Ceramics faculty selects the best of the best from collection for summer exhibition


May 12, 2003

TEMPE, Ariz. – The Ceramics Research Center at the ASU Art Museum will kick off new summer hours with the pick of its collection in an exhibition that runs June 7 – Sept. 14. Ceramics Faculty Selects: Clay from the Permanent Collection consists of 36 works chosen from the center’s 3,000-piece collection by the Herberger College’s three ceramic faculty members. The center’s hours will parallel those of the museum’s Nelson Fine Arts Center location: Tuesday – Saturday, 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.

The selected objects demonstrate the full range of technique and stylistic possibilities within the ceramic field, from historical work to wheel-thrown functional pottery to avant-garde sculpture. Some of the artists represented in the exhibition include Robert Arneson, Rudy Autio, Ruth Duckworth, Maria Martinez, David Shaner, Toshiko Takaezu, Peter Voulkos and Betty Woodman. 

The Herberger School of Art’s ceramics faculty – Kurt Weiser, Randy Schmidt and Jeanne Otis – have nearly a century of combined experience as artists and educators. In addition to the selected works, each faculty member will have one of their own art works on exhibit to illustrate their personal work. 

Weiser, Schmidt and Otis teach in the Herberger College’s ceramics program, which was recently ranked 14th in the country by U.S.News & World Report. They have diverse backgrounds, concepts and technical skills in the ceramics field, which are reflected in the works selected for this exhibition.

Curator of ceramics Peter Held said that the size of the ASU Art Museum’s collection made the process of selection a rewarding but somewhat daunting task. “The end result mirrors the diversity of the permanent collection, which is used as a teaching tool for many of their students,” Held said.

Jeanne Otis’s background and training as an artist began in painting and drawing, and color continues to be important in her ceramic work. She also is drawn to artists with a painterly quality such as Toshiko Takaezu, Betty Woodman and Jun Kaneko. In addition, she is attracted to the unexpected in functional forms, such as the work of Anne Hirondelle and Phil Cornelius, who incorporate a strong sculptural element in their work.

Randy Schmidt is trained as a sculptor and his selections reflect his concerns with form and volume. Among his choices for this exhibition is a piece by Robert Arneson, who was part of the funk movement that created controversy during Schmidt’s formative years at graduate school. Schmidt’s own work is that of an object-maker, often combining other media with clay that has a personal narrative quality.

Many of Kurt Weiser’s choices include his appreciation of functional forms. The work of David Shaner, Chris Staley and John Ward demonstrates the self-assured hand of the makers, with simple yet compelling form. Weiser’s passion for Asian ceramics and obsessive decoration is illustrated in the work of Ralph Bacerra, which he also selected for the exhibition.

Ceramic Faculty Selects: Clay from the Permanent Collection will close with a free public reception, 7-9 p.m., Sept. 13, during which the ceramic faculty members will lead a gallery walk-through to discuss the various pieces they selected for the exhibition.

The ASU Art Museum is a division of The Katherine K. Herberger College of Fine Arts at Arizona State University. It is located on the southeast corner of Mill Avenue and 10th Street, Tempe. For more information, members of the public should call (480) 965-2787 or visit the museum online athttp://asuartmuseum.asu.edu.

When You Go:
Location: The Ceramics Research Center, NE corner Mill Avenue and 10th Street, Tempe.
Date & Time: Ceramic Faculty Selects: Clay from the Permanent Collection will run June 7 – August 31.
A free public reception from 7-9 p.m., Sept. 13, will mark the close of the exhibition.
Hours: Tuesday – Saturday: 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.; Sunday and Monday: closed.
Parking: Free parking is available in ASU Art Museum-marked spaces at the south end of Tempe Center, located at the NE corner of Mill Avenue and 10th Street. Visitors using museum spaces must sign in at the front desk in the lobby of the Nelson Fine Arts Center. ASU parking is also free on weekends and after 7 p.m. on weeknights.
Website: http://asuartmuseum.asu.edu
Cost: Free

Media Contact:
Jennifer Pringle
480-965-8795
jennifer.pringle@asu.edu Rudy Autio, b. 1926, American " Two Woman and a Dog," 1981 Gift of Ann and Sam Davis Photo courtesy of Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts. Download Full Image

Museum Store Collects exhibition offers snapshot of ASU Art Museum collection


May 28, 2003

TEMPE, Ariz. – The ASU Art Museum highlights the value of its wonderful team of store docents when it opens the summer exhibition, The Museum Store Collects, on May 10. The exhibition, featuring works purchased using funds from the museum store, runs through Sept.13, when a public reception will mark its close.

