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ASU women’s basketball hosts final home series this weekend


February 20, 2017

Make it a family affair Friday night with a purchase of the Family Four Pack as the ASU women's basketball team hosts its final home series this weekend at Wells Fargo Arena in Tempe.

For only $60, enjoy four reserved-seating tickets and $10 food vouchers to the game Feb. 24 against USC at 8 p.m. Young fans are encouraged to wear their favorite royal attire for Prince & Princess Day! Princess Belle, Cinderella, Elsa and Anna will be in attendance for pictures, storytime and a halftime performance. ASU womens basketball Download Full Image

The team will then finish up regular-season play when the Sun Devils host No. 18 UCLA on Sunday, Feb. 26, at noon. Senior Sun Devils Sophie Brunner, Quinn Dornstauder, Sara Hattis and Kelsey Moos will be honored in a ceremony following the game. Senior citizens attending the game have the opportunity to purchase $5 discounted tickets at the box office for Senior Day. It’s also the last “Sunday Funday” of the season with all kids 12 and younger receiving free admission to the game. Purchase your tickets online today. See you there at the arena!

Territorial Cup Series returns to Tempe with women's basketball


February 14, 2017

The Territorial Cup Series returns to Tempe. Sun Devil Women’s Basketball will battle Arizona at 4 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 19.

It’s the "Gold Out" game and the first 1,000 fans will receive a rally towel giveaway. We are also celebrating the 10 year anniversary of the 2006-2007 Sun Devil Women’s Basketball NCCA Elite 8 team. Former players will be in the building to help us celebrate their accomplishments. Download Full Image

Tickets are still available, so purchase your $5 discounted tickets with promo code GOLD at promo.sundeviltickets.com and come wearing gold!

Sun Devil Wrestling home finale


February 7, 2017

Don’t miss your last chance to see No. 21 Sun Devil Wrestling at home, and watch as No. 1 ranked Zahid Valencia looks to stay undefeated on the season. The Sun Devils take on Pac-12 opponent Cal State Bakersfield in the home finale at 7 p.m. Feb. 9 inside Wells Fargo Arena. It will be another opportunity for the Sun Devils to add to this historic season that includes the following accomplishments:

  • a top 10 finish at the Cliff Keen Invitational; best finish since 2006
  • third place at Midlands Championships, including two individual championships; best finish since 1989
  • defeated Iowa State in Ames, Iowa for first the time since 1989
  • third place at the Virginia Duals; best finish since 1997

Be the advantage the Sun Devils need to make it 2-0 at home against Pac-12 competition this season. Get your tickets online or by calling 480-965-5812. Download Full Image

ASU Police Department expands self-defense classes to include more men, women


February 6, 2017

This spring, Arizona State University Police Department hosts self-defense classes designed to make everyone feel safer no matter what their gender. View all upcoming classes on ASU Events.

Men in the ASU community now are eligible for R.A.D. for Men, which is designed to empower participants to make safer choices when confronted with aggressive behavior. Certified R.A.D. instructors teach each 12-hour class. Certified R.A.D. instructors teach the 12-hour classes. Participants should wear exercise-style clothing and closed-toe shoes. Download Full Image

“The ASU Police Department is excited to offer this self-defense class to the men in our community,” ASU Police Chief Michael Thompson said. “It raises awareness about potentially violent encounters and gives men the tools to recognize, avoid or, as a last resort, defend themselves.” 

The 12-hour R.A.D. for Men course includes self-defense, situational and conversational scenarios. Men may register for the first class on Feb. 24 and 25.

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R.A.D. for Men is available because of the sustained interest in women’s self-defense courses. 

Since September 2015, R.A.D. Basic certified 225 women in 17 classes. Women who complete R.A.D. Basic certification may take R.A.D. Advanced, which began in November 2016.

The six-hour R.A.D. Advanced takes R.A.D. Basic to the next level and is scheduled monthly through April. The program covers multiple encounter types and low- or diffused-light simulation exercises.

Officer Laura Gill leads the women’s advanced courses, which includes six different defense themes. Participants may take the courses individually to learn specific advanced strategies, and each class begins with a R.A.D. Basic refresher.

