ASU School of Film, Dance and Theatre announces 2017-2018 season


August 7, 2017

The ASU School of Film, Dance and Theatre’s upcoming season offers something for everyone, from dance concerts and film screenings to cutting-edge theatre and collaborative productions between different art forms. 

A highlight of this year’s season is “Six Stories Tall” — a joint theater and dance production. ASU School of Film, Dance and Theatre 2017-18 Season Download Full Image

“One of the goals of this collaboration is to explore interdisciplinary forms that move beyond traditional approaches to art making,” said Mary Fitzgerald, assistant director of dance in the School of Film, Dance and Theatre.

“Six Stories Tall” is a vibrant collection of hip-hop fairy tales that celebrates urban culture through dance, music and storytelling.

“The innovative practices that have emerged from urban dance (movement and spoken word) can take the production in entirely new directions, perhaps helping to blur the boundaries between the disciplines of dance and theatre,” Fitzgerald said.

Guests interested in dance also have the chance to see several dance concerts this season, including Fall Forward!, a dance showcase featuring new works that explore an exciting range of aesthetics, movement styles and new media platforms that redefine dance and live performance. Emerging Artists and Transition Projects put a spotlight on student work, and SpringDanceFest highlights some of the best pieces from the year.

Two theatre productions in the fall, Jennifer Haley’s “The Nether” and Herberger Institute Professor Michael Rohd’s “The Compass,” tackle sci-fi stories set in the near future. “The Compass” puts a teenager in serious trouble after she consults a decision-making app that tells users what they would do in any situation. The audience acts as the jury in this inventive work that promises a different ending each night.

The last two theatre productions of the season are Pulitzer Prize-winning “The Flick” and “By the Way, Meet Vera Stark,” both set within the film industry. The first follows the lives of three employees at an old movie theatre, and the second tells the story of an African American actress in 1930s Hollywood.

Film lovers should also check out the two Senior Film Showcases, one at the end of each semester. Audiences have the opportunity to screen a series of films selected by ASU film faculty and industry professionals. Produced by graduating student filmmakers, these works include short films and documentaries as well as cinematography and editing reels.

Purchase tickets at filmdancetheatre.asu.edu/events. In addition to these events, the School of Film, Dance and Theatre also presents a range of other performances and events, from student productions and faculty work to workshops and performances by guest artists. Some of those include the Performance in the Borderlands series, Sol Motion series, Scholarship Series and FilmSpark events. Visit filmdancetheatre.asu.edu for more information.

Fall 2017 schedule

Fall Forward!
7:30 p.m. Sept. 15–16; 2 p.m. Sept. 17
Paul V. Galvin Playhouse 
Fall Forward!, the kick-off event of the School of Film, Dance and Theatre’s 2017-2018 season, features new works created by ASU faculty and guests. Artists explore an exciting range of aesthetics, movement styles and new media platforms that redefine dance and live performance.

The Nether
Written by Jennifer Haley
Directed by William Partlan
7:30 p.m. Oct. 13–14, 19–21; 2 p.m. Oct. 15, 22
Lyceum Theatre
Welcome to the Nether — a network of virtual reality realms. Plug in. Choose an identity. Indulge your every whim. In this near-future, sci-fi thriller, a young detective faces off against the creator of a virtual world that offers a disturbing brand of entertainment. “The Nether” is a tense interrogation of the darkest corners of the human imagination. (Contains unsettling content and mature themes.)

The Compass
Written and Directed by Michael Rohd
7:30 p.m. Nov. 11, 16–18; 2 p.m. Nov. 12, 19 
Paul V. Galvin Playhouse
A teenager finds herself in serious trouble after she consults a decision-making app that tells users what they would do in any situation. Should she be held responsible? Did the app make her do it? Do her motivations matter? You’re the jury in this inventive, near-future work of science fiction.

Emerging Artists I
7:30 p.m. Nov. 17–18; 2 p.m. Nov. 19
Margaret Gisolo Dance Studio Theatre
Featuring Michelle Marji and Rebecca Witt
The Emerging Artists series presents thesis and capstone projects created by MFA and BFA candidates in dance. Students investigate personal stories and thought-provoking issues through live performance, film and interactive media.  

