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Article spotlights shortage of males in nursing


November 30, 2012

It was men who attended the world’s first nursing school in India in 250 B.C., yet today, the percentage of practicing male nurses in the United States hovers at a mere six to seven percent. How can that be?

“Men in Nursing” is the featured article in the Fall issue of Innovations in Nursing & Health magazine, published by ASU’s College of Nursing and Health Innovation. The article discusses the gender disparity in the nursing field, why stereotypes endure and what can be done to encourage more men to join the profession to correct the imbalance. "Men in Nursing" is the featured article in the December issue of "Innovations in Nursing & Health" magazine, published by ASU's College of Nursing and Health Innovation. Photo by: ASU College of Nursing and Health Innovation Download Full Image

The reasons for the imbalance stems from the simple fact that nursing is traditionally perceived as a “woman’s job.” The nursing profession needs to place greater emphasis on recruiting men for a variety of reasons, particularly the projected shortage of 260,000 nurses in the United States by 2025.

Teri Pipe, dean of the College of Nursing and Health Innovation says, “At ASU we are always looking for more ways to provide an inclusive learning environment. We look for ways to provide positive role models. We need to do a better job of getting the word out about all of the roles in nursing, the variety of things people can do and the flexibility that comes with a nursing degree.”

Pipe said opportunities abound in everything from informatics to working in communities critical-care units and emergency departments, and performing research, as well as administrative roles.

For Joshua Stark, 27, who is in his final year at ASU’s College of Nursing and Health Innovation, it’s a way to connect with his fellow man. Stark recently completed an OB/GYN rotation and said the new dads were appreciative of having a male nurse on-hand during labor and delivery. “The dads loved having a male nurse because they weren’t the odd man out,” Stark said. “Nursing is a field for intelligent, passionate people who truly care about others. None of those qualities are specific to either gender.”

The article suggests that nursing’s academic leaders should partner with schools and community-based organizations to reach potential students, offering loans and grants that target students in accelerated-degree nursing programs where the students are more likely to be male. The American Assembly for Men in Nursing recently introduced the Future of Nursing Campaign for Action, pushing for an increase in the percentage of male nursing students from its current 12 percent to 20 percent by 2020.

To obtain a copy of the Fall issue of Innovations in Nursing and Health magazine, visit https://nursingandhealth.asu.edu/magazine

 

Reporter , ASU Now

480-727-5176

ASU News

For holiday shopping (and discounts) visit the ASU Art Museum


December 3, 2012

“It’s the thought that counts,” goes the old saying. But it never hurts if the gift is nice, too.

This holiday season, the ASU Art Museum Store, in the Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts, is the place in Tempe to find gifts that are thoughtful, beautiful and socially conscious.  Download Full Image

When you shop at the museum store, you’re shopping local. According to Local First, of which the museum is a member, when shoppers choose to spend their money locally, 73 percent remains in the local economy, compared to just 43 percent from non-local stores. 

And from Dec. 4 to Dec. 22, just in time for Christmas and Hanukkah, the museum store is offering 20 percent off all its merchandise. Museum members receive a whopping 30 percent discount.

Over the past year, the store has moved in a new direction, focusing on local artists and works by ASU alumni and faculty.

ASU School of Art alumna and faculty associate Ann Morton is the creative force behind Street Gems, eco-friendly contemporary jewelry made from discarded items such as plastic bottles, bags and caution tape. This wearable art is made by homeless artisans affiliated with Lodestar Day Resource Center in Phoenix. The social initiative gives the jewelry makers the opportunity to learn a new skill and work as a team, helping them feel a sense of pride and connection to the community.

Jewelers Wendy Grace and Mimi Jardine are both Phoenicians with distinctive styles.  Wendy Grace, who was trained as a sculptor, makes simple, elegant necklaces, bracelets, earrings and rings using silver, gold and precious gems; her fans include celebrities like Meredith Vieira and Rachael Ray. And Mimi Jardine constructs one-of-a-kind necklaces that incorporate vintage beads, found objects and elements from her own jewelry collection, including baubles that belonged to her grandmother, each with its own hand-made box.

The store also carries ceramic pieces by highly acclaimed ASU School of Art faculty like Susan Beiner, Sam Chung and Kurt Weiser, as well as works from artists around the world, hand-made greeting cards, imaginative and challenging toys for children, Oaxacan wood carvings and other unusual items, all eligible for the holiday sale discount.

Museum store hours are the same as museum hours: 11 a.m.-8 p.m.,Tuesday; 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Wednesday-Saturday.  Closed Sundays and Mondays.

Juno Schaser

Event coordinator, Biodesign Institute

480-965-0014