“I love watching the light in a participant’s eyes when she realizes she has more power and strength inside of her than she ever imagined,” Gill said. “It is amazing to lead a program offering that moment of growth to other women.”

ASU offers services and education:

Resources:

Peter Northfelt

Editor assistant, Business and Finance Communications Group

480-727-4059

 
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ASU business students provide free tax-preparation help

ASU business students volunteer to do free tax prep for qualified taxpayers.
February 2, 2017

IRS-sponsored program offered at West campus for low- to moderate-income taxpayers

Students in the W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University will provide free tax-preparation services to qualified people at the West campus through April 15.

The students are part of Volunteer Income Tax Assistance program, sponsored by the Internal Revenue Service and local organizations to provide free tax preparation to people who generally make $54,000 or less, people with disabilities and those with limited English proficiency.

In addition to supporting the community, the VITA program gives W. P. Carey students the opportunity to gain real-life experience as tax preparers, according to Donald Frost, a lecturer in accountancy at W. P. Carey, who is the liaison for the VITA program.

“Students not only develop their technical skills, but also enhance ‘soft skills,’ such as communication, empathy, patience, compassion and problem-solving by working with diverse client populations," he said.

For the 2015 tax filing season, students processed nearly 1,800 income tax returns, generating approximately $1.47 million in refunds.

The student volunteers will be working in Room 238 of the Classroom/Lab/Computer building at the West campus, 4701 W. Thunderbird Road, Glendale. Sessions will run from 4 to 8 p.m. every Thursday through April 13, except for March 9, and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. every Saturday through April 15, except for March 11.

No appointment is needed, and returns will be prepared on a first-come, first-served basis for qualifying taxpayers. Click here to see what to bring to the session.

Free parking is available at Lot 20 on the West campus.

For information, contact Frost at Donald.frost@asu.edu.

 
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February 2, 2017

Ceremony recognizes outstanding achievements by Robert Nemanich, Anne Stone and Paul Westerhoff

Three Arizona State University faculty were honored by ASU President Michael Crow in a ceremony Wednesday as the university's 2016-2017 Regents' Professors. This highest faculty honor was conferred on professors Robert Nemanich, Anne Stone and Paul Westerhoff. It is bestowed on full professors who have made outstanding achievements that have brought them national and international distinction.

See photos from Wednesday's ceremony and scroll down for individual videos on these remarkable faculty:

Robert Nemanich, Department of Physics, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

 

Anne Stone, School of Human Evolution and Social Change, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

 

Paul Westerhoff, School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment, Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering

Pack the house at Sun Devil Women’s Basketball


January 31, 2017

Calling all Sun Devil Fans, we need you to pack the house as No. 23 Women’s Basketball battle No. 11 Oregon State at 8 p.m. Friday, Feb. 3.

It’s the 2016 Pac-12 co-champion showdown in Wells Fargo Arena and you won’t want to miss it. It’s also Faculty-Staff Appreciation Night, so don’t forget to purchase your $5 discounted tickets through your online account. The first 1,000 fans in attendance receive a Sparky bobblehead. Download Full Image

The team will then close out the weekend on Sunday, Feb. 5 during the Annual Breast Cancer Awareness PINK game as they matchup against Washington at noon. Purchase $5 discounted tickets by using promo code PINK at promo.sundeviltickets.com or just wear pink to the game. 

Be sure to arrive early for the Direct Sales Event on the east concourse, where you can purchase merchandise from some of your favorite companies. Doors open at 10 a.m. Here is the full list of participants: 

• Mary Kay
• Scentsy
• Origami Owl
• Pampered Chef
• It Works
• NYR Organic
• Avon
• Premier Designs
• LuLa Roe
• Herbalife
• Younique

Sun Devil Dining hosts faculty, staff dining discount day Jan. 30


January 27, 2017

Sun Devil Dining is hosting a faculty and staff discount day at all of its residential dining locations on all four Arizona State University campuses from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Monday, Jan. 30.

It is $6 to get into any of the all-you-care-to-eat locations. Barrett, the Honors College dining hall is $8.25.  Sun Devil Dining hall Download Full Image

Hassayampa and Barrett dining hall will be featuring the Tepa burger at their grill upon request and the Sun Devil Dining sustainability team will be at Pitchforks residential restaurant sampling tepa tacos that will be featured at the Pitchforks Baja station.  

