ASU Law grad looks forward to degree helping to grow her career and life learnings


November 23, 2020

Editor's note: This story is part of a series of profiles of notable fall 2020 graduates.

As an employed single mother of two, Meghan Kammer saw the Master of Legal Studies (MLS) program at the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law at Arizona State University as a natural way to further her interest in the study of law while continuing to advance her career. Meghan Kammer Meghan Kammer, ASU Law fall MLS candidate, plans to use her degree to continue to grow her career. Download Full Image

Kammer, now a fall ASU Law MLS candidate, says a promotion at the local utility company she currently works for motivated her to pursue the master’s degree with an emphasis in sustainability and human resources and employment.

“Having knowledge and understanding of law and sustainability are keys that will unlock future success and growth in my career,” said Kammer, who also earned her bachelor’s degree in business administration from ASU.

As a mom and full-time student, studying in person and online, Kammer continued to work full time throughout her academic journey. “I learned that I am more capable than I had originally given myself credit for,” she said. “I have been in school for the past five years, and I am about to receive my master’s degree. That is huge for me, and something I did not see myself accomplishing.”

Question: Why did you choose ASU?

Answer: Honestly, I chose to attend ASU because of the reputation the school maintains. I had heard nothing but good things about ASU when I moved to Arizona (from Muncie, Indiana) five years ago and made the decision to enroll at ASU a little over a year later. Being No. 1 in Innovation for several years running is quite the accomplishment and speaks volumes about the university itself, the professors they employ, and the students they teach. I am proud to be a Sun Devil.

Q: Which professor taught you the most important lesson while at ASU?

A: The most important lesson came from Jay Abramson, one of my math professors. I had the pleasure of being in his classroom twice when I was working toward my bachelor’s degree. Professor Abramson was extremely knowledgeable and was able to connect with his students on a personal level – he genuinely cared about everyone. I attended his office hours on a few occasions to get some clarification on how to solve complicated problems. He always gave a bit of life advice at the end of our meetings, and it was very much appreciated and needed — more than he realized, I’m sure. Professor Abramson did not need to give those little tidbits of wisdom, but he did. In doing so, he taught me to always be compassionate and open with others — you never know what the next person is going through. The smallest piece of advice, and just showing that you care, could make a world of difference for someone.

Q: What’s the best piece of advice you’d give to those still in school?

A: No matter how hard it seems, don’t quit. Talk to your professors if you are having trouble — nine times out of 10, they will be understanding and will help you in any way they can. In my experience, the staff at ASU is an amazing group of people. Take your education seriously — it’s one, if not the biggest, of the determining factors of where you will go in life.

Q: If someone gave you $40 million to solve one problem on our planet, what would you tackle?

A: Simply, worldwide hunger. With malnutrition and hunger being one of the top risks to worldwide health, I would emphasize the importance of gardening and provide tools and education for individuals to utilize in order to grow some of their own food.

Julie Tenney

Director of Communications, Sandra Day O'Connor College of Law

ASU Law international grad strives to grow as a human rights advocate


November 23, 2020

Editor's note: This story is part of a series of profiles of notable fall 2020 graduates.

After undergoing a five-year legal education in Albania, Albi Cela was still eager to learn more and continue to better himself as a person and as a future lawyer and human rights advocate. Albi Cela Albi Cela, international ASU Law student in Washington, D.C., is a fall 2020 Master of Laws candidate. Download Full Image

“That is why I decided to apply for the ASU International Rule of Law and Security program,” said Cela, a fall 2020 Master of Laws (LLM) candidate at the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law at Arizona State University. He was introduced to the IRLS program, developed in cooperation with the McCain Institute for International Leadership in Washington, D.C., in 2018 during a visit to ASU’s location there.

“I immediately fell in love with the program and what it offered,” Cela said. “I went back to Albania, I started the application, I got accepted and here I am today almost graduating after an amazing one-year experience. Of course, all this was made possible by the IRLS Jones Day Foundation Fellowship, which funded my studies. I will always be grateful for that.”

Question: Why did you choose this program and ASU Law?

Answer: Many ask me this and the answer is always the same: The IRLS program and ASU complete me and what I want to achieve in life — to be a better person, who fights for what is right in a decent and professional manner.

Q: Which professor taught you the most important lesson while at ASU?

A: The courses and the professors were amazing. It would be difficult to differentiate them from one another. But I must say that classes with Ambassador Clint Williamson were a unique experience. The most important lesson I got out of the experience he shared with us is: “Always do what is right.” And to those who will be here in D.C. for the spring 2021 semester, I really recommend you take his class, and above all enjoy your time while here. 

Q: What was your favorite spot on campus, whether for studying, meeting friends or just thinking about life?

A: My favorite spot on campus is the studying area. I spent a lot of time there studying and thinking what I wanted to do once graduated. I really want to help my country, Albania, become a better place. For now, I believe I can help more if I stay here in the U.S. and get ready to go back and make a real change.

Q: What’s something you learned while at ASU — in the classroom or otherwise?

A: I always strived to be fair and just in every situation. I believe that is that reason I decided to study law and be part of the IRLS program. This program taught me how important rule of law, good governance and human rights are for the democratization of fragile countries. My country, Albania, is one, and I want to use the IRLS experience to help make a change there, from wherever I am.

Q: If someone gave you $40 million to solve one problem on our planet, what would you tackle?

A: I will never forget a line I read from "Just Mercy," a book written Bryan Stevenson, founder of Equal Justice Initiative: “The opposite of poverty isn’t wealth. The opposite of poverty is justice." That is what I would try to tackle — providing justice for those who have been denied.

Julie Tenney

Director of Communications, Sandra Day O'Connor College of Law