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ASU announces $1.5 billion comprehensive campaign

Campaign ASU 2020 aims to educate community about value of private support.
Wide-ranging comprehensive campaign is about gifts both large and small.
55,600 students have already benefited from scholarships during the campaign.
January 26, 2017

Funds raised in Campaign ASU 2020 to fuel discovery, champion student success and enrich community, among other initiatives

Editor's note: This story is being highlighted in ASU Now's year in review. To read more top stories from 2017, click here.

Developing an Ebola treatment. Caring for a city’s homeless population. Opening pathways to higher education through scholarships.

Such accomplishments take intelligence, compassion — and generosity. To make possible more such life-changing actions, Arizona State University is embarking on a comprehensive campaign to raise at least $1.5 billion to accelerate its mission.

Campaign ASU 2020 is a strategic effort that will focus the entire university’s development energies on one goal — to permanently raise the long-term fundraising capacity of the university. The donations will fund scholarships, faculty research, labs, projects to ensure that students succeed to graduation, arts initiatives and ventures in the community.

ASU President Michael M. Crow said the campaign comes at a pivotal time when the university is reflecting on its successes and building on that momentum.

“Campaign ASU 2020 is our moment in time to say, ‘Yes, we’ve been able to do that. Look at who we are.’ It’s not just the faculty and it’s not just the students and it’s not just the staff. It’s the hundreds of thousands of people and the thousands of organizations that are behind us to move this university forward,” he said.

The campaign has been in a “quiet” phase since 2010 — with $1 billion already raised through donations by corporations, organizations and, especially, individuals — 260,000 individuals have contributed so far, and 55,600 students have benefited from scholarships during the campaign.

Campaign ASU 2020 officially kicked off Thursday night at a gathering of university leaders and supporters. The focus of the night — and the message of the philanthropic effort — is how the work of ASU touches individuals, both on campus and in the community.

Megan Phillips, a global health major at ASU, has walked the streets of Phoenix with her fellow students to care for homeless people. She said her work at a downtown shelter and at the Student Health Outreach for Wellness clinic provides hope and dignity to homeless people.

“But it also provides students like me the chance to broaden their perspectives and serve the community in a very real way,” said Phillips, who is now the director of programs for the student-run clinic. The clinic is in the midst of raising $5,000 to help further its programs. Read more here.

Professor Charles Arntzen, who has saved lives with the Ebola treatment he developed at ASU, said the private funding he received allowed him to try something new and develop it into the leading therapeutic for Ebola.

“I can’t tell you how wonderful it feels to be a scientist who started with a crazy idea and ended up seeing that our product saved lives in Africa,” said Arntzen, who is a Regent’s Professor and holds the Florence Ely NelsonThe Florence Ely Nelson Presidential Chair in Plant Biology was created by created by an endowment from Florence Nelson, who, Arntzen said, "gave me the freedom to explore blue-sky ideas that would typically be considered too risky for conventional grant programs. Florence’s visionary investment ultimately led the way to our discovery of ZMapp, today’s most promising drug treatment for people infected with Ebola." Presidential Chair in Plant Biology.

Crow said that ASU produces change at a huge scale, but it starts with individuals.

“It’s these people who are going to go out and produce these new ideas, produce the changes across the entire spectrum of society,” he said.

ASU must pursue larger, more important goals, Crow said, and become the model for future of higher education.

“This campaign will allow us to build on the momentum of all that we have established thus far and solidify our position as the first institution to successfully blend this level of academic excellence and egalitarian access,” he said.

A history of philanthropy

The university’s very beginning was because of a gift. Donor Craig Weatherup explained that in 1885, local butcher shop owners George and Martha Wilson gave 15 acres of pastureland to build the Territorial Normal School. He noted that two previous fundraising campaigns, in the 1980s and the 1990s, both exceeded their targetsIn the 1980s, the Centennial Campaign set a goal of $75 million and raised $114 million, and in the 1990s, when the campaign set a goal of $300 million and raised $560 million..

“Of course, it’s important to note that we didn’t arrive at this point overnight,” said WeatherupCraig Weatherup is an honorary co-chair of ASU’s President’s Club., former founding chairman and CEO of Pepsi Bottling Group Inc. The Weatherup Family Foundation has funded several initiatives, including the Weatherup Center indoor practice facility and training center for the university’s varsity basketball teams.