The Tepa product sources locally-grown tepary beans from the Pima reservation lands by Ramona Farms and the Pima community farms along the Gila River. Tepa also sources fresh carrots, kale, lemons and spices from Arizona and is handcrafted in Flagstaff, Arizona.

 

 
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ASU announces $1.5 billion comprehensive campaign

Campaign ASU 2020 aims to educate community about value of private support.
Wide-ranging comprehensive campaign is about gifts both large and small.
55,600 students have already benefited from scholarships during the campaign.
January 26, 2017

Funds raised in Campaign ASU 2020 to fuel discovery, champion student success and enrich community, among other initiatives

Developing an Ebola treatment. Caring for a city’s homeless population. Opening pathways to higher education through scholarships.

Such accomplishments take intelligence, compassion — and generosity. To make possible more such life-changing actions, Arizona State University is embarking on a comprehensive campaign to raise at least $1.5 billion to accelerate its mission.

Campaign ASU 2020 is a strategic effort that will focus the entire university’s development energies on one goal — to permanently raise the long-term fundraising capacity of the university. The donations will fund scholarships, faculty research, labs, projects to ensure that students succeed to graduation, arts initiatives and ventures in the community.

ASU President Michael M. Crow said the campaign comes at a pivotal time when the university is reflecting on its successes and building on that momentum.

“Campaign ASU 2020 is our moment in time to say, ‘Yes, we’ve been able to do that. Look at who we are.’ It’s not just the faculty and it’s not just the students and it’s not just the staff. It’s the hundreds of thousands of people and the thousands of organizations that are behind us to move this university forward,” he said.

The campaign has been in a “quiet” phase since 2010 — with $1 billion already raised through donations by corporations, organizations and, especially, individuals — 260,000 individuals have contributed so far, and 55,600 students have benefited from scholarships during the campaign.

 

Campaign ASU 2020 officially kicked off Thursday night at a gathering of university leaders and supporters. The focus of the night — and the message of the philanthropic effort — is how the work of ASU touches individuals, both on campus and in the community.

Megan Phillips, a global health major at ASU, has walked the streets of Phoenix with her fellow students to care for homeless people. She said her work at a downtown shelter and at the Student Health Outreach for Wellness clinic provides hope and dignity to homeless people.

“But it also provides students like me the chance to broaden their perspectives and serve the community in a very real way,” said Phillips, who is now the director of programs for the student-run clinic. The clinic is in the midst of raising $5,000 to help further its programs. Read more here.

Professor Charles Arntzen, who has saved lives with the Ebola treatment he developed at ASU, said the private funding he received allowed him to try something new and develop it into the leading therapeutic for Ebola.

“I can’t tell you how wonderful it feels to be a scientist who started with a crazy idea and ended up seeing that our product saved lives in Africa,” said Arntzen, who is a Regent’s Professor and holds the Florence Ely NelsonThe Florence Ely Nelson Presidential Chair in Plant Biology was created by created by an endowment from Florence Nelson, who, Arntzen said, "gave me the freedom to explore blue-sky ideas that would typically be considered too risky for conventional grant programs. Florence’s visionary investment ultimately led the way to our discovery of ZMapp, today’s most promising drug treatment for people infected with Ebola." Presidential Chair in Plant Biology.

Crow said that ASU produces change at a huge scale, but it starts with individuals.

“It’s these people who are going to go out and produce these new ideas, produce the changes across the entire spectrum of society,” he said.

ASU must pursue larger, more important goals, Crow said, and become the model for future of higher education.

“This campaign will allow us to build on the momentum of all that we have established thus far and solidify our position as the first institution to successfully blend this level of academic excellence and egalitarian access,” he said.

A history of philanthropy

The university’s very beginning was because of a gift. Donor Craig Weatherup explained that in 1885, local butcher shop owners George and Martha Wilson gave 15 acres of pastureland to build the Territorial Normal School. He noted that two previous fundraising campaigns, in the 1980s and the 1990s, both exceeded their targetsIn the 1980s, the Centennial Campaign set a goal of $75 million and raised $114 million, and in the 1990s, when the campaign set a goal of $300 million and raised $560 million..