Fall Senior Film Showcase
7 p.m. Dec. 1
Paul V. Galvin Playhouse
Film faculty and industry professionals present a curated series of films produced by graduating student filmmakers. The culmination of more than a year’s work, these works include short films and documentaries as well as cinematography and editing reels.

Spring 2018 schedule

Transition Projects I
7:30 p.m. Jan. 26–27; 2 p.m. Jan. 28
Margaret Gisolo Dance Studio Theatre
BFA candidates present an eclectic evening of work, showcasing the culmination of their undergraduate artistic experiences. Spanning the aesthetics of postmodern, urban and hybrid dance styles, this show features original pieces made for the stage, alternative spaces and film. 

Six Stories Tall
Written by Marco Ramirez
Directed by Chris Weise
Choreographed by Melissa Britt
7:30 p.m. Feb. 9–10, 15–17; 2 p.m. Feb. 11, 18
Paul V. Galvin Playhouse
“Six Stories Tall” is a vibrant collection of hip-hop fairy tales, from mermaids and monsters to Batman and a world painted purple. This production celebrates urban culture through dance, music and storytelling.

The Flick
Written by Annie Baker
7:30 p.m. Feb. 16–17, 22–24; 2 p.m. Feb. 18, 25
Nelson Fine Arts Center 133
Winner of the 2014 Pulitzer Prize for Drama, “The Flick” peers behind the scenes of a rundown Massachusetts movie theatre where three employees struggle with friendship, heartbreak and betrayal. “The Flickis a hilarious and moving parable for our times.

By the Way, Meet Vera Stark
Written by Lynn Nottage
7:30 p.m. April 13–14, 19–21; 2 p.m. April 15, 22
Lyceum Theatre
Vera Stark, an African-American maid and aspiring actress in 1930s Hollywood, sets out to land a role in a southern epic alongside her white starlet employer. Several years and several films later, Stark disappears, leaving scholars to debate her legacy, mine old interview footage for clues and examine her tangled relationships behind-the-scenes of the film that made her famous. Discover Stark’s story in this comedy that takes an irreverent look at race in Hollywood.

SpringDanceFest
7:30 p.m. April 20–21; 2 p.m. April 22
Paul V. Galvin Playhouse
SpringDanceFest showcases the breadth of creativity in the dance program, featuring student choreographers and performers in some of the most innovative work of the 2017-2018 season. The concert also includes pieces created by faculty, visiting artists and alumni.

Spring Senior Film Showcase
7 p.m., April 27
Paul V. Galvin Playhouse
Film faculty and industry professionals present a curated series of films produced by graduating student filmmakers. The culmination of more than a year’s work, these works include short films and documentaries as well as cinematography and editing reels. 

Sarah A. McCarty

Marketing and communications coordinator, Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts

480-727-4433

ASU announces international tech leader as new chief information officer


August 7, 2017

Arizona State University has selected Lev Gonick, an internationally recognized leader in innovative technology strategies and solutions, to serve as chief information officer (CIO) starting Nov. 1.

Gonick will lead the University Technology Office (UTO), responsible for providing technology services and support to ASU’s more than 72,000 on-campus students, 28,000 online students and 15,000 faculty and staff. Gonick will report to Mark Searle, executive vice president and university provost; and Morgan R. Olsen, executive vice president, treasurer and chief financial officer. He will also hold the rank of professor of practice. Gonick will replace current CIO Gordon Wishon, who retires at the end of the year. man speaking at podium Lev Gonick will serve as ASU's chief information officer starting Nov. 1. Download Full Image

“Under Gordon’s exceptional leadership for the past seven years, ASU’s technology office has met the challenges of a growing, globally connected university,” Searle said. “Lev’s vision, transformational leadership style and track record of innovation will support the university in further realizing the potential of technology to empower the ASU community.”

