RefWorks subscription to end June 30


April 24, 2019

Over the last year, the ASU Library has helped the ASU community prepare for the end of its subscription to RefWorks, effective June 30.

Since August 2018, the ASU Library has sent out multiple communications, held drop-in sessions and offered one-on-one help to RefWorks users to move their citations into another citation manager. student sitting at a computer Due to low usage and new technology platforms, the ASU Library will be ending its subscription to RefWorks, effective June 30. Download Full Image

If you still have citations in RefWorks, please plan to move them from RefWorks to another citation manager before June 30. After that date, your citations will no longer be available in RefWorks.

For more information on this transition, visit the ASU Library's RefWorks Transition page, which includes step-by-step instructions on how to move your citations from RefWorks to another citation manager.

If you have questions or concerns, or need additional help, please email RefWorks@asu.edu. The ASU Library's citation management team will be happy to help you.

Britt Lewis

Communications Specialist, ASU Library

 
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ASU’s green waste goes full circle

April 17, 2019

Circular resource system turns campus waste into compost for ASU's grounds

Arizona State University continues to create a more sustainable and resilient future — and not just during Earth Month.

The university has implemented a closed-loop process for composting green waste on all campuses.

Video by Ken Fagan/ASU Now

Composting is the act of recycling organic material, plant matter and food scraps. The materials become compost, a finished product that can be used as a soil amendment. Compost provides several benefits:

  • Acts as a fertilizer for your landscape.
  • Helps your soil become a water filter, reducing runoff and improving water quality.
  • Keeps plant diseases and pests away.
  • Reduces how much, and how often, you need to water.

ASU Grounds Services, the ASU Zero Waste department and the city of Phoenix participate in the university’s composting process, which supports ASU’s circular resource system sustainability goal.

A circular resource system aims to achieve zero waste by diverting materials from landfills for productive use.

“ASU’s green waste composting program is a great example of a circular economy,” said Josh Ellner, ASU Zero Waste department manager. “Partnering with the city of Phoenix allows ASU to achieve benchmarks regarding our landfill diversion goals by having a large enough local operation to process a large amount of material and also have enough finished product to sell back to ASU Grounds.”

ASU’s green waste — tree trimmings and grass clippings from all campuses­ — is collected and hauled to a city of Phoenix composting facility where it spends six to eight weeks in the composting process. ASU purchases the finished product to use on flowerbeds, lawns and fields throughout the university. 

Video by Ken Fagan/ASU Now

“The compost carries a certain amount of nutrient value on its own, but it also helps to retain water and nutrients,” said Michael Meyer, ASU Grounds Services manager. “The soil in the Valley of the Sun tends to be poor in organic material, and the compost counters that to some degree.”                          

ASU sent an average of 41.6 tons a month of green and wood waste to be composted in 2018. In November, ASU purchased back 190 yards, about 120,000 pounds, of finished compost that was placed on the Tempe Sun Devil Fitness Complex fields, annual flowerbeds and other campus lawns.

According to Meyer, the composting program supports ASU’s overarching goal to achieve 90% landfill diversion by 2025.

“We do get some satisfaction from knowing that we are keeping material out of the landfill where it would contribute to the production of harmful greenhouse gases. For us, it is truly a win-win situation.”

Top photo: A student sifts a pile of compost at the Polytechnic campus. Photo by Ken Fagan/ASU Now

 
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Carbon Free Day: Do your part

Shorten your shower, drive less, buy local foods for April 17 Carbon Free Day.
April 11, 2019

Bike to work, take the stairs, eat a plant-based meal: New signature event for Earth Month encourages ASU community to make pledge

Glaciers melting. Record storms. Rising sea levels. Problems quite off the human scale.

What can little old you do about all of that?

Quite a bit, it turns out. And that is the point of Arizona State University’s Carbon Free Day on April 17: to demonstrate small things everyone can do on a daily or weekly basis that add up.

"ASU is a major force in the area of sustainability education," said Stefanie Lindquist, deputy provost and vice president for academic affairs. "So I like the idea of our active participation in this Carbon Free Day. As such a large institution, we could save putting a lot of carbon into the atmosphere if we committed ourselves to a day of active efforts to reduce our collective carbon footprint."

ASU is committed to becoming climate positive by 2035. The university has made great strides to reduce its carbon emissions since making that pledge. Total emissions are down 28% compared with a 2007 baseline.

“That’s despite the fact we’ve added over 40% gross square footage and almost 31% in our student population in that same period,” said Corey Hawkey, assistant director of University Sustainability Practices. “We’re on the path to meet our goal, but there is still work to be done. It’s part of the reason we’re doing this day. … We’ve made great progress, and it’s something we should all be appreciative of.”