“Of course, it’s important to note that we didn’t arrive at this point overnight,” said WeatherupCraig Weatherup is an honorary co-chair of ASU’s President’s Club., former founding chairman and CEO of Pepsi Bottling Group Inc. The Weatherup Family Foundation has funded several initiatives, including the Weatherup Center indoor practice facility and training center for the university’s varsity basketball teams.

He noted other significant donors who have transformed ASU, endowing colleges, launching research centers, building facilities and funding student activities such as the Sun Devil Marching Band.

In addition to fundraising, Campaign ASU 2020 is about educating the community to the value of private support while engaging alumni and friends with the university.

The campaign’s goal of at least $1.5 billion will be distributed this way:

  • $441 million to fuel discovery, creativity and innovation, paying for research, labs, equipment, entrepreneurship opportunities and art galleries.
  • $258 million to drive Sun Devil Athletics competitiveness by increasing scholarships and academic support, adding sports and an Olympic Village on the east side of Rural Road that will include tennis, softball, track and field, soccer, lacrosse, wrestling, gymnastics and volleyball facilities, as well as an Olympic Village-style space for student-athletes.
  • $233 million to elevate the academic enterprise by funding endowed professorships, faculty fellowships and artist-in-residence programs.
  • $220 million to ensure student access and excellence, including scholarships based on need and merit, as well as helping students make progress toward graduation.
  • $184 million to champion student success, which funds students’ learning in real-life situations, study abroad and leadership development.
  • $165 million to enrich our communities, enabling ASU students to participate in local projects, performing arts and public television.

Private support is not a replacement for the university’s other sources of revenue, including investments from the state, students, their families, faculty, staff and research grants. Private support provides the margin of excellence that enables the “extras” that shape excellent, meaningful and impactful university and research experiences.

The campaign, which is being guided by the ASU Foundation for a New American University, is emphasizing the importance of small gifts, noting that in one year, more than 100,000 individual donors gave a total of $215 million that affected every college and school at ASU.

ASU President Michael Crow at Campaign ASU 2020 kickoff

President Michael Crow speaks at Thursday's official kickoff of Campaign ASU 2020 at Chase Field in Phoenix. Photo by Charlie Leight/ASU Now

 

Donors can choose where to giveMany donors choose to restrict their gifts to a certain use or distribution schedule, which can include estate gifts and endowments. Accordingly, many funds raised during the campaign will not be available for immediate spending and will not apply to the university’s yearly operations budget., and ASU’s colleges have set priorities. For example, the W. P. Carey School of Business hopes to raise at least $150 million to fund student scholarships, summer programs and research centers, and to endow faculty chairs and professorships, including one named for Loui Olivas, which would be the first chair named for someone of Hispanic descent at any top 30 business school in the U.S.

Some Campaign ASU 2020 projects would far exceed the boundaries of campus, including creation of “The Culture Lab of the Americas,” a $30 million, 45,000-square-foot building with state-of-the-art classrooms, research labs, event spaces and ASU Art Museum gallery space that will connect artists and designers with practitioners across disciplines. The Culture Lab will be located near the Phoenix Art Museum and Heard Museum and will offer advanced degree programs and research centers through the Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts and the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.

ASU emphasizes projects that cross disciplines, and Lee Hartwell, a Nobel laureate and professor at ASU, spoke about how today’s students will enter a world that’s almost unimaginable now due to rapid technology changes.

“So, we have to do things differently — and we are. I believe that ASU is leading the way,” said Hartwell, who won the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 2001 and is the Virginia G. Piper Chair Virginia G. Piper Chair of Personalized Medicine is funded by a donation by the Virginia G. Piper Charitable Trust.of Personalized Medicine and co-director of the Biodesign Institute's new Center for Sustainable Health.

He has appointments in the colleges of education, biomedical engineering and sustainability, and that gives him the chance to work with diverse colleagues. For example, in the Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College, he is collaborating on a course called Sustainability for Teachers, intended to make the topic dynamic and inspiring.