A model for the New American University, ASU relies on its world-class University Technology Office to ensure students and staff have the resources they need to pursue academic excellence in the face of unprecedented technological advancements. The UTO is the hub for ASU’s “smart campus” initiative, which is leveraging Internet of Things technology, big data and analytics to provide students with a 21st-century higher-education experience.

Gonick will serve in a consulting role prior to starting in his official capacity. Presently, he concurrently serves as chief executive officer of DigitalC, a nonprofit that catalyzes innovative technology for community impact; and OneCommunity, an award-winning organization he co-founded that enables innovation, collaboration and productivity through next-generation broadband networks.

“We are delighted to welcome Lev to ASU,” said Olsen. “Throughout his professional career he has demonstrated a commitment to innovation, creativity and collaboration that aligns with the university’s efforts to redefine the landscape of public higher education.”

From 2001 to 2013, Gonick was chief information officer at Case Western Reserve University, where he and his colleagues were internationally recognized for technology innovations in community engagement, learning spaces, next-generation network projects and organizational development.

Inside Business magazine named Gonick to its Power 100 list in 2015, and Government Technology recognized him as one of the "Top 25 Doers, Dreamers & Drivers in Public-Sector Innovation" in 2011. That same year, Crain's Cleveland Business named Gonick one of its "10 Difference Makers" in northeast Ohio and Broadband Properties honored him with a Cornerstone Award for "using fiber to build an inclusive society and empower individuals." In 2010, he was honored as "Visionary of the Year" by the National Association of Telecommunications Officers and Advisors. Gonick has been recognized by ComputerWorld as a Premier 100 IT leader and by CIO Magazine with a CIO 100 Award.

A frequent international speaker and consultant, Gonick serves on the boards of Luminance, Civitas Learning, DigitalC, Coalition for Local Internet Choice, Jewish Family Services Association, Macromedia University, US Ignite, Groundworks Dance Company, Northeast Ohio Sustainable Community Consortium, OneCommunity and New Media Consortium.

“I have long been inspired by the vision and mission of ASU,” Gonick said. “I have the greatest respect for the senior administration and the many faculty and staff I have met on campus. I am genuinely thrilled to join ASU and help chart the ways in which the professional technology community can contribute to the advancement of this innovative university.”

Gonick holds a bachelor’s degree in political science from Ohio State University, a master’s degree in political science from Binghamton University and a doctorate in political science from York University.

Sun Devil achievers sought for 3 upcoming Alumni Association award events


August 2, 2017

Arizona State University’s alumni base, now 496,000 strong, is filled with Sun Devils who have used their ASU education to help others, enrich the community and make the world a better place. The community is officially invited to help the ASU Alumni Association locate candidates for three upcoming award programs, which will honor graduates of the institution who have made significant contributions in a variety of areas of achievement.

Nominees are currently being sought for the following awards: Jack Furst accepts the Philanthropist of the Year honor at the 2017 Founders' Day Awards. Download Full Image

Homecoming Awards

The association presents two awards at Homecoming — the Alumni Service Award, which recognizes distinguished, exemplary and extraordinary service to ASU and the Alumni Association by an alumnus; and the Alumni Appreciation Award, which is presented to a community member who is not a graduate of ASU for contributions that have enhanced the stature and success of ASU and the Alumni Association.

This year, the awards will be presented at halftime of the ASU-USC Homecoming game on Oct 28.

Founders’ Day Awards

The Alumni Association's Founders' Day Awards Dinner is one of the organization's signature events. Honorees at this event include faculty, staff, alumni and philanthropists whose contributions to the university and the community at large exemplify the pioneering spirit of the founders of the institution.

Founders’ Day will be held on March 21, 2018.

Sun Devil 100 Awards

This event highlights ASU’s incredible history of entrepreneurial leadership and celebrates the achievements of Sun Devil-owned and Sun Devil-led businesses across the country.

The next Sun Devil 100 ceremony is scheduled for April 25, 2018.

The deadline for nominations for all three award programs is 5 p.m. Sept. 15.