The university — staff, students, faculty and physical buildings together — is estimated to emit about 768 tons of carbon per day. One day of emissions is the equivalent of more than 131,000 average one-way commutes. It’s also close to 24 days of air conditioning in an average-size home. Or, looking through the lens of food, about 232,000 servings of beef.

“That hopefully gives some perspective on how large our emissions are, but also what an impact just a day makes,” Hawkey said.

ASU will be purchasing carbon offsets and planting 218 trees to mitigate the university’s emissions for the day. Join the commitment by making a pledge for Carbon Free Day to reduce carbon emissions. Choose from transportation, food and energy pledge categories or create your own.

“Some believe it is only great power that can hold evil in check, but that is not what I have found. It is the small everyday deeds of ordinary folk that keep the darkness at bay. Small acts of kindness and love.”  — Gandalf, "The Fellowship of the Ring"

Mind you, none of these involve moving into a yurt, biking to Tempe from Buckeye or quitting bacon forever.

“It was important for us to come up with some unique pledges people might not be thinking about, like keeping adequate air pressure in your tires, so your car drives more efficiently and you use less gas,” said Susan Norton, program manager of Sustainability Practices.

Transportation pledges include riding a bike, creating a meal plan to cut down on trips to the store during the week or being an energy-efficient driver. The latter means starting and stopping more slowly and keeping a steady speed. You can keep a ton of CO2 out of the atmosphere just on these alone (the same amount a tree in Arizona absorbs during 10 years), plus you’ll save a lot of money on gas.

Student Casey Rapacki rides a bike 15 minutes each way to campus every day.

“It helps me get some daily activity in, allows me to come and go as I please — no catching the bus! — had a one-time fee and does not contribute to daily car traffic or greenhouse gas emissions,” she said. 

She has also run into fellow School of Sustainability friends on their bikes.

“We all rode our bikes together,” she said. “We were kind of like a biker gang, except fuel-efficient and harmless.”

JC Porter is a bicycling beast. Assistant director of University Parking and Transit Services, Porter commutes 20 miles each way to the Tempe campus, five days a week. “If I am feeling lazy, I commute 7 miles each way to the Polytech campus,” Porter said.

Deservedly, Porter won Tempe’s 2018 Bike Hero award.

Jonathan Kelman, an instructor in the School of Sustainability, rides to work at least four days a week. He gets to think; he saves money on gas, car maintenance and parking; and it’s faster than battling rush hour traffic. Another bonus: “I can commute in to campus on my mountain bike, teach class and then hit the trails in Papago Park north of campus, and ride back home. There may be a burrito involved on the return trip. That's hard to beat!”

Let’s address the obvious excuse against biking right off the bat: The Tempe campus has two free places to shower — the Sun Devil Fitness Complex and Wrigley Hall.

When it comes to food pledges, you don’t have to go vegan, even though one plant-based meal during the week won’t kill anyone. Buy some local groceries from a farmers market. Don’t waste food. Cut down on beef by eating a rack of baby back ribs or a fried chicken. Most emissions from meat production come in the form of methane gas, which cows breathe and excrete via their manure. Eating chicken or pork helps reduce emissions. Who’s not down for ribs?

The point is to commit to make whatever small changes you can.

“Everybody plays a role in it,” Hawkey said.

View the Carbon Free Day pledge choices on the Earth Month website.

Top image: School of Sustainability students and staff bike on the Tempe campus on April 4. Image by Deanna Dent/ASU Now

Scott Seckel

Reporter , ASU Now

480-727-4502

 
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Go ahead, try this at home

April 5, 2019

Citizen Science Day asks everyone to help April 13 and fast-forward Alzheimer's research

From phone apps that measure light pollution to crowdsourced maps that track parasites, the process of collecting scientific data has never been so accessible or so scalable.

“Scientists are looking for information, and people like to contribute. Citizen science is making that happen on a major scale,” said ASU Librarian Dan Stanton, who specializes in citizen science and is coordinating Arizona State University’s participation in the fifth annual Citizen Science Day, a global event scheduled for Saturday, April 13.  

Described as a collaborative process between scientists and the public, citizen science relies on public participation and access to tools to spur the collection of data, a process that can take years — sometimes decades — for researchers to complete.  

This year, Citizen Science Day will center around a “Megathon” activity called stall catching, in support of data collection for Alzheimer’s research underway at Cornell University using the EyesOnALZ online tool created by the Human Computation Institute. The research explores a connection between the disease and clogged blood vessels in the brain, known as “stalls.” Participants will be asked to “catch” stalls by viewing videos documenting the blood flow in the brains of mice and then scoring blood vessels as “flowing” or “stalled.”

