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Sun Devil Wrestling takes on North Carolina Nov. 20


January 17, 2017

No. 13 Sun Devil Wrestling looks to build on their momentum when they take on No. 19 North Carolina at 7 p.m. Jan. 20.

The Sun Devils enter the match 1-0 in 2017 and 3-1 overall on the season. As one of the nation’s top teams, the Sun Devils currently feature five ranked wrestlers including No. 1 ranked, and still undefeated Zahid Valencia. Don’t miss this marquee matchup on MMA Night that will include special-guest appearances by Sun Devil alumni, including Cain Velasquez. Download Full Image

Tickets for the match are only $5. Grab yours now by purchasing online or by calling 480-965-5812.

 

Sun Devil Women’s Basketball upcoming games


January 11, 2017

Take a break from your schedule with Sun Devil Women’s Basketball as they take on Washington State at 11 a.m. Jan. 13. It's also Sparky’s Kids to College Field Trip Game, where you might meet future Sun Devil students.

Then the team will close out the weekend on Jan. 15 as they host No. 8 Washington at 6 p.m. It’s Sunday FunDay at Wells Fargo Arena and all kids 12 & younger will receive free admission to the game. Download Full Image

Kids will be able to enjoy arts and crafts, balloon artists on the east concourse of the arena and shoot hoops on the mini baskets. It’s also the annual Green Game and Bring Your Daughter to a Game Day, where the first 1,000 daughters will receive a flower giveaway. Purchase $5 discounted tickets with promo code GREENGAMEASU at promo.sundeviltickets.com.

ASU expands lab coat laundry program


January 11, 2017

Arizona State University provides laboratory coat laundry services to all ASU researchers on every campus. The current program can launder around 2,000 lab coats, about 50 per week, and is free for lab employees. The pilot laundered 500 lab coats since fall 2016. 

The program is more sustainable than disposable lab coats, may make labs more sustainable overall and assists researchers in keeping lab coats safe and sanitary. Environmental Health and Safety recommends faculty, staff, student workers and volunteers launder their coats at least twice a year and more often as necessary. Lab Coats worn by ASU researchers The expanded lab-coat laundry program has cleaned about 500 lab coats since fall 2016 and has the capacity to clean 2,000 coats. Download Full Image

“This program protects researchers and keeps the research in the lab where it belongs,” according to Amanda Hoyt, Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering chemical safety specialist. “Having an effective way to launder lab coats and making it free and convenient to use makes lab coats much safer.”

Most researchers have a lab coat drop-off location near their laboratory, but some locations may mail lab coats for laundering. Learn more about how to participate from the lab coat webpage.

Program development

The program began when EHS Compliance Officers identified that many labs could not find a cost-effective laundry service. Fulton Schools compliance officer Alana LaBelle presented the concept to the EHS Policy Committee in May 2016.

A team of EHS staff, departmental safety compliance officers and representatives from Mail Services and Procurement introduced the concept and recommended the program to university administrators.

Knowledge and Enterprise Development and University Business Services jointly funds this program for the first year.

Read more about the Lab Coat Laundry Service on the EHS webpage. Learn more about the Compliance Officer program.

Peter Northfelt

Editor assistant, Business and Finance Communications Group

480-727-4059

Changemakers to be honored at ASU MLK Jr. Celebration


January 9, 2017

One ASU student and two influential Arizonans were selected as the 2017 Community Servant-Leadership awardees as a part of Arizona State University's 32nd annual Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration for their influential work in the community.

Amber Poleviyuma and Lattie and Elva Coor will be honored at the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Breakfast Celebration on Jan. 19 at the ASU Polytechnic campus. Lattie and Elva Coor Community Servant-Leadership Awardees Elva and Lattie Coor will be honored at the ASU Martin Luther King Jr. Breakfast Celebration on Jan. 19 for their contributions to the community. Download Full Image

The awardees were selected by the ASU MLK Jr. Committee for their servant leadership, for their philosophy of serving first, then leading as a way of expanding service.

The breakfast will also honor 24 students in grades K-12 who were selected from more than 1,300 entries, as winners of the committee’s s annual statewide children’s essay and drawing contest

Contest participants were required to either create a poster illustrating their definition of leadership through service, or write an essay or poem about an individual who personifies that definition. This year’s theme is "Be the face of change."

Poleviyuma, the Student Servant-Leadership awardee, is a community health student at ASU’s College of Nursing and Health Innovation.

“The teachings of my grandpa and my mom instilled the values that I have that make me want to give back and contribute to the community,” she said.