For additional information on these awards, to make a nomination, as well as learn about the Alumni Association’s other community awards, visit https://alumni.asu.edu/services/community-awards.

Orange Mall revamp marks new era in ASU campus mall renovations


August 1, 2017

Orange Mall renovations mark a sustained improvement in the area around the Memorial Union on Arizona State University's Tempe campus and will be complete with the new Student Pavilion, opening in fall 2017.

“More space for the community and the incorporation of nature benefits everyone in large and small ways," said Byron Sampson, associate director of the Office of the University Architect. "ASU’s mission is to leverage our place, and a transformation of this area is crucial to our ability to do so." Artist rendering of Orange Mall extension The current asphalt cul-de-sac and unshaded walkways in front of the pavilion create a heat island that will be mitigated by new bioswales along the length of Orange Mall. Bioswales capture and filter storm water runoff, pavilion condensate and roof drainage. Artist rendering by Colwell Shelor Landscape Architecture Download Full Image

The project extends the pavilion's indoor areas outside and increases pedestrian space. It features:

• electrical charging outlets
• fixed benches and lounge chairs
• landfill-recycle bin duos
• movable tables and chairs
• new benches

The current asphalt cul-de-sac and unshaded walkways in front of the pavilion create a heat island that will be mitigated by new bioswales along the length of Orange Mall. Bioswales capture and filter storm water runoff, pavilion condensate and roof drainage.

The reclaimed water irrigates the landscape that will feature 23 new date palms. The dates produced by the palms in the Palm Court will be collected as part of the annual ASU Campus Harvest.

The first Certified Sustainable Sites project at ASU follows the Tempe Campus Hardscape Master Plan. Collaboration with student groups, staff and consultants contributed to the use of locally sourced elements:

• soil, compost, mulch and rock from within 50 miles
• plants from within 250 miles
• other construction materials from within 500 miles

The revamp also extends the current Walk-Only Zone and increases the amount of pedestrian-centric space. New bicycle spaces will be integrated with the MU bike valet, and more bike parking will be added next to the new Orange Mall.

ASU wins Best Game Day Technology Experience honor


July 25, 2017

The National Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics (NACDA) and CDW-G, a leading provider of technology solutions to education, government and health care, have announced Arizona State University as the winner of the inaugural Best Game Day Technology Experience Award. ASU was chosen from a pool of three finalists and received the award for its “Smart Campus” initiative. 

The Best Game Day Technology Experience Award will be presented by NACDA and CDW-G this fall, at an on-campus event hosted by ASU. Smart Stadium experience Download Full Image

“We are humbled to receive this award from NACDA and CDW-G,” said Ray Anderson, vice president for university athletics. “The work being done on our Smart Stadium project is unparalleled and a testament to the investment our university leadership has made in ensuring Sun Devil Nation has an experience to match their passion. We are extremely fortunate to partner with our first-class University Technology Office on this project, and we look forward to continuing to test new technologies as we not only reinvent Sun Devil Stadium, but find new ways to interact with our fans and enhance their experiences.”

The award was designed to recognize NACDA member institutions in Division I, honoring athletics directors and their universities highlighting the ways technology plays a role in the fan experience. A five-person committee consisting of athletics directors across the country and representatives from CDW-G and NACDA aided in selecting ASU as this year's award winner.

ASU will receive a trophy and $25,000 in Microsoft and Cisco technology products and services from CDW-G.

“Arizona State University’s ‘Smart Campus’ initiative is aptly named. With cutting-edge IoT (Internet of Things) technologies in place, it effectively uses those devices and data to improve the stadium experience,” said Nicci Fagan, director of area sales for CDW-G. “We are proud to celebrate ASU’s innovation and excellence with the first annual Best Game Day Technology Experience Award.”

“Arizona State is setting a new standard for game-day technology on campus,” said NACDA Executive Director Bob Vecchione. “It is remarkable to witness the time, effort and creativity that goes into projects like ASU’s Smart Campus initiative. Congratulations to the Sun Devils athletics department for their groundbreaking efforts in enhancing the game day experience for fans and the campus community.”