He noted other significant donors who have transformed ASU, endowing colleges, launching research centers, building facilities and funding student activities such as the Sun Devil Marching Band.

In addition to fundraising, Campaign ASU 2020 is about educating the community to the value of private support while engaging alumni and friends with the university.

The campaign’s goal of at least $1.5 billion will be distributed this way:

  • $441 million to fuel discovery, creativity and innovation, paying for research, labs, equipment, entrepreneurship opportunities and art galleries.
  • $258 million to drive Sun Devil Athletics competitiveness by increasing scholarships and academic support, adding sports and an Olympic Village on the east side of Rural Road that will include tennis, softball, track and field, soccer, lacrosse, wrestling, gymnastics and volleyball facilities, as well as an Olympic Village-style space for student-athletes.
  • $233 million to elevate the academic enterprise by funding endowed professorships, faculty fellowships and artist-in-residence programs.
  • $220 million to ensure student access and excellence, including scholarships based on need and merit, as well as helping students make progress toward graduation.
  • $184 million to champion student success, which funds students’ learning in real-life situations, study abroad and leadership development.
  • $165 million to enrich our communities, enabling ASU students to participate in local projects, performing arts and public television.

Private support is not a replacement for the university’s other sources of revenue, including investments from the state, students, their families, faculty, staff and research grants. Private support provides the margin of excellence that enables the “extras” that shape excellent, meaningful and impactful university and research experiences.

The campaign, which is being guided by the ASU Foundation for a New American University, is emphasizing the importance of small gifts, noting that in one year, more than 100,000 individual donors gave a total of $215 million that affected every college and school at ASU.

Donors can choose where to giveMany donors choose to restrict their gifts to a certain use or distribution schedule, which can include estate gifts and endowments. Accordingly, many funds raised during the campaign will not be available for immediate spending and will not apply to the university’s yearly operations budget., and ASU’s colleges have set priorities. For example, the W. P. Carey School of Business hopes to raise at least $150 million to fund student scholarships, summer programs and research centers, and to endow faculty chairs and professorships, including one named for Loui Olivas, which would be the first chair named for someone of Hispanic descent at any top 30 business school in the U.S.

ASU President Michael Crow at Campaign ASU 2020 kickoff

President Michael Crow speaks at Thursday's official kickoff of Campaign ASU 2020 at Chase Field in Phoenix. Photo by Charlie Leight/ASU Now

Some Campaign ASU 2020 projects would far exceed the boundaries of campus, including creation of “The Culture Lab of the Americas,” a $30 million, 45,000-square-foot building with state-of-the-art classrooms, research labs, event spaces and ASU Art Museum gallery space that will connect artists and designers with practitioners across disciplines. The Culture Lab will be located near the Phoenix Art Museum and Heard Museum and will offer advanced degree programs and research centers through the Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts and the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.

ASU emphasizes projects that cross disciplines, and Lee Hartwell, a Nobel laureate and professor at ASU, spoke about how today’s students will enter a world that’s almost unimaginable now due to rapid technology changes.

“So, we have to do things differently — and we are. I believe that ASU is leading the way,” said Hartwell, who won the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 2001 and is the Virginia G. Piper Chair Virginia G. Piper Chair of Personalized Medicine is funded by a donation by the Virginia G. Piper Charitable Trust.of Personalized Medicine and co-director of the Biodesign Institute's new Center for Sustainable Health.

He has appointments in the colleges of education, biomedical engineering and sustainability, and that gives him the chance to work with diverse colleagues. For example, in the Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College, he is collaborating on a course called Sustainability for Teachers, intended to make the topic dynamic and inspiring.

“We think this is an important first step in educating the next generation on the very real challenges they face,” he said.

Campaign ASU 2020 principals

Campaign ASU 2020 principals (from left) Bill Post, Craig Weatherup, John Graham, Barbara McConnell Barrett and Leo Beus applaud the donations of all individuals and corporations so far; $1 billion has been raised since the campaign's "quiet launch" in 2010. Photo by Charlie Leight/ASU Now

Donor Leo Beus described how moving it was to see the effects of his gift. He and his wife, Annette, established the Beus Family New American University Scholarship to support incoming freshmen or community college transfer students who are members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

The couple then were able to interview the students who received the scholarships.

