West campus advisory board building cyber workforce of future


December 5, 2017

Kim Jones, director of the Cybersecurity Education Consortium (CEC) and professor of practice at ASU’s West campus has organized a Chief Information Security Officer (CISO) Advisory Board.

The mission of this board is to provide opportunities and outreach for the community and general public who have interest in cybersecurity, as well as to determine how the CEC can better serve the cyber workforce, and how current academic courses in cybersecurity can potentially be improved. hands typing on computer keyboard Download Full Image

The board consists of advisers Sheldon Cuffie, David Hoid, Malcolm Harkins, Stanley Jaroki, Jack Jones, David Schauble, Kimberly Trapani and Robert Wahl. These advisers bring together over 150 years of operational security experience from industries such as healthcare, financial services and manufacturing. Together, they work to combine all of their knowledge and experience in support of the CEC.

The members of the CISO Advisory Board allow the CEC to stay up to date in terms of current issues within the cyber community. This in turn allows a better and more current curriculum to be available for cybersecurity students, to whom the board will be regularly exposed in order to be aware of their experiences first hand. In the recent past, cybersecurity students have become out of touch with “real-world” experiences and current cyber technology, and Jones emphasized the importance of the CISO Advisory Board when it comes to keeping the cyber curriculum current.

“As a former CISO I can’t overstate the importance of a practical, interdisciplinary education for our future cyber warriors," she said. "The CISO Advisory Board will help keep the CEC grounded in practicality versus theory, while at the same time helping us to find ways to service the community as a whole.”

CISO Advisory Board members

Sheldon Cuffie

David Hoid

Malcolm Harkins

Stanley "Stash" Jarocki

Jack Jones

David Schauble

Kimberly Trapani

Robert Wahl

Graduating ASU student hopes to inspire teenagers through dance


December 5, 2017

Editor’s note: This is part of a series of profiles for fall 2017 commencement. See more graduates here.

Mayra Causor discovered her love of dance in high school, and after she earns her degree in dance education from Arizona State University this month, she wants to return to high school to share that passion with her students. ASU dance graduate Mayra Causor Dance education graduate Mayra Causor. Download Full Image

“When I started dancing in high school, I knew I found something I was passionate about,” Causor says. “I studied dance at four institutions to gain greater knowledge because I was hungry to learn more and more.”

Causor says students in high school are making decisions in their lives that are important milestones and dance gives them an activity for leisure, a way to learn and grow, a form of self-expression and therapy. For instance, she says she integrates concepts such as body image and explores with students how they can turn what they feel into movement.

“I love dance as an art form. It has helped me build confidence and relieve stress. I get to play and use my body as an instrument for self-expression while sharing that with other students.”

Question: What’s something you learned while at ASU — in the classroom or otherwise — that surprised you, that changed your perspective?

Answer: Being at ASU has allowed me to explore and play with my own abilities as a dancer, which has allowed me to express myself creatively. Getting the chance to collaborate with my peers and learn from teachers who have tremendous knowledge has really contributed to a holistic learning experience at ASU.

Q: Why did you choose ASU?

A: I chose this school because I researched their program and learned what they had to offer. I appreciated that the dance program catered to the creative process while incorporating other disciplines aligned with dance as an art form.

Q: What’s the best piece of advice you’d give to those still in school?

A: For the students still attending ASU I would advise them to take full advantage of the opportunities and resources that the school has to offer. Also, to soak (up) everything about this experience like a sponge because it will be beneficial in the long run.

Q: What was your favorite spot on campus, whether for studying, meeting friends or just thinking about life?

A: When I studied, I would sit at a Starbucks on campus (one of our coolest resources) and enjoy a coffee while admiring the views.

Q: What are your plans after graduation?

A: After graduating, I am hopeful to find a job as a dance teacher. I am close to the finish line, so I am anxious to get my checklist done to be able to do this.

Q: If someone gave you $40 million to solve one problem on our planet, what would you tackle?

A: If I had $40 million, I would help with the natural disasters that affected Mexico and Puerto Rico. This is important to me because it is recent and out of human control. If those events hadn’t happened, I would use the money to help make the planet more eco-friendly. 

Sarah A. McCarty

Communications and marketing coordinator, School and Film, Dance and Theatre, Herberger Institute

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