The Museum Store Collects will present work purchased throughout the museum’s history, using what senior curator Heather Lineberry describes as the museum’s only consistent source of acquisition funds. The work purchased runs the gamut of the museum’s collecting emphases and parallels its history as those emphases have shifted. Download Full Image

Lineberry said the exhibition offers a good overview of the museum’s collection, indicating that store funds have been well used to build broad strength in the collection.

“This is a way for our patrons to walk into the museum and get a sense of the breadth of our collections,” Lineberry said. “Proceeds from The Museum Store have enabled us to build our collection, and the exhibition will be a snapshot of the history and mission of the ASU Art Museum’s collection, with strong emphasis on each of our collecting areas.”

Important pieces in each of the museum’s major areas of collecting – contemporary art, ceramics, Latin American art, prints (both historic and contemporary) and regional art – have been purchased using store funds.

The exhibition will feature prints by artists from 18th-century artist Francisco Goya to recent Valley resident Kim Cridler. Likewise, the ceramic pieces in the collection vary from crocks to important works by contemporary ceramists such as the Herberger College’s Kurt Weiser. Artists in other fields who will be represented in the exhibition include Cuba’s Los Carpinteros and Abel Barroso, sculptor John Ahearn, painter Hung Liu and the Valley’s own Jon Haddock, whose computer game-style images have been exhibited at the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York.

The ASU Art Museum Store is and always has been run completely by volunteers – an increasingly rare situation today. ASU Art Museum director Marilyn Zeitlin said that the docents have supported the museum since its inception, creating continuity with the museum's past and acting as partners in building its future.

“The Museum Store is one of its most valuable projects in support of the museum, enabling us to purchase works of art that reflect the museum’s overall mission of illuminating the relationship of art to society,” Zeitlin said. “The docents work entirely as volunteers, giving hours, advice, wisdom and good cheer to us every single day. It is a love-love relationship and we are so grateful to know these wonderful people.”

Started by Tempe resident Astrid Thomas and now run by Scottsdale resident LaReal Eyring, the store features a wide range of high quality art, craft, toys and cards from around the world. Eyring, who has volunteered in the store for 30 years and run it since 1989, has always ensured that it carries items in a range of prices, so children as well as adults can find and purchase a treasure.

Eyring credited a commitment to the university and the pleasure of working with other volunteers and the staff of the museum as the reason she and other docents have stayed so long. The quality of her staff, she says, is the reason ASU Art Museum’s store is the only one she knows of that is still completely volunteer-run.

“We have several docents in the museum who have been here 25 or 30 years. They are extraordinarily loyal,” Eyring said. “They are knowledgeable – they have attended classes and traveled the world. They give their services – they always turn up, they fill in for each other. You can’t hire people like that.”

The ASU Art Museum is a division of The Katherine K. Herberger College of Fine Arts at Arizona State University. It is located on the southeast corner of Mill Avenue and 10th Street, Tempe. For more information, please call (480) 965-2787 or visit the museum online athttp://asuartmuseum.asu.edu.

When You Go:
Location:ASU Art Museum, Nelson Fine Arts Center, corner Mill Avenue and 10th Street, Tempe.
Date & Time:The Museum Store Collects will run May 10 – Sept. 13.
A closing reception is scheduled for 7-9 p.m., Sept. 13, in conjunction with the museum’s fall season opening.
Parking:Free parking is available in ASU Art Museum-marked spaces at the south end of Tempe Center, located at the NE corner of Mill Avenue and 10th Street. Visitors using museum spaces must sign in at the front desk in the lobby of the Nelson Fine Arts Center. ASU parking is also free on weekends and after 7 p.m. on weeknights.
Website:http://asuartmuseum.asu.edu
Cost:Free



Media Contact:
Jennifer Pringle
480-965-8795
jennifer.pringle@asu.edu