“Our project is enriched by a collaboration of schools at ASU spanning engineering, science and the arts,” said Jaime Sanchez de la Vega, a sophomore in aerospace engineering and the team’s chief engineer. “This diverse involvement allows our mission to have a much greater impact than any of the participating schools could have by itself.”

While the engineering team will design and construct the satellite, the science team will utilize the information collected by the satellite to advance the scientific understanding of urban heat islands. The outreach team will then communicate this new knowledge to the community.

“The collaboration of different areas of human knowledge mirrors ASU’s mission as a New American University of academic excellence, interdisciplinary research, local impact and social embeddedness,” said de la Vega.

In addition to science and engineering roles, the team includes students who will take on responsibilities in public relations, journalism, graphic design, web development, videography and photography, making the team truly interdisciplinary. 

“The public outreach component of the mission is one of the most essential parts of the project,” said Sarah Rogers, a freshman in aerospace engineering and the team’s project manager. “It connects people directly to what is being done at ASU.”

Through the USIP Student Flight Research Opportunity program, NASA seeks to build science, technical, leadership and project skills among undergraduate students by offering them real-world experience in developing and flying science or technology experiments that are relevant to NASA’s missions. NASA will cover launch and flight costs.

Karin Valentine

Media Relations & Marketing manager, School of Earth and Space Exploration

480-965-9345