For the 2016-17 Sun Devil Football season, Arizona State University (ASU) began its “Smart Campus” initiative, implementing Internet of Things technologies to enrich the game-day experience. ASU utilized the new technologies to improve operational insights for facilities, create a unique suite experience for stakeholders, and enhance the game experience for fans. Its primary focuses were Smart Parking, a Smart Noise Meter and a Smart Suite, all of which utilized an inter-networking of devices to collect and exchange data in new and meaningful ways.

 
image title

ASU a 'best buy,' according to 2018 Fiske Guide to Colleges

Fiske guide names ASU a best buy for academics, value.
July 17, 2017

Guide annually ranks schools with the best combination of academic excellence and value for the cost of tuition

Students seeking a quality education at a reasonable price can look to Arizona State University as a "best buy," according to Fiske Guide to Colleges 2018.

The guide, which annually ranks schools with the best combination of academic excellence and value for the cost of tuition, included ASU on its list of only 20 public universities designated this year. 

ASU shared the distinction with the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the University of Maryland, the University of Florida and the University of Washington, among others. It was the only Arizona school on the list.

The Fiske guide describes ASU as a university “where ‘massive innovation’ is the norm and where an interdisciplinary culture is seen as the best means of developing ‘world-changing ideas.’ ASU’s stated goal is to serve any Arizona student qualified for college-level work and, in the process, it has become a national model of how to deal with the emerging demographics of U.S. higher education.”

Fiske reports ASU’s tuition for in-state students at around $11,000. In fact, very few resident students pay that amount: with gift aid and scholarships, the average Arizonan pays $1,800 in net tuition per school year.

RELATED: ASU tuition estimator

ASU’s commitment to access and affordability has created an influx of students from a diverse socioeconomic range, expanding ASU’s reach beyond many similar schools.

And it’s not just Arizona students benefiting from the high-value proposition presented by ASU.

Students from all states have access to the world-class education of the No. 1 most innovative university in the country, according to U.S. News and World Report, for a reasonable cost. 

“The scholarship I got from ASU made my out-of-state tuition about equivalent to what it would have cost in California to go to school,” said Lauren Gooch, a senior studying marketing. “Also, being able to graduate in four years was important to me — ASU guaranteed that, while the California schools I was considering could not.”

The Fiske guide is not the only ranking in which ASU excels. In addition to the No. 1 in innovation ranking — ahead of No. 2 Stanford and No. 3 MIT — the university ranks in the top 10 for graduate employability ahead of MIT, Columbia and UCLA, according to Times Higher Education. 

ASU is the No. 1 public university in the U.S. as chosen by international students according to the Institute of International Education.

And it’s home to a top 25 law school, a top 25 graduate business school and a top 20 fine arts school in the country, according to U.S. News and World Report.

And like the Fiske “best buy,” it has been designated a “Best College Value” by Kiplinger’s.

 
image title

Gretchen Buhlig appointed to ASU Foundation’s top post

July 5, 2017

With 15 years in leadership roles supporting ASU, longtime fundraiser oversaw the launch of $1.5 billion Campaign ASU 2020

The Arizona State University Foundation for a New American University announced today that longtime fundraiser Gretchen Buhlig has been named chief executive officer of the organization, effective July 1.

Buhlig served as chief operating officer and managing director of the ASU Foundation, a nonprofit organization that raises and invests private support to advance the mission of its affiliated university. She will continue to work closely with Rick Shangraw, CEO of the parent organization to the ASU Foundation, ASU Enterprise Partners, and other distinct private nonprofit resource-raising companies formerly housed within it.

Buhlig brings two decades of donor cultivation and stewardship experience to the position, including close relationships built over her 15 years in leadership roles supporting ASU.

“Gretchen deeply understands the unique value of this university and how meaningful it is when a donor is able to connect with a student, researcher or program to support what he or she loves,” ASU President Michael M. Crow said. “We’re grateful for her leadership and for the contributions the ASU Foundation makes to the progress of Arizona State.”