“We had the experience of looking them in the eyes and telling them not to worry because their college tuition was covered — and we knew our investments changed lives,” said Beus, co-founder of Beus Gilbert PLLC. They also supported the Beus Center for Law and Society, the new downtown Phoenix home of ASU’s Sandra Day O’Connor School of Law. The center was designed to also house the nation’s first teaching law firm, a law library open to the public and a legal triage service to help the public find legal support.

Jackson Dangremond, president of the Undergraduate Student Government on the Downtown campus and a junior majoring in health care innovation, noted the donations that have already been made.

“Every step moves us one step closer to achieving our aspirations and making a difference in countless lives.”

For more about Campaign ASU 2020, visit giveto.asu.edu. Want to learn more about what a comprensive campaign is and why a public university needs private support, read the campaign primer from the experts at the ASU Foundation.

Top photo: Fireworks, singers and band members from the ASU School of Music celebrate at the conclusion of the official launch of Campaign ASU 2020 on Thursday at Chase Field in Phoenix. The goal is to raise at least $1.5 billion by the year 2020, with $1 billion already raised since the campaign's "quiet launch" in 2010. Photo by Charlie Leight/ASU Now

'Nothing' and the universe

Nobel Laureate Frank Wilczek to talk about ‘materiality of a vacuum’ at ASU Origins Project event


January 24, 2017

Arizona State University’s Origins Project is hosting a lecture by Nobel Laureate Frank Wilczek, where he will discuss the “Materiality of a Vacuum: Late Night Thoughts of a Physicist” at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 31, at the Tempe Center for the Arts.

In modern physics, scientists have found that it is fruitful to regard empty space, or a vacuum, as a sort of material, which can have within it exotic properties like superconductivity. Conversely, materials can be viewed from the inside and the vacua of alternative worlds, which often have exotic, mind-expanding properties. These ideas suggest new possibilities for cosmology and bring to life the profound question: What is a universe? Wilczek’s lecture will be followed by a conversation with Lawrence Krauss, director of the Origins Project. Nobel Laureat Frank Wilczek will discuss the role of nothing in our universe in an Origins Project-sponsored lecture on Jan. 31. Photo by Justin Knight Photography Download Full Image

“It is one of the most remarkable aspects of modern physics that the properties of our universe, with 100 billion galaxies each containing 100 billion stars, turns out to crucially depend on the properties of empty space,” said Krauss. “In this sense, ‘everything’ is determined by ‘nothing.’ Understanding how this comes about gives us a unique new perspective on our place in the universe. There are few people more capable of relating these new ideas than Frank Wilczek, who himself played a seminal role in discovering them.”

Wilczek is the Herman Feshbach professor of physics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and he is an Origins Project distinguished professor at ASU. He received the Nobel Prize in physics in 2004 for his work on asymptotic freedom in the theory of strong interaction.

Krauss is an author, professor, physicist and public intellectual. In addition to being director of the Origins Project, Krauss is an ASU professor in the School of Earth and Space Exploration and in the Department of Physics.

Tickets for “Materiality of a Vacuum: Late Night Thoughts of a Physicist” are $7 and $17. ASU students can obtain free tickets (two tickets per student ID to be picked up the venue box office) for the event. A book signing and pizza will follow the event.

The Tempe Center for the Arts box office is located at 700 W. Rio Salado Parkway, or call 480-350-2822.

For more information on Origins events, please go to www.origins.asu.edu or call (480) 965-0053.

Director, Media Relations and Strategic Communications

480-965-4823

ASU recognized by WorldatWork as an employer of choice


January 23, 2017

Arizona State University has earned the WorldatWork 2017 Seal of Distinction. This year, the university was among 160 companies from 35 states, the District of Columbia and four Canadian provinces to be recognized with the 2017 Seal of Distinction.

The award recognizes ASU’s commitment to creating innovative programs that promote a positive work environment. World at Work Seal of Distinction logo Download Full Image

“We are committed to investing in the health and well-being of faculty, staff and students at ASU,” said Jillian McManus, director of organizational health and development. “We strive to create a healthy environment for everyone through a combination of our formal benefits and our partnerships with ASU departments.”

The 2017 Seal of Distinction is awarded every year to companies across North America that set the standard for employee engagement that leads to business success. The overall strength of a company’s total rewards portfolio is evaluated along with the programs, policies and practices reflected in:

• base pay
• bonus programs
• caring for dependents
• culture initiatives and community involvement
• development opportunities
• financial wellness
• health and wellness
• long-term incentives
• pay for time not worked
• performance management
• perquisites
• recognition
• retirement
• short-term incentives
• unpaid time off
• workforce experience
• workplace flexibility

“We congratulate all of the recipients of the 2017 Seal of Distinction. This year, we saw the highest number of applicants since the Seal of Distinction was created,” said Anne C. Ruddy, president and CEO of WorldatWork in a press release. "I’m confident that this means an increasing number of companies are recognizing the importance of a workplace environment that benefits both the employer and employee.”