Inspired by her family, members of the Hopi tribe in northern Arizona’s Moenkopi village, Poleviyuma said she aims to use her research to affect policy. In accordance with the Native American values of community and selflessness, she hopes to make a difference in the community and expand communication and understanding across racial and ethnic barriers.

“Even though we don’t have a lot of money and we’re from a place that doesn’t have a lot of resources, we still find ways to give back to each other,” Poleviyuma said.

Although she is interested in addressing a wide variety of issues including environmental, government and health issues, she said she is especially focused on reducing the number of youth suicides on Native American reservations through culturally relevant preventative programming. In 2014, Poleviyuma worked with the Center for American Indian Resilience to conduct research for the Native American Cancer Prevention project, which explored the experiences of Native American cancer patients with health-care providers. She helped found Native Americans for Academics, Success and Unity, an ASU club meant to help Native American students reach their academic goals while engaging with the community.

“That was a way to help with representation and give Native students here on campus a place to be and ways to give back,” she said.

Poleviyuma also worked with the ASU Tribal Nations Tour to reach out to Native American students throughout the state and inspire these students to pursue a college degree upon completing high school. She said Martin Luther King Jr. stood up for people who couldn’t stand up for themselves, and she hopes to do the same.

Poleviyuma says she leads by example to create greater understanding among different peoples, and in this way, hopes to show that these issues aren’t just Native American issues — they’re shared issues.

Native Arizonans Lattie and Elva Coor, the Community Servant-Leadership awardees, have a rich tradition of giving back to the community in a variety of leadership roles. Lattie F. Coor is President-Emeritus and Ernest W. McFarland Arizona Heritage Chair in Leadership and Public Policy at ASU, and chairman and CEO of the Center for the Future of Arizona.

“All of us have an opportunity to bring attention to these issues and then speak out on them,” he said.

Growing up, Coor lived in a diverse area in Avondale, which inspired him to become a champion for equal access to education, regardless of socioeconomic or racial background. 

“The world as I knew it had this rich array of people. ... A significant number were low-income,” Coor said. “I had the privilege of seeing there, what education could do for their lives.”

Throughout his adult life, Coor worked to make the equal opportunity he envisioned into a reality and has received many awards for his work thus far. For the past 26 years, he has served as a university president, first at the University of Vermont from 1976 to 1989, then at Arizona State University from 1990 to 2002. During his time at ASU, he hoped to make the university’s population reflect the diversity within the community.

“There were major ways to change and shape it for the future, and it was that, above all, being in a university and being able to help it as it grew and developed, is what caused me to devote my whole career to that,” Coor said.

In 2002, he founded the Center for the Future of Arizona, a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization designed to research and act upon issues relating to the state’s economy, quality of life and civic health. One of the organization’s main focuses is education, and includes a program called SpeakOut AZ that was designed to increase civic participation throughout Arizona and include civics curriculum in schools. 

SpeakOut AZ was created by Coor’s wife and co-awardee, Elva Coor, who has held roles in government and political activities at the local, state and national level, as she seeks to increase community participation in government. Elva Coor also founded a business, which she managed for 20 years, and the Arizona chapter of the National Association of Business Women.

In addition to founding the President’s Community Enrichment Programs at ASU, which aims to unite the university with its surrounding community, Elva Coor has also served on boards and volunteered with many organizations. She also co-founded Building Great Communities, and founded an organization meant to increase the graduation rate of African-American students at ASU.

She said her years of working in the political arena, business, academia and nonprofits led her to value a well-informed and engaged electorate. 

“The success of our great country depends upon providing every child with a good start and great education that prepares them for college, careers and their lives,” Coor said. “Our political system is dependent upon that kind of success, and is dependent upon each of us being involved to help millions of people emerge from poverty.”

For more information about the 2017 MLK Jr. Committee and events celebrating Dr. King’s legacy, go to asu.edu/mlk.

Marketing and Communications Assistant, ASU Gammage

480-965-3462

ASU Gammage completes fundraising for Elevate and Alleviate Campaign


January 6, 2017

ASU Gammage, its donors and the community helped raise more than $9 million during the Elevate & Alleviate Campaign as part of the 50th Anniversary Golden Gammage Initiative, to sustain the performing arts center for future generations and make improvements to enhance patrons’ show experience.

Renovations include expanding the venue’s restroom facilities, improving accessibility by building elevators and revamping the theater’s sound system. ASU Gammage auditorium renovations ASU Gammage, its donors and the community raised more than $9 million to help renovate the auditorium and ensure its use by future generations. Download Full Image

Construction on the new restrooms and elevators began over the summer and is set to be completed in March 2017.

The campaign began in March 2015 with a $3 million lead gift from The Kemper & Ethel Marley Foundation, which was matched by Arizona State University.