Under the guidance of Shangraw and Buhlig, the ASU Foundation broke fundraising records for the past three years and expanded givers to include more than 100,000 individual, corporate and foundation donors.

In January 2017, they oversaw the launch of Campaign ASU 2020, ASU’s first comprehensive fundraising effort during Crow’s tenure. At the time of the campaign’s public unveiling, it had secured two-thirds of its goal to raise at least $1.5 billion by 2020.

Buhlig is credited with shaping the ASU Foundation’s 2025 Strategic Plan alongside representatives from across the development staff. She increased collaboration amongst deans and fundraising volunteers, and led growth of the ASU Foundation’s engagement programs, including President’s Club and Women & Philanthropy, which she helped found.

“Gretchen’s insight, warmth and deep commitment to increasing student access and excellence at ASU and across the community is evident in all she does,” said William Post, chairman of the ASU Foundation Board of Directors and former chairman and CEO of Pinnacle West Capital Corporation. “We are better for it. ASU is better for it. Phoenix is better for it. The influence of her work and the work of ASU’s generous donors goes far beyond that.”

“By building on years of work by our development staff and continuing the momentum of the newly launched Campaign ASU 2020, it is a more exciting time than ever to accelerate our efforts to foster a culture of philanthropy at the university,” Shangraw said.

Buhlig previously served as associate vice president of institutional advancement for A.T. Still University. She is a graduate of Augustana College and Walden University.

“It is my honor to lead an outstanding team of passionate fundraisers who are eager to connect with our supporters in the community,” Buhlig said. “In the spirit of the New American University, we are implementing new ideas from within an atmosphere of invention to create and sustain the resources that enable ASU’s research, teaching and learning. I look forward to building on our tremendous energy to continue strengthening that important work.”

Beth Giudicessi

480-727-7402

 
image title

ASU's Biodesign C marks milestone with topping-out celebration

June 28, 2017

Research building will house a key drug discovery and bioenergy research tool: The world’s first compact free-electron X-ray laser

Arizona State University celebrated a major research building construction milestone Wednesday morning with the topping out of the $120 million Biodesign Institute C Research Building.

The ceremony officially commemorated the completion of the main structural work and gave the community a preview of future benefits when the third building in the ASU Biodesign Institute’s master-planned, 14-acre complex located on the main campus in Tempe, Arizona, is completed in the summer of 2018.

 Video by Grace Clark/ASU

Joshua LaBaer, Biodesign’s executive director and a renowned cancer researcher, sees the addition of this new space as concrete evidence of ASU’s significant commitment to leading the field with discoveries that keep people and the planet healthy.

“Powered by intellect, energy and innovation, our researchers believe they can accomplish what others often find impossible,” said LaBaer. “With the addition of Biodesign C, we will soon have nearly 700 scientists of all kinds — biologists, engineers, chemists, physicists, mathematicians, computer technologists — and students working together to find creative and clean solutions for energy, air and water. We will invent new diagnostics and treatments that are accessible and affordable, and in some cases, we expect to be able to halt disease before it even begins.”

After a welcome address from Tamara Deuser, acting chief operating officer for the Biodesign Institute and associate vice president of research operations at ASU's Knowledge Enterprise Development (KED), the final beam was hoisted aloft — a 21-foot-long, quarter-ton metal beam placed by workers for McCarthy Construction, which oversees the construction of the nearly 200,0000-square-foot building. Attached to the beam were an American flag, Biodesign banner and a pine tree, traditional emblems of topping-out ceremonies for steel-constructed buildings.

“Topping out marks a significant milestone in the construction process, signaling the final beam placement of a new structure,” said Justin Kelton, president of McCarthy Building Companies’ Southwest division. “For a research facility of world-class caliber like Biodesign Institute C represents, topping out is even more meaningful because it brings with it significant hope for our future and the promise of new discoveries and innovations.”