“We think this is an important first step in educating the next generation on the very real challenges they face,” he said.

Campaign ASU 2020 principals

Campaign ASU 2020 principals (from left) Bill Post, Craig Weatherup, John Graham, Barbara McConnell Barrett and Leo Beus applaud the donations of all individuals and corporations so far; $1 billion has been raised since the campaign's "quiet launch" in 2010. Photo by Charlie Leight/ASU Now

 

Donor Leo Beus described how moving it was to see the effects of his gift. He and his wife, Annette, established the Beus Family New American University Scholarship to support incoming freshmen or community college transfer students who are members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

The couple then were able to interview the students who received the scholarships.

“We had the experience of looking them in the eyes and telling them not to worry because their college tuition was covered — and we knew our investments changed lives,” said Beus, co-founder of Beus Gilbert PLLC. They also supported the Beus Center for Law and Society, the new downtown Phoenix home of ASU’s Sandra Day O’Connor School of Law. The center was designed to also house the nation’s first teaching law firm, a law library open to the public and a legal triage service to help the public find legal support.

Jackson Dangremond, president of the Undergraduate Student Government on the Downtown campus and a junior majoring in health care innovation, noted the donations that have already been made.

“Every step moves us one step closer to achieving our aspirations and making a difference in countless lives.”

For more about Campaign ASU 2020, visit giveto.asu.edu. Want to learn more about what a comprensive campaign is and why a public university needs private support, read the campaign primer from the experts at the ASU Foundation.

 

Top photo: Fireworks, singers and band members from the ASU School of Music celebrate at the conclusion of the official launch of Campaign ASU 2020 on Thursday at Chase Field in Phoenix. The goal is to raise at least $1.5 billion by the year 2020, with $1 billion already raised since the campaign's "quiet launch" in 2010. Photo by Charlie Leight/ASU Now

'Nothing' and the universe

Nobel Laureate Frank Wilczek to talk about ‘materiality of a vacuum’ at ASU Origins Project event


January 24, 2017

Arizona State University’s Origins Project is hosting a lecture by Nobel Laureate Frank Wilczek, where he will discuss the “Materiality of a Vacuum: Late Night Thoughts of a Physicist” at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 31, at the Tempe Center for the Arts.

In modern physics, scientists have found that it is fruitful to regard empty space, or a vacuum, as a sort of material, which can have within it exotic properties like superconductivity. Conversely, materials can be viewed from the inside and the vacua of alternative worlds, which often have exotic, mind-expanding properties. These ideas suggest new possibilities for cosmology and bring to life the profound question: What is a universe? Wilczek’s lecture will be followed by a conversation with Lawrence Krauss, director of the Origins Project. Nobel Laureat Frank Wilczek will discuss the role of nothing in our universe in an Origins Project-sponsored lecture on Jan. 31. Photo by Justin Knight Photography Download Full Image

“It is one of the most remarkable aspects of modern physics that the properties of our universe, with 100 billion galaxies each containing 100 billion stars, turns out to crucially depend on the properties of empty space,” said Krauss. “In this sense, ‘everything’ is determined by ‘nothing.’ Understanding how this comes about gives us a unique new perspective on our place in the universe. There are few people more capable of relating these new ideas than Frank Wilczek, who himself played a seminal role in discovering them.”

Wilczek is the Herman Feshbach professor of physics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and he is an Origins Project distinguished professor at ASU. He received the Nobel Prize in physics in 2004 for his work on asymptotic freedom in the theory of strong interaction.

Krauss is an author, professor, physicist and public intellectual. In addition to being director of the Origins Project, Krauss is an ASU professor in the School of Earth and Space Exploration and in the Department of Physics.

Tickets for “Materiality of a Vacuum: Late Night Thoughts of a Physicist” are $7 and $17. ASU students can obtain free tickets (two tickets per student ID to be picked up the venue box office) for the event. A book signing and pizza will follow the event.

The Tempe Center for the Arts box office is located at 700 W. Rio Salado Parkway, or call 480-350-2822.

For more information on Origins events, please go to www.origins.asu.edu or call (480) 965-0053.

Associate Director, Media Relations & Strategic Communications

480-965-4823

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