All 2017 Seal of Distinction companies will be celebrated at the WorldatWork Total Rewards Conference & Exhibition on May 7-10 in Washington, D.C. Find out more at WorldatWork Seal of Distinction.

Christine Rizzi Tobin

Communications specialist, Office of Business and Finance

480-727-5310

Sun Devil Wrestling hosts Illinois


January 23, 2017

Don’t miss your chance to see one of the most anticipated matchups of the season when No. 18 Sun Devil Wrestling hosts two-time NCAA Champion, Isiah Martinez and No. 12 Illinois. The action begins at 3:30 p.m. Jan. 29, inside Wells Fargo Arena.

The Sun Devils, led by freshmen brothers Zahid and Anthony Valencia, will look to add another victory to the team’s impressive 8-2 record in dual-meets on the season. Join the Sun Devils for their second to last home match of the season. Help provide a daunting atmosphere for the Illini by being loud throughout the duration of the match. Make sure to arrive early as the first 500 fans in attendance will receive a black rally pom-pom. Download Full Image

Staff tickets are only $5. Get yours now by purchasing online or by calling 480-965-5812.

Sun Devil Wrestling takes on North Carolina Nov. 20


January 17, 2017

No. 13 Sun Devil Wrestling looks to build on their momentum when they take on No. 19 North Carolina at 7 p.m. Jan. 20.

The Sun Devils enter the match 1-0 in 2017 and 3-1 overall on the season. As one of the nation’s top teams, the Sun Devils currently feature five ranked wrestlers including No. 1 ranked, and still undefeated Zahid Valencia. Don’t miss this marquee matchup on MMA Night that will include special-guest appearances by Sun Devil alumni, including Cain Velasquez. Download Full Image

Tickets for the match are only $5. Grab yours now by purchasing online or by calling 480-965-5812.

Sun Devil Women’s Basketball upcoming games


January 11, 2017

Take a break from your schedule with Sun Devil Women’s Basketball as they take on Washington State at 11 a.m. Jan. 13. It's also Sparky’s Kids to College Field Trip Game, where you might meet future Sun Devil students.

Then the team will close out the weekend on Jan. 15 as they host No. 8 Washington at 6 p.m. It’s Sunday FunDay at Wells Fargo Arena and all kids 12 & younger will receive free admission to the game. Download Full Image

Kids will be able to enjoy arts and crafts, balloon artists on the east concourse of the arena and shoot hoops on the mini baskets. It’s also the annual Green Game and Bring Your Daughter to a Game Day, where the first 1,000 daughters will receive a flower giveaway. Purchase $5 discounted tickets with promo code GREENGAMEASU at promo.sundeviltickets.com.

ASU expands lab coat laundry program


January 11, 2017

Arizona State University provides laboratory coat laundry services to all ASU researchers on every campus. The current program can launder around 2,000 lab coats, about 50 per week, and is free for lab employees. The pilot laundered 500 lab coats since fall 2016. 

The program is more sustainable than disposable lab coats, may make labs more sustainable overall and assists researchers in keeping lab coats safe and sanitary. Environmental Health and Safety recommends faculty, staff, student workers and volunteers launder their coats at least twice a year and more often as necessary. Lab Coats worn by ASU researchers The expanded lab-coat laundry program has cleaned about 500 lab coats since fall 2016 and has the capacity to clean 2,000 coats. Download Full Image

“This program protects researchers and keeps the research in the lab where it belongs,” according to Amanda Hoyt, Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering chemical safety specialist. “Having an effective way to launder lab coats and making it free and convenient to use makes lab coats much safer.”

Most researchers have a lab coat drop-off location near their laboratory, but some locations may mail lab coats for laundering. Learn more about how to participate from the lab coat webpage.

Program development

The program began when EHS Compliance Officers identified that many labs could not find a cost-effective laundry service. Fulton Schools compliance officer Alana LaBelle presented the concept to the EHS Policy Committee in May 2016.