It’s estimated that if 100,000 people come together to participate in the activity, it will save researchers at Cornell one year’s worth of analysis.  

“In just one day, we have the power to accelerate Alzheimer’s research by one whole year,” Stanton said. “That’s pretty cool.”  

Stanton is inviting people of all ages and abilities to participate. Anyone can join the Megathon from anywhere in the world as long as they have an internet connection and a desire to help mankind. 

The ASU Library will be hosting the Megathon at four campus locationsTo join the ASU team virtually, register here.

Citizen science wants you!

Yes, you.  

You may be like Darlene Cavalier, who lacked a formal science degree yet remained passionate about participating in the scientific enterprise.  

Now a professor of practice in ASU’s School for the Future of Innovation in Society, Cavalier went on to found SciStarter, an online platform that connects people and communities all over the world to more than 3,000 citizen science projects.  

“I discovered citizen science in grad school and created a project finder to track and write about opportunities for people to engage in science,” Cavalier said. “That project finder became the heart of SciStarter.”  

Cavalier leads an interdisciplinary team at ASU that is aiming to position public libraries as key facilitators of citizen science — a strategy that makes sense given the role of libraries as access points to educational resources and one’s local community.

“Libraries are safe, open spaces accessible to everyone,” said Cavalier, who serves on the National Academy of Sciences committee on citizen science. “Citizen science enables patrons to borrow instruments, such as air-quality sensors or rain gauges, and fully engage in projects at home, or to converge at the library to learn about and participate in real science together as a community. Some libraries are installing sensors and equipment on-site, turning libraries into labs!”

Cavalier and her team, including Stanton, were awarded a grant in 2017 from the Institute of Museum and Library Services to develop field-tested toolkits for public libraries to loan out to their citizen science patrons for two-week periods — a pilot project that has resulted in a growing partnership between ASU and six public libraries in the Phoenix metropolitan area. (These libraries will also be hosting Megathons on April 13.)

Additionally, this year, the team was awarded a grant from the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (Pacific Southwest Region) to develop Citizen Science Day resources, support related events in libraries and produce the Librarian’s Guide to Citizen Science, which includes details about the kits.

“There’s been sizable growth in usage of the kits,” said Stanton, who is working with Cavalier and her team to develop the next phase of kits that more strategically address community needs. “We’re hoping to move from the participatory ‘hey, that’s cool’ Phase 1 kits to more ‘use-inspired’ Phase 2 kits that are specific to Arizona.”

The new library kits will include tools that monitor air quality around the Valley as well as wet-dry mapping to measure surface water, an area of concern for Arizona’s water policy and conservation. These and other kits and tools will also be made available to libraries across the country through SciStarter’s new “Build, Borrow, Buy” feature, thanks to a recent grant from Schmidt Futures.

"Citizen science is growing in the United States and globally,” Cavalier said. “Increasingly, citizen scientists help set the research agenda.”  

In work that aligns with ASU’s universal learning initiative, Cavalier and Stanton are working to formalize the progress of citizen scientists and their contributions to the research community through the development of a series of assessments for credentialing and certification for students enrolled at ASU as well as lifelong learners.

Additionally, Cavalier is developing more customized, data analytics-driven SciStarter portals for K–16 learning environments, Girl Scouts USA, companies and federal agencies where more people can gain access to curated, supported citizen science experiences and contribute to ongoing knowledge — what Stanton says citizen science is all about.  

“Citizen science is educational and participatory. It’s about matching people with projects they can do, projects that interest them, in an effort to bring communities together and make a positive difference,” Stanton said.

The opportunity to contribute to knowledge about Alzheimer’s disease is driving this year’s Citizen Science Day. Those interested in participating are encouraged to get registered and are welcome to join others at any of these four ASU locations from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., on Saturday, April 13.  

Citizen Science Day coincides with the last day of the American Library Association’s National Library Week.  

Top photo: Participants in this year's Citizen Science Day Megathon activity will be asked to “catch” stalls by viewing videos documenting the blood flow in the brains of mice and then scoring blood vessels as “flowing” or “stalled.”

Britt Lewis

Communications Specialist , ASU Library

Alumni Association seeks nominations for ASU Leadership Institute


April 5, 2019

The Alumni Association is seeking nominations for the second cohort of ASU Leadership Institute. Applications are being accepted now through May 17 for this professional and personal leadership development program. 