Biodesign Institute C will house a key drug discovery and bioenergy research tool — the world’s first compact free-electron X-ray laser — a super X-ray that will peer deep inside proteins to better understand both the action of molecules critical to cancer and other devastating diseases and better understand how plants convert sunlight into renewable energy. Scientists of varying disciplines will be in the lab’s “neighborhoods,” a layout of close proximity that encourages collaboration. The design is modeled after state-of-the-art research complexes like the J. Craig Venter Institute in La Jolla, California, which was also built by McCarthy.

Major research highlights include the following:

  • A custom-designed vault in the basement will house the world’s first compact X-ray free-electron laser, attracting top-line researchers nationwide. This project miniaturizes existing technology that stretches out about kilometers long and is currently only available in California, Japan and Korea. Scientific “gridlock” is delaying the discovery of new, more effective drugs and clean energy. Once ASU has successfully completed this project, the technology can be made available to research centers throughout the world.

  • Led by Eric Reiman, the new ASU-Banner Neurodegenerative Disease Research Center is expected to be one of the world’s largest basic science centers for the study of Alzheimer’s and other neurodegenerative diseases. The team is working to develop clinical and research programs with Banner Health.

  • This new building and its inhabitants will drive ASU’s collaborative spirit of innovation far into the future, building on ASU’s reputation of No. 1 in innovation in the nation. Building C is designed to be a workplace that drives cooperation and collaboration between researchers from different fields — to accelerate our ability to drive new solutions into practice, called use-inspired research. Talented researchers from the Biodesign Institute, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering will eventually house 80 lead researchers and 300 support staff, bringing Biodesign’s total workforce to 700 strong.

  • The cost of the building is $120 million. It is funded by “green bonds” that allows investors to invest directly in projects identified as promoting environmental sustainability on ASU campuses.

  • At full capacity, Biodesign C is expected to increase ASU’s annual research expenditures by an estimated $60 million, supporting ASU’s goal of increasing research revenue to $850 million by 2025 and contributing an estimated $750 million to the Phoenix metro area in the coming decade.

  • Building C is 189,000 square feet, 60,000 of which is flexible lab space (bringing the total size of all three Biodesign buildings to 535,000 square feet).

  • Additionally, following ASU’s green building standards, Biodesign Institute C has been designed to the highest levels of sustainability and includes an innovative HVAC system to limit its energy and environmental footprint.

The new research facility includes five stories, a mechanical penthouse, plus a basement that connects with the ASU Biodesign Institute B building and will house the X-ray laser facility. The building’s adaptable design will accommodate multiple types of scientific research, including chemistry, biological sciences and engineering research. The building, composed mostly of wet laboratories and offices, also includes high-bay spaces.

The project team, which includes architects Zimmer Gunsul Frasca and BWS Architects in addition to general contractor McCarthy Building Companies, is employing the latest in virtual-reality technology and modeling to successfully execute this project for fast-track completion in spring 2018.

Some of the design and construction solutions implemented to date include:

  • Building a small exterior mockup on site using building materials to test for any deficiencies before actual construction. This mockup was put through extreme worst-case scenarios of wind, water and smoke tests to ensure energy efficiency.

  • Creating an interior lab space mockup for researchers to understand the placement of important features like sinks, gas outlets, counter heights, etc.

  • Developing an extensive pour process for the 19 white concrete columns, ensuring consistent color, sharp edges, smooth surface and precise angles to fulfill the design goal of support while also serving as a building showpiece.

  • Degaussing (the process of decreasing or eliminating a remnant magnetic field) all rebar in linear accelerator and laser labs, which saved approximately $1 million.

The targeted official opening date of Biodesign C is June 2018.

Top photo by Veronica Gomez

Joe Caspermeyer

Manager (natural sciences) , Media Relations & Strategic Communications

480-727-4858

ASU Library announces newly integrated system


June 26, 2017

In an effort to better connect the ASU community to the information resources and digital tools they need, ASU Library is implementing a newly integrated library service platform (LSP) that will enhance and expand library services and operational workflows university-wide.