A team of EHS staff, departmental safety compliance officers and representatives from Mail Services and Procurement introduced the concept and recommended the program to university administrators.

Knowledge and Enterprise Development and University Business Services jointly funds this program for the first year.

Read more about the Lab Coat Laundry Service on the EHS webpage. Learn more about the Compliance Officer program.

Peter Northfelt

Editor assistant, Business and Finance Support – Communications

480-727-4059

Changemakers to be honored at ASU MLK Jr. Celebration


January 9, 2017

One ASU student and two influential Arizonans were selected as the 2017 Community Servant-Leadership awardees as a part of Arizona State University's 32nd annual Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration for their influential work in the community.

Amber Poleviyuma and Lattie and Elva Coor will be honored at the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Breakfast Celebration on Jan. 19 at the ASU Polytechnic campus. Lattie and Elva Coor Community Servant-Leadership Awardees Elva and Lattie Coor will be honored at the ASU Martin Luther King Jr. Breakfast Celebration on Jan. 19 for their contributions to the community. Download Full Image

The awardees were selected by the ASU MLK Jr. Committee for their servant leadership, for their philosophy of serving first, then leading as a way of expanding service.

The breakfast will also honor 24 students in grades K-12 who were selected from more than 1,300 entries, as winners of the committee’s s annual statewide children’s essay and drawing contest

Contest participants were required to either create a poster illustrating their definition of leadership through service, or write an essay or poem about an individual who personifies that definition. This year’s theme is "Be the face of change."

Poleviyuma, the Student Servant-Leadership awardee, is a community health student at ASU’s College of Nursing and Health Innovation.

“The teachings of my grandpa and my mom instilled the values that I have that make me want to give back and contribute to the community,” she said.

Inspired by her family, members of the Hopi tribe in northern Arizona’s Moenkopi village, Poleviyuma said she aims to use her research to affect policy. In accordance with the Native American values of community and selflessness, she hopes to make a difference in the community and expand communication and understanding across racial and ethnic barriers.

“Even though we don’t have a lot of money and we’re from a place that doesn’t have a lot of resources, we still find ways to give back to each other,” Poleviyuma said.

Although she is interested in addressing a wide variety of issues including environmental, government and health issues, she said she is especially focused on reducing the number of youth suicides on Native American reservations through culturally relevant preventative programming. In 2014, Poleviyuma worked with the Center for American Indian Resilience to conduct research for the Native American Cancer Prevention project, which explored the experiences of Native American cancer patients with health-care providers. She helped found Native Americans for Academics, Success and Unity, an ASU club meant to help Native American students reach their academic goals while engaging with the community.

“That was a way to help with representation and give Native students here on campus a place to be and ways to give back,” she said.

Poleviyuma also worked with the ASU Tribal Nations Tour to reach out to Native American students throughout the state and inspire these students to pursue a college degree upon completing high school. She said Martin Luther King Jr. stood up for people who couldn’t stand up for themselves, and she hopes to do the same.

Poleviyuma says she leads by example to create greater understanding among different peoples, and in this way, hopes to show that these issues aren’t just Native American issues — they’re shared issues.

Native Arizonans Lattie and Elva Coor, the Community Servant-Leadership awardees, have a rich tradition of giving back to the community in a variety of leadership roles. Lattie F. Coor is President-Emeritus and Ernest W. McFarland Arizona Heritage Chair in Leadership and Public Policy at ASU, and chairman and CEO of the Center for the Future of Arizona.

“All of us have an opportunity to bring attention to these issues and then speak out on them,” he said.

Growing up, Coor lived in a diverse area in Avondale, which inspired him to become a champion for equal access to education, regardless of socioeconomic or racial background. 

“The world as I knew it had this rich array of people. ... A significant number were low-income,” Coor said. “I had the privilege of seeing there, what education could do for their lives.”

Throughout his adult life, Coor worked to make the equal opportunity he envisioned into a reality and has received many awards for his work thus far. For the past 26 years, he has served as a university president, first at the University of Vermont from 1976 to 1989, then at Arizona State University from 1990 to 2002. During his time at ASU, he hoped to make the university’s population reflect the diversity within the community.

“There were major ways to change and shape it for the future, and it was that, above all, being in a university and being able to help it as it grew and developed, is what caused me to devote my whole career to that,” Coor said.