Sun Devils interested in learning more about ASU Leadership Institute are invited to a special reception at 5:30 p.m. Thursday, April 18, at Pitchforks and Corks, 600 S. College Ave. (second floor of College Avenue Commons). The reception will include a brief presentation about the ASU Leadership Institute and an opportunity to meet members of Class 1. ASU Leadership Institute Class 1 of the ASU Leadership Institute participates in a leadership learning exercise with executives from the W. P. Carey School of Business. Download Full Image

“We launched this program to develop the next generation of leaders invested in higher education and impacting their communities,” said Christine K. Wilkinson, ASU Alumni Association president and CEO. “The Leadership Institute immerses participants in ASU’s teaching, learning and discovery environment equipping them with critical leadership skills. We know the importance and value of continued learning and development. Our inaugural class of this program featured a diverse group of individuals who have demonstrated a strong commitment to leadership, civic engagement and making a difference, and we look forward to recruiting a strong class for the second cohort.” 

ASU Leadership Institute Class 1 member JB Etchamendy, business banking relationship management associate with Wells Fargo Bank, says the program has provided valuable insights for both his professional career and civic engagement. 

“Leaders are passionate about the goals they set out to achieve,” he said. “If your goal is to discover and understand your own value in whatever it is you are passionate about, then the ASU Leadership Institute is the conduit to tap that passion and add your own value to it.”

The program will help participants understand and develop critical leadership skills. The cohort of Class 2 will participate in a leadership assessment tool that provides in-depth analysis and insights identifying key strengths to further develop and areas to enhance.

“The ASU Leadership Institute is an incredible program that offers alums the priceless opportunity to remain connected to the vast ecosystem of the university,” said Morgan Dick, director of money in politics for the Arizona Advocacy Network. “The opportunities for continued growth in leadership both professional and personal, shepherded by ASU, has been a transformative experience.” 

ASU Leadership Institute features nine ASU Innovation Days throughout the course of the program led by experts from fields including business, military, nonprofit management, media, health and science, technology, design and the arts, and applied-use research. The programs works to enlighten, inspire and transform leaders from a variety of professions and communities.

“The Leadership Institute has given me a closer look at what makes ASU No. 1 in innovation,” said Class 1 member Brian Lee, chief financial officer for Landings Credit Union. “Besides gaining access to discover the diverse programs at ASU, we have also engaged in dialogue with the amazing leaders who are constantly finding ways to advance the work at ASU.”

Applications for Class 2 of ASU Leadership Institute must be received by May 17. Successful candidates from the private, public and nonprofit sectors are chosen through a competitive selection process. For more information about ASU Leadership Institute, visit alumni.asu.edu/engage/leadership-institute.

Record number of donors support ASU on Sun Devil Giving Day

Generosity to ASU will fuel scholarships, innovation, emerging programs and student success


March 28, 2019

More than 9,300 individuals gave a record-breaking total of $11.4 million on Sun Devil Giving Day to support the causes they care about at Arizona State University.

Sun Devil Giving Day — celebrated annually on all ASU campuses — lasted for 24 hours on March 21, giving alumni, parents, fans, students, faculty and staff the opportunity to give to causes and ASU programs. Sun Devil Giving Day is an annual celebration of generosity to ASU. Christopher Marohn, program manager for professional education in the Sandra Day O'Connor College of Law (left), and Ray English, assistant dean in the college's Office of Career and Employment Services, take part in Sun Devil Giving Day, an annual celebration of generosity to ASU students, faculty, staff and programs. Download Full Image

“Sun Devil Giving Day gives me the opportunity to support the programs I’ve been a part of,” said Amanda Alibrandi, who studies public administration and nonprofit leadership and management at ASU and is the Micheal Boulden Memorial intern for ASU Enterprise Partners. “It’s important to develop and sustain those programs so more students have access and can benefit from them.”

Supporters had the option to give to a specific ASU college or unit, or to one of the many causes advanced at ASU. Students at each campus had the opportunity to vote on projects they consider important, including clean-water programs, first-generation scholarships, cancer research, environmental sustainability and arts and culture.

In addition to generating support, Sun Devil Giving Day encourages the ASU community to cultivate a culture of philanthropy and an understanding of its impact on the university. Andrew Carey, executive director of donor outreach for the ASU Foundation, said private support gives ASU the margin of excellence it needs to innovate and elevate the university experience for all students, faculty and staff.

Highlights

• Donors surpassed last year’s gift total of 4,325 by 10:50 a.m.

• The number of gifts increased by 115 percent.

• Alumni led the way, with more than 955 donations.

• Donations through Aramark point-of-sale locales increased by 409 percent. These gifts support the Sun Devil Family Association’s Student Crisis Fund and help students facing financial and personal crises.

This year’s total also includes an anonymous gift of $10 million to the W. P. Carey School of Business. When joined with gifts of all sizes from 9,319 donors, Sun Devil Giving Day raised $11,462,634 on behalf of ASU students, faculty, staff and programs.