Supporting ASU’s commitment to innovation and accessibility, the new system will enable ASU Library to continuously refresh and unveil new digital tools that will allow students and faculty to search, browse, share and customize materials in increasingly robust and intuitive ways.   Download Full Image

Additionally, the platform will support broader integration of information resources through its alignment with the University of Arizona (UA) and Northern Arizona University (NAU), part of a tri-university LSP collaboration to ensure greater fiscal responsibility and operational efficiency.

Implementation of the new platform is currently underway at ASU and NAU, and UA plans to implement the new system in July 2018.

Beginning June 27, the ASU community can expect to see a series of updates, as part of a phased system rollout, to improve the user experience of online services such as the library catalog and Blackboard.

The platform was selected following an extensive evaluation process that sought the best available technology and library management solution for supporting university research and knowledge-building needs.

Britt Lewis

Communications Specialist, ASU Library

ASU, city of Phoenix launch new innovation incubator program

RISN Incubator to help develop a robust circular economy using waste, other resources for Arizona, beyond


June 14, 2017

Arizona State University, twice named the most innovative school in the nation by US News and World Report, in collaboration with the city of Phoenix, named the Top Performing City overall by Governing and Living Cities, announce a call for innovators and entrepreneurs to participate in the RISN Incubator, a diverse solutions business development and accelerator program.

Selected ventures that focus on waste diversion and improvements in processing or utilization of waste as a raw material for new products or energy will have access to resources and support from ASU and Phoenix to develop new solutions that develop products and services that contribute to the regional development of a vibrant circular economy. Venture concepts eligible for the incubator include, but are not limited to: conversion of solid waste into new material or energy; services that divert, reuse, or recycle; software applications around sustainability (waste, organic material, reuse, recycling); and design services that focus on sustainability. The Phoenix MRF recycled paper collection line will help provide feedstock to RISN Incubator participants. Photo courtesy of City of Phoenix Public Works Download Full Image

“Fostering public-private partnerships, as well as embracing new and innovative ideas, is integral in achieving Phoenix’s 40 percent waste diversion goal by 2020,” said Ginger Spencer, Phoenix Public Works director. “An incubator, where great minds can get together to grow ideas and find unique solutions, is going to be a critical piece in developing a robust circular economy in our city.” 

Through funding provided by the U.S. Economic Development Administration’s i6 Challenge and from support of the Resource Innovation and Solutions Network (RISN), a public-private network established in partnership between ASU and Phoenix, the RISN Incubator will assist and mentor aspiring new ventures within a wide range of developmental stages.

The RISN Incubator is accepting applicants who are in the early stages of development. Selected ventures will receive training and services including dedicated venture mentors who will guide their advancement and facilitate access to technical experts, business plan development and investor network management training, access to feedstock from Phoenix’s waste transfer station and a process for continuous evaluation and pre-qualification for funding opportunities.

The priority waste feedstocks that the successful ventures will have access to include plastics, batteries, carpeting and carpet foam, broken furniture, mattresses, textiles, food waste, compost and plastic film. Innovators may also respond to an open call for other materials or items in the waste stream.

“ASU identifies innovation and the support of new ventures as essential to the development of a strong economy at local, regional and global scales,” said Ji Mi Choi, associate vice president of ASU’s Knowledge Enterprise Development, leading Entrepreneurship and Innovation which includes the new RISN Incubator. “Between the expertise at ASU and the material and practice resources at the city of Phoenix, we are excited to work with the ventures that will be creating exciting new solutions to our waste and energy challenges.”

Joining ASU to lead the RISN Incubator as its director is Alicia Marseille. Marseille brings a wealth of start-up and economic development experience from her recent position as director of the U.S. Small Business Administration’s Women’s Business Center, AWEEc. Marseille will apply her decade of national and international background in public/private partnerships, emerging markets, growth strategies and financial modeling to the RISN Incubator’s development.

This call for innovators and entrepreneurs is open until July 24 with the challenge kicking off Aug. 25.

For more information including the application, visit RISNincubator.asu.edu.

Jason Franz

Senior manager, Marketing and Communications, Walton Sustainability Solutions Initiatives

480-727-4072

Pages