In 2002, he founded the Center for the Future of Arizona, a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization designed to research and act upon issues relating to the state’s economy, quality of life and civic health. One of the organization’s main focuses is education, and includes a program called SpeakOut AZ that was designed to increase civic participation throughout Arizona and include civics curriculum in schools. 

SpeakOut AZ was created by Coor’s wife and co-awardee, Elva Coor, who has held roles in government and political activities at the local, state and national level, as she seeks to increase community participation in government. Elva Coor also founded a business, which she managed for 20 years, and the Arizona chapter of the National Association of Business Women.

In addition to founding the President’s Community Enrichment Programs at ASU, which aims to unite the university with its surrounding community, Elva Coor has also served on boards and volunteered with many organizations. She also co-founded Building Great Communities, and founded an organization meant to increase the graduation rate of African-American students at ASU.

She said her years of working in the political arena, business, academia and nonprofits led her to value a well-informed and engaged electorate. 

“The success of our great country depends upon providing every child with a good start and great education that prepares them for college, careers and their lives,” Coor said. “Our political system is dependent upon that kind of success, and is dependent upon each of us being involved to help millions of people emerge from poverty.”

For more information about the 2017 MLK Jr. Committee and events celebrating Dr. King’s legacy, go to asu.edu/mlk.

Marketing and Communications Assistant, ASU Gammage

480-965-3462

ASU Gammage completes fundraising for Elevate and Alleviate Campaign


January 6, 2017

ASU Gammage, its donors and the community helped raise more than $9 million during the Elevate & Alleviate Campaign as part of the 50th Anniversary Golden Gammage Initiative, to sustain the performing arts center for future generations and make improvements to enhance patrons’ show experience.

Renovations include expanding the venue’s restroom facilities, improving accessibility by building elevators and revamping the theater’s sound system. ASU Gammage auditorium renovations ASU Gammage, its donors and the community raised more than $9 million to help renovate the auditorium and ensure its use by future generations. Download Full Image

Construction on the new restrooms and elevators began over the summer and is set to be completed in March 2017.

The campaign began in March 2015 with a $3 million lead gift from The Kemper & Ethel Marley Foundation, which was matched by Arizona State University.

Fundraising capped off in December 2016 with an additional personal gift from ASU Gammage 50th Anniversary Board members and local philanthropists Laurie and Chuck Goldstein. Laurie is also an ASU trustee.

Other major gift donors include Susan and William Ahearn, Pat Langlin-Brazil and George Brazil Plumbing & Electrical and the Margaret T. Morris Foundation.

Rendering of upgraded restrooms at ASU Gammage

ASU Gammage Elevate and Alleviate contributions helped fund the renovation and expansion of the venue's restrooms, which are expected to be completed in March.

More than 1,500 donors contributed to the project, including significant investments from ASU Gammage as a result of the success of its last two seasons.

“We are grateful to all of the supporters who have shared our vision on this project,” said Colleen Jennings-Roggensack, executive director for ASU Gammage and associate vice president cultural affairs for ASU. “Based on the extraordinary support and ticket sales the last few years, we’re able to turn this into a reality.”

Since 2006, ASU Gammage has created more than $500 million of economic impact for Arizona with its Broadway series, and provided nearly 5 million people with world-class arts experiences.

What started as former ASU President Grady Gammage’s idea to create a distinct university auditorium, is now a world-class presenting organization and a vital cultural and economic engine for Arizona.

The 50th Anniversary Leadership Board includes co-chairs Leslie and Jeff Rich, co-chair Mary Way, William Ahearn, Felice Appell, JO Finks, Grady Gammage Jr., Laurie and Chuck Goldstein, Pat Langlin-Brazil, Albert Leffler, Michael Manning, Sarah Nolan, Bill Way and the late Jerry Appell.

Marketing and Communications Assistant, ASU Gammage

480-965-3462

Start the new year off with Sun Devil Wrestling


January 3, 2017

The Sun Devil wrestling team returns to action this Sunday at 2 p.m., Jan. 8, when they face Cal Poly for their first match of 2017. Fans are asked to be loud and wear gold to help GOLDOUT Wells Fargo Arena. Tickets for the match are only $5 if you buy in advance.

The Sun Devils, led by head coach Zeke Jones, are currently ranked No. 19 in the country and surging forward, due in large part to Zahid Valencia and Anthony Valencia — two of the most impressive freshmen in the country. Be the home-mat advantage for the Sun Devils in this Pac-12 matchup. Get your tickets online or by calling 480-965-5812. Download Full Image

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