Story by Shannon Ganzer, ASU Enterprise Partners

Moving beyond Leonardo

ASU Emerge celebrates the legacy and potential of human inventiveness


March 27, 2019

Arizona State University's Emerge, a festival of futures, interweaves art, science and technology to explore the future in evocative ways.

Emerge will showcase the many twists along the road to innovation: unbridled imagination, exquisite observation, epic and mundane failure, surprise and serendipity. Emerge will take visitors on wild rides through the past and spark new thinking about the future of invention through hands-on activities, performances, workshops, exhibits, lectures, experiments and interactive environments.   Leonardo's Ornithopter design This year’s Emerge is a celebration of human inventiveness to mark the 500th anniversary of the death of Leonardo da Vinci and all those devoted to exuberant, unconventional invention. Download Full Image

This year’s Emerge is a celebration of human inventiveness to mark the 500th anniversary of the death of Leonardo da Vinci and all those devoted to exuberant, unconventional invention.

We wanted to honor Leonardo not only for his brilliant inventions but for his boundless curiosity, which led to many discoveries spanning science and art,” said Ed Finn, director of the Center for Science and the Imagination and Emerge co-director. “His life demonstrated how great ideas come from synthesizing many different kinds of information.” 

Since its inception in 2012, Emerge has pushed the envelope of performance, technology and critical thinking by building, sharing and experimenting with visions the future.

The event, taking place on Saturday, March 30 from noon to 8:30 p.m. at Old Main Lawn on the ASU Tempe campus, is free and open to the public.  

“We are all inventors and innovators and often just need a creative push to explore our potential. At Emerge this year, visitors will have the opportunity to play with the idea of invention and explore the myriad ways that invention changes and evolves over time,” said Emerge Director Cynthia Selin, an associate professor with the School for the Future of Innovation in Society and the School of Sustainability.

Emerge will explore invention through four interrelated concepts: interpretation, innovation, inspiration and imagination. Activities and exhibits will be hosted on Old Main lawn in and surrounding large inflated dome structures, creating a unique festival environment. 

Jake Pinholster, associate dean for enterprise design and operations in the Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts and Emerge co-director, describes the vision for the event: "We really wanted, in the spirit of invention, to create something impressive that appears to pop out of the ground overnight. The domes will create a unique environment, a cross between a moon base and a field of giant mushrooms."

ASU Emerge is sponsored by the School for the Future of Innovation in Society, the Center for Science and the Imagination, Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts, the Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering, with support from Intel.

For more information on the event and to register your seat for one of our workshops visit emerge.asu.edu.

Senior Manager, Communications and Marketing Strategy, School for the Future of Innovation in Society

480-727-6193

 
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Sun Devil Giving Day encourages gifts to impactful ASU initiatives

March 19, 2019

Annual event aims to reach record number of givers; pledges will fund scholarships, emerging programs and student success

Over the years, Arizona State University has encouraged its students and alumni to adopt a philosophy of philanthropy in support of higher education.

And the message has been catching on. In fact, it’s what Sun Devil Giving Day is all about.

On Thursday, thousands of Sun Devil alumni, families, faculty, staff and students will celebrate the seventh annual event by supporting the university’s education initiatives and research ventures with a goal of solving some of the most pressing issues facing society today.

“Sun Devil Giving Day is a universitywide celebration of giving at ASU,” said Andrew Carey, executive director of donor outreach for ASU Foundation. “It acknowledges the generosity of our community. It invites people to give to programs they care about. It’s also about understanding what private support does to advance ASU.”

More than 4,300 people made a difference last year when they pledged their support, ranging from $5 gifts to a six-figure amount. All told, they tallied over $600,000. Carey said the goal this year is to reach 10,000 gifts — more than double last year’s total gift count.

Philanthropy helps the university innovate, educate and pay it forward, said Carey. ASU programs include a clean-water initiative in developing countries, the reinvention of athletic facilities, the establishment of new professorships, a staff emergency fund for personnel in crisis, and almost 11,000 private-support scholarships awarded to students in 2019.

Woman holding frame

ASU student Miranda Yousif benefited from Sun Devil Giving Day last year. She is planning a career in the medical field.

Someone who directly benefitted from Sun Devil Giving Day is Miranda Yousif, who as a freshman took a part-time job doing basic lab work in ASU’s Biodesign Institute. She enjoyed it so much she ended up majoring in biological science.

Yousif received a Biodesign Student Travel Grant in February 2018 that was funded through Sun Devil Giving Day. The gift enabled her to travel to a conference in Las Vegas to present to the American Society for Microbiology, where she won an award for best undergraduate presentation. She went on to receive a Fulbright summer grant to study in England.

