarship — a merit-based scholarship for Arizona students to attend an Arizona university — chose to come to ASU.

RELATED: ASU a top producer of students who win Fulbright awards

ASU has also seen an increase in first-year enrollment from families with lower to moderate income levels. A deep and sustained commitment to accessibility and affordability for Arizona resident students, demonstrated by family and student outreach programs and access to financial aid, has led to a 10% increase in enrollment of students from families earning below $40,000 per year.

Once they’re here, the university dedicates vast efforts and resources to ensure students are successful. And it’s having an effect. The number of students returning to ASU this fall for their second year is also higher than at any time in the past. That so-called “one-year retention rate,” which measures students who stay at the university after their first year, is an important predictor of eventually earning a degree. ASU’s retention rate is nearly 86% overall, and nearly 88% for Arizona resident students.

Those resources are what drew Catherine Nunez to ASU. The National Hispanic Scholar from La Grange Park, Illinois, wanted not just a stellar engineering program but a place she felt wanted.

"The school really had the support and attention that I needed," said Nunez, who had looked into a big-name program in a neighboring state but said she hadn't felt welcome there. "I feel like I was wanted (at ASU), like I would be cared for here and have access to the resources I need."

The Barrett honors student will study biomedical engineering with the goal of working in the neuroscience field. And it wasn't just the university's academic prowess that drew her, but its mission of inclusion.

"We are defined by who we include, not who we exclude," said Nunez, echoing the words of the ASU charter, "and given all these choices of elite schools that only accept X percentage of kids, I think it's really important to include everyone. ... Everyone really does offer their own special thing, and recognizing that is something ASU does well."

Video: Where do ASU students come from? Everywhere

By Linda Nguyen

More facts about ASU:

  • The university offers students more than 350 undergraduate majors and 450 graduate degree and certificate programs, including the newly launched disability studies bachelor's degree and the stackable online master's degree in supply chain management in collaboration with MIT.
  • Of full-time first-year students, 162 are veteran or active-duty military, a 14% increase over fall 2018. For all years, there are 9,063 military-affiliated students enrolled at ASU campuses and ASU Online, 9% more than last year.
  • The number of students transferring to the university is up 2.9%
  • Students who are in the first generation in their family to attend college make up 29% of the first-year class
  • Enrollment of international first-year and transfer students is up 19%.

During their first week on campus, Sun Devils are immersed in the philanthropic culture of the university and all the opportunities available to become involved. Passport to ASU, a Welcome Week event, featured more than 500 student clubs and organizations. Sun Devils can get involved with an existing organization or create one of their own. 

New this year is a redesigned Sun Devil Sync where students can find clubs, organizations and student events, and it allows students to track their involvement.

MORE: New students get schooled in spirit at Sun Devil Welcome

Top photo by Marcus Chormicle/ASU Now

Gain insights from top leaders into successful business strategies

The Economic Club of Phoenix, hosted by ASU's W. P. Carey School of Business, announces its 2019–20 speaker lineup


August 19, 2019

The Economic Club of Phoenix speaker series — hosted by Arizona State University's W. P. Carey School of Business — is celebrating its 35th anniversary and has become the preeminent Arizona forum for the exchange of ideas about business and the economy. 

Every year, Phoenix-area audiences are invited to attend the club’s luncheons to hear from some major names in the business world and have a chance to network and engage.   Download Full Image

Senior executives of adidas, PetSmart and Cox are among those slated to speak during the new Economic Club of Phoenix season. 

“It’s an honor to host leaders from some of the most recognized, influential companies in the world,” said Amy Hillman, dean of the W. P. Carey School of Business. “As a university, we are always excited to bring this event to the local community because it creates such a wonderful avenue for business professionals to connect and learn from one another.”

ECP 2019–20 speaker lineup

Friday, Sept. 27, 2019
First ECP luncheon of the season featuring adidas North America President Zion Armstrong
Scottsdale Resort at McCormick Ranch

Wednesday, Nov. 13, 2019
Spirit of Enterprise Award Luncheon honoring State Forty Eight
Camelback Golf Club

Wednesday, Dec. 11, 2019
Economic Forecast Luncheon featuring:

• Robert J. Barro, Paul M. Warburg Professor of Economics at Harvard University
• Bart Hobijn, applied macroeconomist, W. P. Carey School of Business
• Lee McPheters, research professor of economics, director of the JPMorgan Chase Economic Outlook Center, W. P. Carey School of Business

Phoenix Convention Center, West Ballroom

Thursday, Jan.16, 2020
ECP luncheon featuring PetSmart CEO J.K. Symancyk 
Camelback Golf Club

Thursday, March 12, 2020
ECP luncheon featuring Cox President and CEO Alex Taylor
Camelback Golf Club

Thursday, April 9, 2020
Executive of the Year Award Luncheon honoring: 
The Carlisle Companies President and CEO Christian Koch
JW Marriott Desert Ridge Resort and Spa

Tuesday, May 5, 2020
Annual Economic Outlook Luncheon featuring W. P. Carey economists:

• Dennis Hoffman, director of the L. William Seidman Research Institute
• Lee McPheters, research professor of economics, director of the JPMorgan Chase Economic Outlook Center
• Mark Stapp, executive director, Master of Real Estate Development program

Camelback Golf Club

Each luncheon runs from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. with the exception of December's economic forecast, which is scheduled from 11:15 a.m. to 1:15 p.m. Tickets for nonmembers are available for $85. Funds in excess of the cost of lunch are used to support scholarships and faculty research at the W. P. Carey School of Business. Guests are subject to change.

For more information about the club or to reserve seats, visit econclubphx.org or call 480-727-0596. Journalists interested in covering an event are asked to RSVP in advance.

Shay Moser

Managing Editor, W. P. Carey School of Business

480-965-3963

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