Fundraising capped off in December 2016 with an additional personal gift from ASU Gammage 50th Anniversary Board members and local philanthropists Laurie and Chuck Goldstein. Laurie is also an ASU trustee.

Other major gift donors include Susan and William Ahearn, Pat Langlin-Brazil and George Brazil Plumbing & Electrical and the Margaret T. Morris Foundation.

Rendering of upgraded restrooms at ASU Gammage

ASU Gammage Elevate and Alleviate contributions helped fund the renovation and expansion of the venue's restrooms, which are expected to be completed in March.

 

More than 1,500 donors contributed to the project, including significant investments from ASU Gammage as a result of the success of its last two seasons.

“We are grateful to all of the supporters who have shared our vision on this project,” said Colleen Jennings-Roggensack, executive director for ASU Gammage and associate vice president cultural affairs for ASU. “Based on the extraordinary support and ticket sales the last few years, we’re able to turn this into a reality.”

Since 2006, ASU Gammage has created more than $500 million of economic impact for Arizona with its Broadway series, and provided nearly 5 million people with world-class arts experiences.

What started as former ASU President Grady Gammage’s idea to create a distinct university auditorium, is now a world-class presenting organization and a vital cultural and economic engine for Arizona.

The 50th Anniversary Leadership Board includes co-chairs Leslie and Jeff Rich, co-chair Mary Way, William Ahearn, Felice Appell, JO Finks, Grady Gammage Jr., Laurie and Chuck Goldstein, Pat Langlin-Brazil, Albert Leffler, Michael Manning, Sarah Nolan, Bill Way and the late Jerry Appell.

Marketing and Communications Assistant, ASU Gammage

480-965-3462

Start the new year off with Sun Devil Wrestling


January 3, 2017

The Sun Devil wrestling team returns to action this Sunday at 2 p.m., Jan. 8, when they face Cal Poly for their first match of 2017. Fans are asked to be loud and wear gold to help GOLDOUT Wells Fargo Arena. Tickets for the match are only $5 if you buy in advance.

The Sun Devils, led by head coach Zeke Jones, are currently ranked No. 19 in the country and surging forward, due in large part to Zahid Valencia and Anthony Valencia — two of the most impressive freshmen in the country. Be the home-mat advantage for the Sun Devils in this Pac-12 matchup. Get your tickets online or by calling 480-965-5812. Download Full Image

Women’s basketball New Year’s game against California


December 23, 2016

Welcome in the new year with Sun Devil Women’s Basketball when they face California at 3 p.m. Jan 1.

It will be a game of firsts featuring a post-game yoga class on the court. Download Full Image

Fans who bring their yoga mats on game day will receive a $1 game ticket at the box office.

It’s also the first Take a Kid to the Game promotion of the 2017 year. Children 12 and younger will receive free admission to the game with a regularly priced adult ticket purchased at the box office.

Women’s basketball battles Stanford Dec. 30 during Snow Day


December 23, 2016

Don’t miss the Pac-12 Game of the Week when No. 23 Sun Devil Women’s Basketball squares off against No. 10 Stanford at 4 p.m., Dec. 30.

Be sure to arrive early to enjoy snow and complimentary hot chocolate, provided by Sodexo, during Snow Day in the Sun Devil Arboretum. Download Full Image

Festivities start at 2:30 p.m. with a pre-purchased $5 discounted game ticket. The first 1,000 fans in attendance also will receive a Coach Charli Big Head.

Purchase your tickets now with promo code SNOW to receive discount.

Maroon Monsoon for Sun Devil Women's Basketball against Holy Cross


December 16, 2016

Sun Devil Women’s Basketball is back in action on Dec. 21 as they host Holy Cross at 5 p.m. during Maroon Monsoon.

Be sure to wear maroon and arrive early as the first 1,000 fans in attendance will receive a Maroon Monsoon T-shirt. Download Full Image

Tickets are still available starting at just $8.

Lisa Robbins

editor/publisher, Media Relations and Strategic Communications

480-965-9370

Sun Devil Women's Basketball Teddy Bear Toss vs. Oral Roberts Dec. 17


December 15, 2016

Enjoy the holiday break with Sun Devil Women’s Basketball.

The team will take on Oral Roberts on Saturday, Dec. 17 during Native American Day. Enjoy festivities starting at noon with authentic goods, food and entertainment around the outside concourse of Wells Fargo Arena on the Tempe campus before tip-off at 2 p.m. Download Full Image

Fans are also encouraged to bring a teddy bear to the game for our Teddy Bear Toss. All teddy bears will be thrown on court at halftime and donated to Hope Women’s Center. Fans who bring a teddy bear will receive $5 tickets purchased at the box office. 

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