Now a junior, Yousif is set to graduate next spring and will take the Medical College Admission Test in May.

“All of my experiences at ASU have cemented for me that I want to go to medical school to become a physician,” Yousif said. “Sun Devil Giving Day gave me the opportunity to demonstrate that I am developing my footprint as a scientist."

There are several ways to participate in Sun Devil Giving Day:

• Join the discussion on social media by following the ASU Foundation on Facebook and Twitter.

• Share a story using the hashtag #SunDevilGiving and encourage family and friends to do the same.

• Make an online gift on March 21 to any area of ASU including a school, unit, program or scholarship account.

To raise awareness with the campus community, the ASU Foundation will set up tables from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Palm Walk and Tyler Mall and in front of Wrigley Hall and Hayden Library on the Tempe campus, between the University Center and the Cronkite School on the Downtown Phoenix campus, near the Memorial Union on the Polytechnic campus and outside Fletcher Library on the West campus. The tables will invite students to vote on one of five causes they care about: first-generation students, clean-water projects, the environment, arts and culture accessibility, and cancer research. These are the types of causes that benefit from giving to ASU programs.

This year the ASU Foundation has partnered with Aramark at all four ASU campuses to help raise resources for the Student Crisis Fund. Faculty, staff and students can make a $1 donation, or more, at point of sale at campus restaurants and stores through Thursday.

Sun Devil Giving Day runs from midnight to 11:59 p.m. March 21, and donations are made on the website or secured through the Sun Devil Giving outreach center (Tell-a-Devil Network). The site will display a real-time dashboard showing the total amount of donors and program fundraising totals for the effort.

Gifts will be deposited with the ASU Foundation and may be considered a charitable contribution.

Top photo: ASU student Shannon Ganzer and Cheryl Shumate, vice president of human resources at ASU Enterprise Partners, promote Sun Devil Giving Day in March 2018. Photo courtesy of the ASU Foundation

Reporter , ASU Now

480-727-5176

ASU Gammage unveils 2019-2020 Broadway season


March 12, 2019

ASU Gammage has announced its 2019-2020 Desert Financial Broadway Across America – Arizona season. Tempe audiences will come together for a monumental season complete with an electric mix of the hottest shows on Broadway, Valley premieres, Tony Award-winning shows and the return of a few audience favorites.

The 2019-2020 season kicks off this fall with the love and war story of "Miss Saigon," followed by the romantic musical "Anastasia," along with "Summer" — the biographical musical of the late "Queen of Disco," Donna Summer — and the new production of the classic "Fiddler on the Roof." The season lineup continues with a journey to the Caribbean in Tony Award-winning "Once on This Island;" one show that is truly “fetch” on Broadway, "Mean Girls;" and the remarkable true story of 7,000 stranded passengers after 9/11 and the small town that welcomed them in "Come From Away." flyer featuring various Broadway logos Download Full Image

ASU Gammage is also presenting several season options including Blue Man Group, "Beautiful – The Carol King Musical," and making its triumphant return, Disney’s "The Lion King."

“We have some big Tempe premieres headed our way next season that you do not want to miss,” said Colleen Jennings-Roggensack, executive director of ASU Gammage and ASU vice president for cultural affairs. "Broadway is booming around the world and right here at ASU Gammage. We’re connecting the community to live theater experiences many will never forget.”

The best way to guarantee tickets to the best of Broadway is to purchase a season subscription.

Current season ticket holders can renew their subscription now. New season subscriptions go on sale Monday, May 13.

Subscriptions start at $195 for seven shows and are available at asugammage.com.

The 2019-2020 season includes:

"Miss Saigon" 
Sept. 24-29, 2019 

Experience the acclaimed new production of the legendary musical "Miss Saigon," from the creators of "Les Misérables." This is the story of a young Vietnamese woman named Kim who is orphaned by war and forced to work in a bar run by a notorious character known as the Engineer. There she meets and falls in love with an American GI named Chris, but they are torn apart by the fall of Saigon. For three years, Kim goes on an epic journey of survival to find her way back to Chris, who has no idea he's fathered a son. Featuring stunning spectacle and a sensational cast of 42 performing the soaring score, including Broadway hits like “The Heat is On in Saigon,” “The Movie in My Mind,” “Last Night of the World” and “American Dream,” this is a theatrical event you will never forget.

