New ASU visualization and prototyping lab to be dedicated in memory of geometric modeling innovator Gerald Farin

Public invited to Friday ceremony at Grant Street Studios in downtown Phoenix


April 20, 2017

When Gerald Farin worked with colleagues to establish the Partnership for Research in Spatial Modeling (PRISM) center at Arizona State University, he showed how design and the arts at ASU, as well as other disciplines, could benefit from geometric modeling. This Friday, more than two decades later, a new visualization and prototyping lab at the School of Art’s Grant Street Studios in downtown Phoenix will be dedicated in his memory.

“He was a trusted colleague and legendary teacher who guided a generation of students at ASU from 1987 until his death in 2016,” said Dan Collins, one of the founders of the PRISM lab and a professor of intermedia in the School of Art, part of the Herberger Institute of Design and the Arts.  Binded Gypsum 3D print "Michael Just shaved his beard and has been second guessing since," by ASU grad student Andrew Noble. This Binded Gypsum 3-D print, titled "Michael just shaved his beard and has been second-guessing since," was created by graduate art student Andrew Noble using resources from the 3DVP lab. Photo courtesy of the Gerald Farin Lab for 3D Visualization and Prototyping Download Full Image

In addition to founding the PRISM lab with Collins and colleagues Anshuman Razdan and Mark Henderson, Farin was a computer science professor for 29 years in the Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering and considered a visionary.

“He was a brilliant computer scientist, educator and interdisciplinary thinker who was instrumental in establishing research in visualization and prototyping on the ASU campus and fostering an international dialogue around geometric modeling,” Collins said.

Just as the PRISM lab is a center for interdisciplinary research involving 3-D data, modeling, visualization and analysis, the new Gerald Farin Lab for 3D Visualization and Prototyping (3DVP) promises to be a space where researchers, students and collaborators will benefit from its resources.

Thanks to a generous one-time grant from ASU President Michael Crow, the lab will have five systems — four 3-D printers and one small CNC router, which will be on display during Friday evening’s dedication ceremony. The event will also include the unveiling of a new high-resolution, handheld 3-D scanner as well as DIY-type body scanners built with students. Artwork, forensic models from ASU West, medical teaching models from a collaboration with the Phoenix Children’s Hospital and more will be on hand at the dedication.

In addition, local engineer Steve Graber is in the process of building a large-scale “deltabot”-type machine for the lab that will be capable of creating a printed object more than 4 feet tall.

The School of Art, Fulton Schools of Engineering and the PRISM lab will dedicate the 3DVP at 7 p.m. Friday, April 21, at Grant Street Studios. The event coincides with Third Fridays, when the university community and the general public are invited to visit galleries, and the lab will be open from 6 until 9 p.m. 

Sarah A. McCarty

Communications and marketing coordinator, School and Film, Dance and Theatre, Herberger Institute

480-727-4433

 
image title
Flexible programs at ASU Study Abroad allow for different ways to see the world.
Want to study abroad & stay on track with degree? @ASUStudyAbroad has your back.
April 20, 2017

Since the inception of Global Intensive Experiences, the number of students studying abroad during breaks has more than doubled

When considering challenges such as staying on track for an on-time graduation, taking time away from family or work obligations and making a big dent in finances, the Arizona State University Study Abroad Office adopted a new program model to meet students where they are.

Similar to faculty-led programs where students take courses with an ASU professor and other ASU students, this new type of program (coined Global Intensive Experiences) bridges these gaps, and does so during seven- to 12-day academic breaks, typically winter or spring break.

With tuition packaged within the regular semester costs, these programs offer an affordable price tag (particularly since financial aid and scholarships apply) and don’t disrupt jam-packed major maps. These programs are also ideal for first-generation college students, the novice traveler or students who want to reserve their summers for internships or work.

“By offering innovative scheduling options, we can reach more students with different kinds of experiences,” said Andi Hess, study abroad program faculty director.

This past spring break, students learned about the coffee industry in Costa Ricadove into topics related to borders and identity in Cuba and got a taste for the Peace Corps in the Dominican Republic — all while earning academic credit. Starting in 2016, there were four programs and 65 student participants. In the current year, students had three times the amount of opportunity at 12 programs, with 176 student participants, and 2018 will offer around 30 programs with spots for nearly 300 students.

The Study Abroad Office hasn’t stopped there. To offer more options for students’ schedules, spring 2018 is a pioneering time for semester-long faculty-led programs abroad, offered during sessions A and B. The goal of these programs is to provide more economically sound options for students without disrupting their academic schedules.

One of the inaugural semester faculty-led programs in Chiang Mai, Thailand (directed by ASU Professor Martin Matuštík), offers a direct look into the culture through the Southeast Asian-West Perspectives on Philosophy, Religion and Society. With the choice of six or nine credits, students will spend seven and a half weeks bookended between winter break and spring break studying death, social conflict and transformation, and cultural and gender studies.

“Spending a semester abroad is something that a student may never have time to do again. ASU offers many programs abroad, but this one is among the very few that give students a full semester-equivalent abroad and still one session back on campus,” Matuštík said.

Besides developing intercultural competence and leadership skills required to face global challenges, Matuštík noted that students will “expand in new directions, make one’s resume stand out, pursue new topics for a capstone, thesis or field experience (clinical, political-NGO, religious or social work field experience or internship).”

On the other side of the world, Hess’ session B program is another faculty-directed option to study Identity and Conflict in the Balkans.

“The semester schedule also allows students to fit study abroad into their planned academic schedule in ways many can’t during the summers due to family, work and other obligations,” she said. “Innovative options like embedded semester programs allow us to reach more students with these incredible transformative opportunities, which in turn enriches our community.”

This five-week program offers six credits for students and covers five cities in four countries across Eastern Europe.

“We will be able to engage with local people of all kinds that would otherwise be inaccessible during the busy summer months when many areas are crowded with tourists. We are also able to offer these programs to students at a lower cost when they occur during off-seasons,” Hess said.

These programs support the vision of the Study Abroad Office in providing every student with meaningful opportunities for academic and personal growth. Students can participate in programs as short as a week, as long as a year and everything in between. ASU credit is issued on all programs, and students can earn credit toward their major, minor, certificate, general education coursework or electives. Global Intensive Experiences and faculty-led programs are only two of the four program types, with partnership and exchange options readily available for students as well.

Apply to Matuštík’s program in Thailand here, or follow his Facebook page for more details. The application to Hess’ program in the Balkans is here. The deadline for these two programs is Sept. 25.

To learn more about the 250-plus study abroad programs in more than 65 different countries offered at ASU, see the Study Abroad Office website.

 

Top photo: The Phra Singh Temple in Chiang Mai, Thailand. Photo by Panupong Roopyai/Wikimedia Commons

Carrie Herrera Niesen

Communications and marketing specialist , Study Abroad Office

480-727-9635