"Anastasia"
Oct. 29-Nov. 3, 2019

Inspired by the beloved film, the romantic and adventure-filled new musical "Anastasia" is on a journey to ASU Gammage at last! From the Tony Award-winning creators of the Broadway classic "Ragtime," this dazzling show transports us from the twilight of the Russian Empire to the euphoria of Paris in the 1920s, as a brave young woman sets out to discover the mystery of her past. Pursued by a ruthless Soviet officer determined to silence her, Anya enlists the aid of a dashing conman and a lovable ex-aristocrat. Together, they embark on an epic adventure to help her find home, love and family. "Anastasia" features a book by celebrated playwright Terrence McNally, a lush new score by Stephen Flaherty (music) and Lynn Ahrens (lyrics) with direction by Tony Award-winner Darko Tresnjak.

"Summer"
Jan. 7-12, 2020

She was a girl from Boston with a voice from heaven, who shot through the stars from gospel choir to dance floor diva. But what the world didn’t know was how Donna Summer risked it all to break through barriers, becoming the icon of an era and the inspiration for every music diva who followed. With a score featuring more than 20 of Summer’s classic hits including “Love to Love You Baby,” “Bad Girls” and “Hot Stuff,” this electric experience is a moving tribute to the voice of a generation.

"Fiddler on the Roof"
Jan. 28-Feb. 2, 2020

Tony Award-winning director Bartlett Sher and the team behind "South Pacific," "The King and I," and 2017 Tony-winning Best Play "Oslo,' bring a fresh and authentic vision to this beloved theatrical masterpiece from Tony-winner Joseph Stein and Pulitzer Prize winners Jerry Bock and Sheldon Harnick. The original production won 10 Tony Awards, including a special Tony for becoming the longest-running Broadway musical of all time. You’ll be there when the sun rises on this new production, with stunning movement and dance from acclaimed Israeli choreographer Hofesh Shechter, based on the original staging by Jerome Robbins. A wonderful cast and a lavish orchestra tell this heartwarming story of fathers and daughters, husbands and wives, and the timeless traditions that define faith and family. Featuring the Broadway classics “Tradition,” “If I Were a Rich Man,” “Sunrise, Sunset,” “Matchmaker, Matchmaker” and “To Life,” "Fiddler on the Roof" will introduce a new generation to this uplifting celebration that raises its cup to joy! To love! To life!

"Once on This Island"
March 3-8, 2020

“What a delight it is to enter the world of "Once on This Island!" raves The New York Times. Winner of the 2018 Tony Award for Best Revival of a Musical, "Once on This Island" is the sweeping, universal tale of Ti Moune, a fearless peasant girl in search of her place in the world, ready to risk it all for love. Guided by the mighty island gods, Ti Moune sets out on a remarkable journey to reunite with the man who has captured her heart. The groundbreaking vision of two-time Tony Award-nominated director Michael Arden ("Spring Awakening" revival) and acclaimed choreographer Camille A. Brown (NBC’s "Jesus Christ Superstar Live") conjures up “a place where magic is possible and beauty is apparent for all to see!” (The Huffington Post). With a score that bursts with life from Lynn Ahrens and Stephen Flaherty, the Tony Award-winning songwriters of "Anastasia" and "Ragtime," "Once on This Island" is a timeless testament to theater’s unlimited possibilities.

"Mean Girls"
April 21-26, 2020

Direct from Broadway, "Mean Girls" is the hilarious hit musical from an award-winning creative team, including book writer Tina Fey (“30 Rock”), composer Jeff Richmond (“Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt”), lyricist Nell Benjamin ("Legally Blonde") and director Casey Nicholaw ("The Book of Mormon")Cady Heron may have grown up on an African savanna, but nothing prepared her for the vicious ways of her strange new home: suburban Illinois. Soon, this naïve newbie falls prey to a trio of lionized frenemies led by the charming but ruthless Regina George. But when Cady devises a plan to end Regina’s reign, she learns the hard way that you can’t cross a Queen Bee without getting stung.

"Come From Away"
May 26-31, 2020

Broadway’s "Come From Away" is a Best Musical winner all across North America. This New York Times critics’ pick takes you into the heart of the remarkable true story of 7,000 stranded passengers and the small town in Newfoundland that welcomed them. Cultures clashed and nerves ran high, but uneasiness turned into trust, music soared into the night, and gratitude grew into enduring friendships. Don’t miss this breathtaking new musical written by Tony Award-nominees Irene Sankoff and David Hein, and helmed by this year’s Tony-winning best director, Christopher Ashley. Newsweek cheers, “It takes you to a place you never want to leave!” On 9/11, the world stopped. On 9/12, their stories moved us all.

Season options

Blue Man Group

Nov. 15-17, 2019

Blue Man Group performances are euphoric celebrations of human connection through art, music, comedy and nonverbal communication. Since debuting at New York’s Astor Place Theatre in 1991, the live show has expanded to additional domestic residencies in Boston, Chicago, Las Vegas and Orlando, an international residency in Berlin, and multiple North American and world tours, reaching more than 35 million people worldwide. Blue Man Group is universally appealing to a broad range of age groups and cultural backgrounds, and continually injected with new music, fresh stories, custom instruments and sensory stimulating graphics.

"Beautiful"
Feb. 21-23, 2020

"Beautiful – The Carole King Musical" tells the inspiring true story of King’s remarkable rise to stardom, from being part of a hit songwriting team with her husband Gerry Goffin, to her relationship with fellow writers and best friends Cynthia Weil and Barry Mann, to becoming one of the most successful solo acts in popular music history. Along the way, she made more than beautiful music, she wrote the soundtrack to a generation. Featuring a stunning array of beloved songs written by Gerry Goffin/Carole King and Barry Mann/Cynthia Weil, including “I Feel The Earth Move,” “One Fine Day,” “(You Make Me Feel Like) A Natural Woman,” “You’ve Got A Friend” and the title song, "Beautiful," has a book by Tony Award-nominee and Academy Award-nominated writer Douglas McGrath, direction by Marc Bruni, choreography by Josh Prince, and took home two 2014 Tony Awards and a 2015 Grammy Award.

"The Lion King"
June 17-July 12, 2020

Giraffes strut. Birds swoop. Gazelles leap. The entire Serengeti comes to life as never before. And as the music soars, Pride Rock slowly emerges from the mist. This is Disney’s "The Lion King," making its triumphant return to ASU Gammage! More than 85 million people around the world have experienced the awe-inspiring visual artistry, the unforgettable music, and the uniquely theatrical storytelling of this Broadway spectacular — one of the most breathtaking and beloved productions ever to grace the stage. Winner of six Tony Awards, including Best Musical, "The Lion King" brings together one of the most imaginative creative teams on Broadway. Tony Award-winning director Julie Taymor brings to life a story filled with hope and adventure set against an amazing backdrop of stunning visuals. "The Lion King" also features the extraordinary work of Tony Award-winning choreographer Garth Fagan and some of Broadway’s most recognizable music, crafted by Tony Award-winning artists Elton John and Tim Rice. There is simply nothing else like "The Lion King."

Locke to deliver annual ASU A. Wade Smith Memorial Lecture on Race Relations

Mamie Locke, the first African-American woman to be elected mayor of Hampton, Virginia, will speak on 'The Continuing Saga of Race and Racism in American Society'


March 7, 2019

Mamie Locke was the first African-American woman to be elected mayor of Hampton, Virginia. Since 2004, Locke has served as a member of the Senate of Virginia for the 2nd District.

On March 18, Locke will be featured in The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences’ 24th annual A. Wade Smith Memorial Lecture on Race Relations at Arizona State University. Dr. Mamie Locke Mamie Locke Download Full Image

Locke, who earned a PhD in political science from Atlanta University (later Clark Atlanta University) and is a professor of political science and history at Hampton University, will discuss "The Continuing Saga of Race and Racism in American Society."

“We are grateful for the opportunity to invite Dr. Locke to ASU to discuss issues of race and gender in our communities at this year’s A. Wade Smith Memorial Lecture,” said Patrick Kenney, dean of The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.

Who: Mamie Locke
What: 24th annual A. Wade Smith Memorial Lecture on Race Relations
When: 7 p.m. Monday, March 18
Where: Old Main, Carson Ballroom​, ASU Tempe campus

The event is free and open to the public. Seating is limited and on a first-come, first-served basis. Doors will open at 6:30 p.m.

About Mamie Locke

As an elected official, Mamie E. Locke was the first African-American woman to be elected mayor of the city of Hampton. After eight years of service, she became the third African-American woman to win a seat in the Senate of Virginia. Representing the 2nd District, she serves on the following committees: Education and Health, General Laws and Technology, Rehabilitation and Social Services, and Rules. She is the chair of the Senate Democratic Caucus. She also served as chair of the Virginia Legislative Black Caucus.

Throughout her political career, she has been a strong advocate for education, women's rights, affordable housing, Medicaid expansion, increased minimum wage, gun control and equity in the criminal justice system.

About the lecture series

The A. Wade Smith Memorial Lecture on Race Relations was created in 1995 to perpetuate the work of a man who had devoted his life to the idea of racial parity. As professor and chair of sociology at Arizona State University, A. Wade Smith worked tirelessly to improve race relations on the ASU campus and within the greater community.

When he died of cancer at the age of 43, his wife, family members and friends made memorial gifts to establish and fund this lecture series.

Kirsten Kraklio

Content Strategist and Writer, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

480-965-8986

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